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816->8055 - 27/10/2009 05:07 PM
#1
•~• ۩ ۞ Tempat² Wisata di [Singapore] ۞ ۩ •~•
Hi Guys, Mau bertanya soal info tourism? Mau tau info apa aja seputar Singapore? bisa juga lewat mailing list ikutin petunjuk link dibawah
https://www.kaskus.co.id/showthread.php?t=11866319
atau bisa langsung apply lewat link dibawah ini:
https://groups.google.com/group/regionalsingapore

[COLOR="Red"]Sentosa


Spoiler for pictures

•~• ۩ ۞ Tempat² Wisata di [Singapore] ۞ ۩ •~•



Sentosa, which translates to peace and tranquility in Malay, is a popular island resort in Singapore, visited by some five million people a year.[1] Attractions include a two-kilometre long sheltered beach, Fort Siloso, two golf courses and two five-star hotels, and the upcoming Resort Worlds at Sentosa, featuring the new theme park Universal Studios Singapore.

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Etymology
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Sentosa was once known as Pulau Blakang Mati,[3] which in Malay means the "Island (pulau) of Death (mati) from Behind (blakang)".

The name Blakang Mati is rather old but may not have been founded in the nineteenth century as generally believed. In fact, there exists an island that was identified as Blacan Mati in Manuel Gomes de Erédia's 1604 map of Singapore. Other early references to the island of Blakang Mati include Burne Beard Island in Wilde's 1780 MS map, Pulau Niry, Nirifa from 1690 to 1700, and the nineteenth century reference as Pulau Panjang (J.H. Moor). However, early maps did not separate Blakang Mati from the adjacent island of Pulau Brani, so it is uncertain to which island the sixteenth century place names referred.

The island has gone through several name changes. Up to 1830, it was called Pulau Panjang ("long island"). In an 1828 sketch of Singapore Island, the island is referred to as Po. Panjang. According to Bennett (1834), the name Blakang Mati was only given to the hill on the island by the Malay villagers on the island. The Malay name for this island is literally translated as "dead back" or "behind the dead"; blakang means "at the back" or "behind"; mati means "dead". It is also called the dead island or the island of the dead.

Different versions of how the island came to acquire such an unpropitious name abound. One account attributed the ominous name to murder and piracy in the island's past. A second claimed that the island is the material paradise of warrior spirits buried at Pulau Brani.

A fourth interpretation is that "dead back island" was so-called because of the lack of fertile soil on the hills.

In 1827, Captain Edward Lake of the Bengal Engineers in his report on public works and fortifications had proposed an alternative name for Blakang Mati as the "Island of St George". However, the island was seen as too unhealthy for habitation and his proposed name was never realised.

In a 1972 contest organised by the Singapore Tourist Promotion Board, the island was renamed Sentosa, a Malay word meaning "peace and tranquillity".

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History
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Pre-1945

Spoiler for pic

•~• ۩ ۞ Tempat² Wisata di [Singapore] ۞ ۩ •~•

Gunners at work on a 6 Inch Gun emplacement at Fort Siloso.

In the nineteenth century, the island was considered important because it protected the passage into Keppel Harbour. Plans to fortify the island as part of the defence plan for Singapore were drawn up as early as 1827, but few fortifications actually materialised until the 1880s, when the rapid growth of the harbour led to concern over the protection of coal stocks against enemy attack. The forts built on the island were Fort Siloso, Fort Serapong, Fort Connaught and the Mount Imbiah Battery.

The western end of Pulau Blakang Mati, the place where Fort Siloso is now, used to be called sarang rimau (the tiger's den). Salusuh is a kind of herb used as a remedy in childbirth, but there is no explanation of how the fort came to be so-called, the orang laut of Kampong Kopit only knowing the place by the name of sarang rimau. By the 1930s, the island was heavily fortified and a crucial component of Fortress Singapore, and the base of the Royal Artillery.

During the Second World War, the island was a British military fortress. The British set up artillery guns in Fort Siloso that were then pointed to the south, facing the sea in expectation of a seaward Japanese assault. However, the Japanese eventually invaded and captured Singapore from the north, after having done the same to Malaya (now known as West or Peninsular Malaysia). Following the surrender of the Allied Forces on February 15, 1942, the island became a prisoner of war camp, housing Australian and British prisoners of the Japanese.

During the Japanese Occupation, under the Sook Ching Operation, Chinese men who were suspected, often arbitrarily, of being involved in anti-Japanese activities were brutally killed. The beach at Pulau Blakang Mati was one of the killing fields.

1945-1972

After the Japanese surrender in 1945 and the return of Singapore to British rule, the island became the base of the locally enlisted First Singapore Regiment of the Royal Artillery (1st SRRA) in 1947. Other locally enlisted men from Singapore were sent to the island for basic military training before being sent to other units of the British Army in Singapore.

Ten years later, the 1st SRRA was disbanded and its guns dismantled. The coast artillery was replaced with Gurkha infantry units, first the 2/7th Duke of Edinburgh's own Gurkha Rifles and later the 2/10th Princess Mary's own Gurkha Rifles. Fort Siloso and Fort Serapong became a Catholic retreat and a Protestant church house respectively. Fort Connaught was left in ruins.

In the early 1960s, during the Indonesian Confrontation, the 2/10th unit defended the island against Indonesian saboteurs. With the end of the Confrontation in 1966 and the withdrawal of the Gurkha units from the island, the British handed over Sentosa to the Singapore Armed Forces of the newly independent Government of Singapore in 1967.

In 1967, Pulau Blakang Mati became the base for the Singapore Naval Volunteer Force, which relocated there from its old base at Telok Ayer Basin. The School of Maritime Training was also set up there, as was the first Naval Medical Centre.

In the 1970s, the government decided to develop the island into a holiday resort for local visitors and tourists.

1972-Present

The island was renamed “Sentosa” in 1972, which means peace and tranquillity in Malay, from a suggestion by the public.[3] The Sentosa Development Corporation was formed and incorporated on 1 September 1972 to oversee the development of the island.[3] Since then, some S$420 million of private capital and another S$500 million of government funds have been invested to develop the island.[3]

In 1974 the Singapore Cable Car system was built, linking Sentosa to Mount Faber.[5] A series of attractions were subsequently opened for visitors including Fort Siloso, Surrender Chamber wax museum, Musical Fountain, and the Underwater World. The causeway bridge was opened in 1992 connecting Sentosa to the mainland.[5]

The Sentosa Monorail system was opened in 1982 to transport visitors to various stations located around the island.[5] On 16 March 2005, the monorail service was discontinued to make way for the new Sentosa Express, which commenced operations on 15 January 2007.[5] An environmental assessment conducted by the government of Singapore concluded that the construction of the resorts on Sentosa would to result in high likelihood of high scale biodiversity loss, habitat destruction, soil erosion and climate change, as well as several other destructive ecological impacts.[1]

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Geography
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The island has an area of 5 square kilometres. It lies just half a kilometre (a quarter of a mile) away from the southern coast of the main island of Singapore. It is Singapore’s fourth largest island (excluding the main island). 70% of the island is covered by secondary rainforest, the habitat of monitor lizards, monkeys, peacocks, parrots as well as other native fauna and flora. The island also has 3.2 kilometre stretch of white sand beach. Significantly large portions of land are currently being added to Sentosa due to land reclamation.

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Transport
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Sentosa can be reached from the Singapore mainland via a short causeway or Cable Car, which originates on Mount Faber and passes through HarbourFront en route.

The island is also accessible by the SGD$140 million Sentosa Express monorail, which has four stations on Sentosa. Opened in 15 January 2007, the terminus of the line is at the VivoCity shopping mall on the mainland, which is in turn served by the HarbourFront MRT Station of the North East MRT Line. The journey takes four minutes. The WaterFront Station of the monorail is expected to open in 2010.

Within Sentosa there are three bus services, identified as Blue, Yellow and Red lines, and a tram service called the Beach Train. Since 1998, passenger cars have been allowed to enter the island.[/COLOR]
816->8055 - 27/10/2009 05:08 PM
#2

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Attractions
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Sentosa offers a variety of attractions, museums and other facilities to provide a variety of experiences, recreation and entertainment to visitors.

Tiger Sky Tower

Spoiler for pic

•~• ۩ ۞ Tempat² Wisata di [Singapore] ۞ ۩ •~•


The Tiger Sky Tower (previously known as the Carlsberg Sky Tower) is free-standing observation tower on Sentosa. At a height of 110 metres above ground and 131 metres above sea level, it offers visitors a panoramic view of Sentosa, Singapore, and the Southern Islands. On a clear day, the view extends to parts of Malaysia and Indonesia. At ground level, visitors enter a large disc-shaped airconditioned cabin fitted with glass windows all round. The cabin then revolves slowly as it ascends the column of the tower. The cabin has a capacity of 72 visitors.

The Sky Tower was opened on 7 February 2004, is situated in the Imbiah Lookout zone in the centre of Sentosa and can be reached by Cable Car, Sentosa Luge Chair Lift, by Sentosa Express or by bus.

Butterfly Park and Insect Kingdom

The Butterfly Park is a landscape garden with over 15,000 live butterflies, representing more than fifty species. Housed in a cool outdoor conservatory, these butterflies range from the 25 millimetre (1 in) Eurema sari to the 150 mm (6 in) Papilio iswara.

The Insect Kingdom houses some 3,000 species of rare insects from around the world, including a 160 mm Dynastes Hercules beetle.

Underwater World and Dolphin Lagoon

Underwater World is an oceanarium located on the western part of Sentosa. Opened in 1991, the living museum has more than 2,500 marine and fresh-water animals of 250 species from different regions of the world. The oceanarium is underground and has an 83 metre long travelator that moves visitors along a submerged glass-windowed tunnel from which they can look at an array of marine life including a coral reef, stringrays, moray eels, turtles, sharks, and other fishes. In the 'Dive-with-the-Sharks' program visitors can scuba dive in the large oceanarium, even if they are not scuba qualified. Qualified scuba divers can also 'Dive-with-the-Dugong".

The Underwater World also includes a Dolphin Lagoon which is home to some Indo-Pacific humpback dolphins, also known as the pink dolphins. Several "Meet-the-Dolphins" sessions are held daily to allow visitors to enter the waist-deep pool and interact with the dolphins at close proximity. A more involved "Swim-with-the-Dolphins' program, where visitors can interact extensively with the dolphins, is also available.[6]

Songs of the Sea

The Songs of the Sea show, started on 26 March 2007, replaced the 25-year-old Musical Fountain show. This showcase is a key $30 million investment by Sentosa to enhance its entertainment product offerings and to attract more tourists. It is the world’s only permanent show set in the sea - boasting spectacular pyrotechnics displays, a live cast and an open-air viewing gallery which can comfortably accommodate 2,500 visitors. The show runs twice a night at 7.40pm and 8.40pm and lasts 25 minutes. An entry fee of S$10.00 per person (w.e.f. 1 April 2009) is required for the show.[7]

Sentosa 4D Magix

The Sentosa 4D Magix is Singapore's first and Southeast Asia's original 4-dimensional theatre. Opened in January 2006 at the cost of S$3.5 million, the theatre is equipped with state-of-the-art Digital Projection and DTS 6.1 sound system. Guests will be seated on a motion based chair in a typical movie theatre watching a 3D show with visual effects popping out of the screen coupled with environmental effects providing a life-like feel. The current show is the 'Pirates!' in 4D comedy, as offered in other theme parks around the world.

Sentosa CineBlast

Opened in June 2007, the CineBlast is Singapore's only cinema ride. Equipped with the latest high definition wide-screen projection, digital technologies and state-of-the-art 6 axis motion systems, unique sound and light technology that is found in theme parks such as Universal Studios in the United States, the cinema simulation ride will bring visitors on a log ride, beginning with a pre-ride show that will excite the riders before experiencing the ride before transporting the visitors into a virtual world of thrilling experiences. Guests will be seated in capsules of 6, with each capsule costing over S$150 000, making the costs of all capsules in CineBlast to be over S$1 million.[8]

Fort Siloso
The refurbished Fort Siloso today.

Spoiler for pic

•~• ۩ ۞ Tempat² Wisata di [Singapore] ۞ ۩ •~•


In the west of the island stand the guns of preserved Fort Siloso which guarded the western approaches to Singapore during World War II. Fort Siloso was built by the British in 1880s to guard the narrow western entrance to Keppel Harbour. It was later modernised and by 1939 was armed with two 6-inch Mark2 guns and two rapid firing 12-pounder guns. Fort Siloso is now the only surviving coastal gun battery from the twelve such batteries that made up Fortress Singapore at the start of the war.[9]

The ammunition bunkers, barracks, tunnels, and gun emplacements of the fort are now open to visitors, as a military-themed attraction. Also on display is a collection of artillery guns dating from the 17th century to World War II. Life-sized replicas of British soldiers and other people were on display to depict lives at the fort in the past. There is also an exhibition with a large collection of photographs, documents and film clips.

The fort served as the place of internment of the Singaporean political prisoner Chia Thye Poh in the period from 1989 to 1993.

MEGAZIP

The MEGAZIP is a 450-metre Zip-line. It is one of the longest and steepest zipwire descents in Asia. It was opened in mid-2009.

Merlion

The Merlion statue recalls the story of the legendary Sang Nila Utama, who saw a lion in Singapore (originally known as Temasek) while hunting. The 37 metre (12 storey) high statue can be entered through the ground floor, and one can take the lift up to 12th floor to view the city state. Opened in 1996, it is the tallest Merlion in the whole Singapore. It is also very popular.

Sentosa Luge & Skyride

The Sentosa Luge & Skyride is a self-steering, gravity-driven three-wheel cart. Originated from New Zealand, the non-motorised cart allows rider to speed down a hill over a course of 650 m ending at the Siloso Beach.
[edit] The Flying Trapeze

The Flying Trapeze is a form of sport and recreation that helps develop one's mind, body and coordination. It also helps conquer one's fear of height.

Defunct attractions

Sijori Wondergolf

Sijori Wondergolf is a miniature golf park. There are 54 landscaped greens set in three different 18-hole courses.

Fantasy Island

Fantasy Island was a water based theme park in Sentosa. Opened in 1994 at a cost of S$54 million, it had numerous water slides and other features. Once a very popular park, it was plagued by several accidents, including two fatalities, and was eventually closed on 2 November 2002.

Sentosa Monorail

The Sentosa Monorail circled Sentosa until it closed in 2005. Most of the island monorail was dismantled though parts of the original track structure still remain. The monorail was replaced by the red, blue and white bus lines. The monorail service from the main island of Singapore to Sentosa still remains in service.

Volcanoland

Volcanoland featured an artificial volcano along with Mayan motifs and scenery. The integrated resort will be built over this site.

Musical Fountain

After operating for 25 years, the Musical Fountain went into the history of Sentosa when its last show was staged on 25 March 2007. It is now being replaced by The Songs of the Sea show. This nightly show that was staged in the past was used as a water fountain, with lasers and music. The refractive and reflective effect of the lasers against water particles from several directions create a three-dimensional image.

816->8055 - 27/10/2009 05:09 PM
#3

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Beaches
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Spoiler for pic

•~• ۩ ۞ Tempat² Wisata di [Singapore] ۞ ۩ •~•

Sentosa has a stretch of sheltered beach of more than two kilometres in length on its southern coast, divided into three portions: Palawan Beach, Siloso Beach, and Tanjong Beach. These beaches are artificial, reclaimed using sand bought from Indonesia and Malaysia.

Palawan Beach

Palawan Beach lies in the centre of the southern coast of Sentosa. There is a suspension bridge that leads to a small islet off the coast which is said to be the Southernmost Point of Continental Asia, or Asia's closest point to the Equator. [10]

There are several bars along the beach offering food and beverage to visitors as well as Beach Station of Sentosa Express.

Siloso Beach

Siloso Beach lies on the west portion of the southern coast and it is known as the place for beach volleyball and other outdoor activities such as canoeing, skim boarding, mountain biking or rollerblading. There are also dining and shopping outlets along the beach. The Shangri-La Rasa Sentosa Resort is located at the western end of Siloso Beach.

Tanjong Beach

Tanjong Beach is a relatively more secluded part of the southern coast. The crescent-shaped beach is sometimes used for special events or parties. The beach bar 'KM8' is located at the beach. KM8 had his last party and closed down on 28.03.2009.

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Other facilities
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Hotels

There are seven hotels and resorts in Sentosa:

* Shangri-La's Rasa Sentosa is a beachfront five-star hotel located at the western tip of Siloso beach, with 459 rooms and suites.
* The Sentosa Resort & Spa is a five-star hotel with 214 rooms and suites.
* Costa Sands Resort operates a number of chalets and 15 kampung-like huts. It is located on a hill overlooking Siloso Beach.
* Treasure Resort (formerly known as Sijori Resort) is a 64 room hotel located behind the Merlion together with the Sijori WonderGolf facility.
* Siloso Beach Resort opened in July 2006. It has 182 rooms to choose from their Superior, Deluxe, Family, and Roof Garden Suite. And 12 Villas. In line with ecologically friendly carbon credit practices, over 600 of the original trees that are native to Sentosa island were preserved. 1000 more fruit trees, flowering plants, exotic ferns, and herbs were planted. With the deliberate architecture of the Resort to circumnavigate and protect these trees.
* Amara Sanctuary Resort Sentosa has five-star hotel facilities, and 121 rooms to offer.
* Capella Singapore is a luxury resort with 112 rooms designed by Lord Norman Foster. It is developed by Pontiac Land. It was officially opened on March 2009.

Upcoming accommodation

* Resorts World at Sentosa(Chinese: 圣淘沙名胜世界) is the name of the integrated resort in development stages on the island of Sentosa, off the southern coast of Singapore. The S$5.2 billion dollar integrated resort is currently being built by Genting International and Star Cruises, who hold a 75% and 25% stake in the project, respectively. The 49 hectare integrated resort will cost S$600 million solely for land, and S$1.6 billion just on a Universal Studios theme park called Universal Studios Singapore. The Theme Park together with 4 hotels and a Casino will be opened in 1Q 2010.

Spa

* Fish Reflexology is a unique foot massage where Turkish spa fish or African spa fish nibble on the dead skin of one's feet, making the skin smooth. This is followed by a Reflexology session. This is available in the Underwater World.
* Health Club and Spa consists of three deluxe suites, one of which has a private whirlpool and steam facility, seven single treatment rooms with attached showers and a Thai Pavilion, which is a private, open air garden unit perched over a fish pond and water fall.
* Spa Botanica is set in the Sentosa Resort & Spa. It has facilities including mud pools and Turkish-styled steam baths.

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Events
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Barclays Singapore Open

The Barclays Singapore Open golf event is held yearly at the Sentosa Golf Club's Serapong Course. It is the richest golf tournament which is exclusive to the Asian Tour with a US$5 million prize fund.[5]
[edit] Sentosa Balloon Hats Festival

The Sentosa Balloon Hats Festival began in 2004. It is a gathering of local secondary school bands who would do display marches along the beach from Tanjong Beach to Palawan Beach before a mass display event. The participants would wear balloon hats made by themselves and each school comes up with their unique design. At the end of the event, all the students would pop their balloons followed by a release of a large number of balloons into the air. The event began as part of an attempt to create the world record for the gathering of the largest number of balloon hats. But since then, it had developed into a full scale annual event with performances around the whole island before the marching event began.

Beach parties

The Siloso Beach in Sentosa is host to the annual ZoukOut beach dance party organised by Zouk nightclub. On 10 December 2005, some 18,000 people attended the event. [11]

A new year eve party, Siloso NYE Splash is also held annually at the Siloso Beach. On 31 December 2005, the party attracted some 15,000 people.

Sentosa Flowers

Beginning in February 2005, the Sentosa Flowers event is held at the Fountain Gardens, exhibiting a variety of flora and herbs. The festival, which coincides with the Chinese New Year or the "Spring Festival" celebration in Singapore, hosts other activities including a mural painting competition, photograph competitions and a festival market for gardening enthusiasts.

SWATCH-FIVB Beach Volleyball

The SWATCH-FIVB Beach Volleyball World Tour 2007 was held during 24-27 May at the Siloso Beach. This is the first ever Women’s world tour event and was the biggest ever beach lifestyle event hosted on the island. This is also the first time Olympic qualification as well as Olympic level athletes compete on Singapore soil for Beach Volleyball.

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Future development
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Future plans by the government for Sentosa aims to establish it as one of the world's most luxurious holiday locations, with a SGD$10 billion masterplan for the future involving the construction of private housing at the Sentosa Cove, the aforementioned partial redevelopment of Siloso Beach, and Asia's first tourism academy. These large scale island redevelopment projects are expected to complete in 2012.

Resorts World at Sentosa

The largest impact is expected to be from a family-oriented Integrated Resort, with a casino at its core. This Integrated Resort is expected to be completed in late 2009 or the beginning of 2010. A resort developer and operator was chosen on 8 December 2006. The winning proposal was the Genting/Star Cruises consortium in their bid for Resorts World Sentosa. It will have a Universal Studios Theme Park, to be known as Universal Studios Singapore which will occupy nearly half of the resort space. Development of the resort will be financed privately at a cost of $GD5.75 billion and will not receive any government subsidies. The proposal for a casino has met with extensive opposition from many conservative critics. Nevertheless, the government has constantly reassured that there would be stringent measures in place, to maintain the social fabric of the nation Singapore, and to prevent problems such as gambling addiction.
816->8055 - 27/10/2009 05:10 PM
#4
Orchard road
[COLOR="Red"]Orchard Road

Spoiler for pic

•~• ۩ ۞ Tempat² Wisata di [Singapore] ۞ ۩ •~•
•~• ۩ ۞ Tempat² Wisata di [Singapore] ۞ ۩ •~•


Orchard Road is a road in Singapore that is the retail and entertainment hub of the city-state. It is regularly frequented by the local population as well as being a major tourist attraction. Often the surrounding area is known simply as Orchard.

The immediate vicinity of Orchard Road, Orchard Planning Area is one of 55 urban planning areas as specified by the Urban Redevelopment Authority, and is a commercial district. It is part of the Central Region, and Singapore's central business district, the Central Area.

During the National Day Rally Speech 2005, Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong said that he would create more landmark buildings to create more fun in the district, partly to keep up with vibrant cities around the region.

Orchard Road recently underwent a $40 million revamp, with the addition of new street lamps, planter boxes, urban green rooms, street tiling, and flower totem poles, excluding three new malls under construction as of April 2009.

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Geography
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Entrance of Orchard MRT Station

Spoiler for pic

•~• ۩ ۞ Tempat² Wisata di [Singapore] ۞ ۩ •~•


Orchard Road is a one-way street. It starts at the junction with Orange Grove Road which is the location of the Orchard Hotel. It then stretches southeast across the Scotts Road/Paterson Hill junction, Orchard MRT Station, Bideford Road, Somerset MRT Station, Central Expressway, Dhoby Ghaut MRT Station, and ends at the junction with Handy Road (just before Prinsep Street), where it becomes Bras Basah Road. It has an extensive underground infrastructure, including underground pedestrian walkways between the malls running underneath the street and also other streets in the vicinity. The numbers actually begin at Handy Road and end at Orange Grove Road.

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History
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Orchard Road was named for the orchards that formerly lined the road

Orchard Road got its name from the nutmeg, pepper and fruit orchards that used to lie on either side of the street in the 1840s. Commercial development only began in the twentieth century, and took off in the 1970s.

Orchard Road was already cut in the 1830s, though the new road was not named in George Coleman's 1836 Map of Singapore. In the 1830s the Orchard Road area was the scene of gambier and pepper plantations. Later, nutmeg plantations and fruit orchards predominated, hence its name.

By 1846, the spread of houses had reached up to Tank Road. There were none on the left side and only three or four houses went past Tank Road on the right side of Orchard Road.

One major sight during this period was a Dr Jun tending his garden, which helped endorse the road's name. He had a garden and plantation at the corner of what is now Scotts Road and Orchard Road.

Towards the later part of the 1840s, graveyards began to appear along the road. By 1846, the Chinese had a large graveyard around what is now the Meritus Mandarin Hotel and Ngee Ann City, while the Sumatrans from Bencoolen had their burial ground where the current Grand Central Hotel stands. Later a Jewish cemetery was established; it was located where Dhoby Ghaut MRT Station is now situated, and demolished in 1984.

In the 1860s, Orchard Road had a great number of private houses and bungalows on hills looking down through the valley where the road passed through. Early in the 1890s, His Majesty Somdetch Phra Paramindr Maha Chulalongkorn, the supreme King of Siam, acquired "Hurricane House" in the vicinity of Orchard Road through Tan Kim Ching, the Thai Consul in Singapore. Two further pieces of adjoining property were added later and these subsequently became the site of the present Royal Thai Embassy at 370 Orchard Road.

In the early 20th century, it was noted that Orchard Road "present[ed] the appearance of a well-shaded avenue to English mansion[s]", comparable in its "quiet but effective beauty to Devonshire lanes." The Chinese called the area tang leng pa sat koi or "Tanglin market street". The Tamils refer to the road as vaira kimadam or "fakir's place", and muttu than (high ground), a reference to the hilly nature of the area.

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Notable past and present landmarks
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Spoiler for pic

•~• ۩ ۞ Tempat² Wisata di [Singapore] ۞ ۩ •~•
•~• ۩ ۞ Tempat² Wisata di [Singapore] ۞ ۩ •~•

Orchard Road junction with Scotts Road.
Plaza Singapura is a major shopping centre in Orchard

Perhaps the most elegant building on Orchard Road is the Istana, at its southern end. Nibong palms survive near its entrance, with a plaque that reads: "As the nibong is a mangrove palm, this site must have once been a mangrove swamp." If this information is accurate, then Orchard Road was once a muddy swamp and these palms are remnants of that original habitat.

On the northern side of Orchard Road is the Botanic Gardens. Along Scotts Road is Goodwood Park Hotel, a fine example of colonial architecture and a monument. At the junction of Scotts Road and Orchard Road is TANGS, the first upmarket department store in Singapore.

About halfway down Orchard Road are Cairnhill and Emerald Hill, where the rich Chinese built their residences, now prime properties sought after by affluent professionals and expatriates. Next to Emerald Hill is Centrepoint, which houses the supermarket Cold Storage, possibly the oldest surviving business establishment in the area. Other establishments have not been so fortunate. Amber Mansions, one of the earliest apartment blocks in Singapore, built around the turn of the 20th century, was torn down in the 1980s to make way for the Dhoby Ghaut MRT Station.
Orchard Road intersection with Orchard Link.

Occupying the site of the former Pavilion Cinema, Specialists' Shopping Centre was one of the earliest redevelopment projects on Orchard Road. The shopping centre had been demolished to make way for a new development, Orchard Central. Its flagship store was John Little, which has been trading in Singapore since the mid-19th century, when it opened its first outlet in Commercial Square (now Raffles Place).

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Shopping
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Spoiler for pic

•~• ۩ ۞ Tempat² Wisata di [Singapore] ۞ ۩ •~•
•~• ۩ ۞ Tempat² Wisata di [Singapore] ۞ ۩ •~•

•~• ۩ ۞ Tempat² Wisata di [Singapore] ۞ ۩ •~•

The first shop of note on Orchard Road was TANGS founded in 1934 and established on Orchard Road in the 1950s.

Orchard Road is flanked by pedestrian malls. A retail complex under construction at the site named ION Orchard has the distinction of also being a future residential area, and is planned to be completed by end-2009.[1]

Orchard Road also contains numerous upmarket restaurants, coffee chains, cafés, nightclubs and hotels. It is also the site of the official residence of the President of Singapore, the Istana.

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816->8055 - 27/10/2009 05:11 PM
#5
Bugis
[COLOR="Red"]BUGIS

Spoiler for pic

•~• ۩ ۞ Tempat² Wisata di [Singapore] ۞ ۩ •~•
•~• ۩ ۞ Tempat² Wisata di [Singapore] ۞ ۩ •~•

Bugis Junction (Chinese: 白沙浮广场) is an integrated development located at Victoria Street, Middle Road and North Bridge Road in Bugis, Downtown Core Planning Area in Singapore. The development consists of a shopping mall, an office tower and the InterContinental Singapore Hotel. The development was completed in 1995 and its owned by BCH Investments Pte Ltd which is a subsidiary of Keppel Land. CapitaLand's REIT, CapitaMall Trust owns a portion of the building. The mall also has a glass covered shopping streets which is the first in the country.

Anchor tenants include BHG which was formerly known as Seiyu. Other tenants include, Books Kinokuniya, Cold Storage, Food Junction, Shaw Organisation which runs the Bugis Cineplex. There is a youth-themed zone in the mall and numerous restaurants in the building. Kiosks are found along the shopping streets and shops are by the side, with shophouse themed buildings.

The Bugis was commonly known for the large community of transsexuals and transvesittes that worked the area.

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Buildings
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Bugis Junction consists of four sections. They are Bugis Junction Tower, Parco Bugis Junction, Seiyu Bugis Junction and InterContinental Singapore.

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Accessibility
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Bugis Junction is accessible via an underpass from Bugis station on the Mass Rapid Transit. Bugis MRT station will be the interchange to the Downtown Line or East-West Line. The mall can be accessed by car through two car park entrances and there are bus stops located around the mall.[/COLOR]
816->8055 - 27/10/2009 05:11 PM
#6
Vivo city
[COLOR="Red"]VIVO CITY
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•~• ۩ ۞ Tempat² Wisata di [Singapore] ۞ ۩ •~•


VivoCity (Chinese: 怡丰城) is the largest shopping mall in Singapore, located at the HarbourFront precinct . Opened on 7 October 2006, it marked the completion of the main structure by a topping-out ceremony on 18 April 2006 and was officially opened on 1 December 2006. Derived from the word vivacity, VivoCity, according to Mapletree Chairman Edmund Cheng, "evokes a lifestyle experience that is modern, stimulating and accessible to everyone, a place bubbling with energy and flowing with vitality". At the end of the first week of operations, the mall had received nearly a million visitors.

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History
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VivoCity was built on the site of the exhibition halls of the former World Trade Centre, now the HarbourFront Centre. VivoCity has 1,500,000 square feet (139,000 m2) of gross floor area and 1,100,000 square feet (102,000 m2) of retail space, larger than Suntec City and Ngee Ann City, the former of which was the largest prior to VivoCity's opening. It was designed by the renowned Japanese architect Toyo Ito. Mapletree Investments is the developer of the S$417 million complex.

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Official opening
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•~• ۩ ۞ Tempat² Wisata di [Singapore] ۞ ۩ •~•


The shopping mall opened officially on December 1, 2006 after its soft launch on October 7 that same year. The official opening included a six minute fireworks display, a concert by American band String Theory for the general public, and a Stefanie Sun concert at the mall's amphitheatre at the Sky Park on the third floor. The guest of honour of the event was chairman of Temasek Holdings and former cabinet minister S Dhanabalan. During its first month of opening, it attracted 4.2 million visitors, equivalent to the population of Singapore, and attracted 7.28 million visitors in total before the grand opening. The String Theory concert included a giant harp with strings stretching to the third floor of the mall. The concert was held at The Promenade and lasted ten days, starting on December 1 and ending on the 10th. Barricades were put at the boardwalk blocking the front portion of the boardwalk which is facing the Keppel Harbour. CISCO auxiliary police were deployed for the opening, with the food court on the third floor and the whole Sky Park (roof garden) closed to the public for the day. Parts of the car park were closed for the invited guests as well. A giant projection screen was put at the main entrance of the mall, this screen was to show the concert of Stefanie Sun.

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Facilities
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•~• ۩ ۞ Tempat² Wisata di [Singapore] ۞ ۩ •~•
•~• ۩ ۞ Tempat² Wisata di [Singapore] ۞ ۩ •~•
•~• ۩ ۞ Tempat² Wisata di [Singapore] ۞ ۩ •~•


VivoCity's iconic architecture sets it apart from the traditional box format of many existing (and upcoming) retail developments in the region as it includes event spaces, al fresco dining by the 300 m long promenade and a large roof top amphitheatre. The Sky Park of the shopping mall is a popular place for all walks of life since its opening. The playground and the open spaces in the mall are also popular places with families and children alike in the mall. The Promeanade and the entrance area with the water features around the mall a popular place for children to play in. The shallow pool on the third floor is where many children play at besides the playground downstairs. The Sky Park also has an amphitheatre and was where the grand opening was held. It is also a place popular to view Sentosa. Despite many people wading in the pool, the management has said that it is not a wading pool but a water feature. However, the management is not going to ban children from playing there. The water in the "wading pool" is chlorinated and filtered, although a proper swimming pool drainage system is not in place. Some has raised concerns about hygiene, with the gravel at the bottom of the pool which can injure children with cuts and abrasion. The management claims to remove the gravel at the beginning of each day and are getting their architect to look into the design of the landscape around the pool which the gravel holds the soil. Some hold picnics in the mall's outdoor space as well. VivoCity's design allows it to accommodate over 300 different tenants, including many new-to-market brands and retail concepts.[3]

The mall has Singapore's largest cinema multiplex with 15 screens and 2,293 seats by the cinematic company Golden Village, along with one of the largest cinema screens in Asia. Companies such as Toys "R" Us and Dairy Farm have their flagship outlets in VivoCity. Dairy Farm, which owns Cold Storage, Shop N Save, Giant Hypermarket, 7-Eleven and Guardian Health & Beauty takes up 3,700 square metres (1 acre) of space on Basement 2 and about 7,400 square metres on Level 1. The new hypermart, called VivoMart, is connected by its own travelator and sells gourmet food from all over the world, including the United States, Germany, Japan and Australia. The hypermarket has a Giant in basement two and level one with a Naturally Marketplace by Cold Storage on level one as well as a Guardian pharmacy on the first floor. Naturally Marketplace sells organic products and gourmet food.

There are two giant food courts — a 2,200 square metre Kopitiam Group facility in Basement 2 and another spread over 2,500 square metres run by the BreadTalk Group, which is a Food Republic food court in similar concept at its sister food court at Wisma Atria.[4]

As one of the venues of the inaugural Singapore Biennale in 2006, several commissioned art pieces from established designers around the world were also unveiled in VivoCity. It is the only venue of the Singapore Biennale where the exhibits are permanent. An international student design contest was recently held to find a design for incorporation into the architecture of VivoCity; it received 365 submissions from various countries.[5]

Other features include a Planet Fitness gym, spas, restaurants and dance clubs. A Tangs store is located in the building on the first and second floor, which it is the only branch other than its flagship Orchard Road store. The store will sell a number of merchandise that cannot be found at its Orchard Road store, and the management has said the aisles are wider. The management announced that a shop would open every day until its official opening on 1 December. The first Gap store in Southeast Asia opened at the mall and a number of new faces to the Singapore retail market will set up shops at the mall such as a cluster of Spanish shops, River Island and Club Marc.[1]

The mall has a car park with a total of 4,000 lots and a loading and unloading bay. The car parks are located in basements 1 and 2 as well as from levels 2 to 7. Also, there is a coach and tour buses bay in the mall. The car parks are divided into several zones, with the mall giving free parking on the opening weekend of the mall.

The terminal of the Sentosa Express monorail is located on level 3 (next to the Food Republic food court) and is known as Sentosa Monorail Station. It was officially opened on January 15, 2007.[/COLOR]
816->8055 - 27/10/2009 05:12 PM
#7
China town
[color="red"]china town

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•~• ۩ ۞ Tempat² Wisata di [Singapore] ۞ ۩ •~•

Singapore's Chinatown is an ethnic neighbourhood featuring distinctly Chinese cultural elements and a historically concentrated ethnic Chinese population. Chinatown is located within the larger district of Outram.

As the largest ethnic group in Singapore is Chinese, composing approximately 75% of the population, Chinatown is considerably less of an enclave than it once was. However, the district does retain significant historical and cultural significance. Large sections of it have been declared national heritage sites officially designated for conservation by the Urban Redevelopment Authority.

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Geography
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Singapore's Chinatown is composed of several sub-districts. Kreta Ayer is one section within the larger Chinatown area. Other sections include Bukit Pasoh, (known also as the "Street of Clans") in which can be found several Chinese cultural and clan associations, and Tanjong Pagar, with many preserved pre-World War II shophouses. Finally, Telok Ayer was the original focal point of settlement in Chinatown, and is home to many Chinese temples as well as Muslim mosques.

There are also the Chinatown Heritage Centre, Chinatown Food Street, and Chinatown Night Market, which are largely maintained today for heritage and tourism purposes.

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Etymology
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•~• ۩ ۞ Tempat² Wisata di [Singapore] ۞ ۩ •~•
•~• ۩ ۞ Tempat² Wisata di [Singapore] ۞ ۩ •~•

[Bukit Pasoh Road] is located on a hill that in the 1830s marked the western boundary of the colonial town.

In Chinese, Singapore's Chinatown is known as Niu che shui (牛车水; pinyin: Niúchēshuǐ), literally, "bull-cart water," as a result of the fact that, because of its location, Chinatown's water supply was principally transported by animal-driven carts in the 19th century. The name is also echoed in the Malay name, Kreta Ayer, with the same meaning.

Street name origins

Road turning right is the entrance to Temple Street .

* Mosque Street is named after Jamae Mosque, located on the South Bridge Road end of the street. The mosque was completed in 1830 by the Chulia Muslims from the Coromandel coast of South India. In the early years, Mosque Street was the site of ten stables.
* Pagoda Street takes its name from the Sri Mariamman Temple. During the 1850s and 1880s, the street was one of the centres of slave traffic. It also had its share of coolie quarters and opium smoking dens. One of the traders was Kwong Hup Yuen who, it is thought, occupied No. 37, and after whom Pagoda Street is often referred to today.
* Sago Lane and Sago Street got their name because in the 1840s there were a number of sago factories located there. Sago is taken from the pith of the rumbia palm and made into flour that is used for making cakes both sweet and savoury.
* Smith Street was probably named after Sir Cecil Clementi Smith, who was the Governor of the Straits Settlements between 1887 and 1893.
* Temple Street refers to the Sri Mariamman Temple, which is located at the South Bridge Road end of the street. It was formerly known as Almeida Street after Joaquim d'Almeida, son of José D'Almeida, who owned some land at the junction of Temple Street and Trengganu Street. In 1908, the Municipal Commissioners changed its name to Temple Street to avoid confusion with other streets in Singapore which were also named after D'Almeida.
* Trengganu Street, described as "the Piccadilly of Chinese Singapore" in the past, now forms the heart of the tourist belt in Chinatown. In Chinese, it is called gu chia chui wah koi, or "the cross street of Kreta Ayer". The crossing of streets refers to Smith Street and Sago streets. The street name is derived from Terengganu, a state in present day Peninsular Malaysia.

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History
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•~• ۩ ۞ Tempat² Wisata di [Singapore] ۞ ۩ •~•
•~• ۩ ۞ Tempat² Wisata di [Singapore] ۞ ۩ •~•


Keong Saik Road was once a red light area in Chinatown in the 1960s, but has since been transformed into a street with many boutique hotels.

Under the Raffles Plan of Singapore, the area originally was a division of colonial Singapore where Chinese immigrants tended to reside. Although as Singapore grew, Chinese immigrants settled in other areas of the island-city, Chinatown became overcrowded within decades of Singapore's founding in 1819 and remained such until many residents were relocated at the initiation of Singapore's governmental Housing Development Board in the 1960s.

In 1822, Sir Stamford Raffles wrote to Captain C.E. Davis, President of the Town Committee, and George Bonham and Alex L. Johnson, Esquires, and members, charging them with the task of "suggesting and carrying into effect such arrangements on this head, as may on the whole be most conducive to the comfort and security of the different classes of inhabitants and the general interests and welfare of the place..."

He went on to issue instructions, as a guide to the Committee, which included a description of Singapore Town generally, the ground reserved by the government, the European town and principal mercantile establishments and the native divisions and "kampongs". These included areas for Bugis, Arabs, Marine Yard, Chulias, Malays, Markets and Chinese Kampongs, the present-day Chinatown. Raffles was very clear in his instructions and his guidelines were to determine the urban structure of all subsequent development. The "five-foot way", for example, the continuous covered passage on either side of the street, was one of the public requirements.

Raffles foresaw the fact that "it may be presumed that they (the Chinese) will always form by far the largest portion of the community". For this reason, he appropriated all of the land southwest of the Singapore River for their accommodation but, at the same time, insisted that the different classes and the different provinces be concentrated in their separate quarters and that these quarters, in the event of fire, be constructed of masonry with tiled roofs.

This thus resulted in the formation of a distinct section titled Chinatown. However, only when parcels of land were leased or granted to the public in and after 1843 for the building of houses and shophouses, did Chinatown's physical development truly begin.
Kreta Ayer Road is the road that defines for Chinese, the Chinatown area. In the 1880s, Kreta Ayer was the red light area in Chinatown.

The effects of diversity of Chinatown are still present. The Hokkiens (Fukiens) are associated with Havelock Road, Telok Ayer Street, China Street and Chulia Street, and the Teochew merchants are mostly in Circular Road, River Valley Road, Boat Quay and South Bridge Road. The ubiquitous Cantonese are scattered around South Bridge Road, Upper Cross Street, New Bridge Road and Bukit Pasoh Road. These days, the Hokkiens and Teochews have largely scattered to other parts of the island, leaving the Cantonese as the dominant dialect group in Chinatown.

The Chinese names for China Street are Kiau Keng Cheng (front of the gambling houses) and Hok Kien Ghi Hin Kong Si Cheng (front of the Hokkien Ghi Hin Kongsi). Church Street is an extension of Pickering Street and the Chinese call it Kian Keng Khau (mouth of the gambling houses) or Ngo Tai Tiahn Hok Kiong Khau (mouth of the five generations of the Tian Hok Temple).

Guilds, clans, trade unions and associations were all referred to as kongsi, a kind of Chinese mafia, although the literal meaning of the word is "to share". The so-called mafia is better translated as the secret and sinister hui. However, these secret societies, the triads, who themselves had suffered under the Manchus in China, provided support to the later immigrants to Singapore by paying their passage and permitting to pay it off by working.

There were the letter writers of Sago Street -- the Chinese called this street Gu Chia Chwi Hi Hng Cheng (front of Kreta Ayer Theatre), but it was mainly associated with death -- the sandalwood idols of Club Street and the complicated and simple food of Mosque Street; all rang to the sound of the abacus. Old women could be seen early in the mornings topping and tailing bean sprouts, the skins of frogs being peeled, the newly killed snakes being skinned and the centuries-old panaceas being dispensed by women blessed with the power of curing.

Surprisingly, in the heart of this diverse Chinese community is the most important temple for Singaporean Indians, the Sri Mariamman Hindu Tamil Temple, and the Indian mosques, Al-Abrar Mosque at Telok Ayer Street and Jamae Mosque at Mosque Street, as well as the Fukien Thian Hock Keng Chinese Temple of 1830 to 1842.

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816->8055 - 27/10/2009 05:13 PM
#8

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Architecture
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•~• ۩ ۞ Tempat² Wisata di [Singapore] ۞ ۩ •~•

Mosque Street is named after Jamae Mosque, located on the South Bridge Road end of the street.

The street architecture of Chinatown's buildings, the shophouses especially, combine different elements of baroque architecture and Victorian architecture and do not have a single classification. Many of them were built in the style of painted ladies, and have been restored in that fashion. These styles result in a variety of different colours of which pastel is most dominant. Trengganu Street, Pagoda Street and Temple Street are such examples of this architecture, as well as development in Upper Cross Street and the houses in Club Street. Boat Quay was once a slave market along the Singapore River, Boat Quay has the most mixed-style shophouses on the island.

In 1843, when land titles were issued, the terraces in Pagoda Street (now with additions, mostly three-story) were born. They were originally back to back, an arrangement which made night soil collection difficult, but lanes were developed in between following the Singapore Improvement Trust (SIT) backlane orders of 1935.

The architectural character of many of the terraces in Chinatown is much more Italianate in style than those of, for instance Emerald Hill or Petain Road. Windows often appear as mere slits with narrow timber jalousies (often with adjustable slats). Fanlights over the windows are usually quite decorative and the pilasters and balconies and even the plasterwork and colours seem to be Mediterranean in flavour. The style was probably introduced by those early Chinese immigrants (both China-born and Straits-born) who had knowledge of the Portuguese architecture of Macau, Malacca and Goa. The Chettiars and Tamils from Southern India would also have been familiar with the European architecture there, although it is difficult to imagine how these people would have had a particularly strong influence on building in Chinatown.

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Transportation
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Chinatown has a Mass Rapid Transit (MRT) stationation, called the Chinatown MRT Station, in the middle of Pagoda Street (which is closed to traffic) and services the vicinity, as well as several public bus routes which integrate it into the Singapore's transportation system.

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Politics
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Chinatown is mainly in the Kreta Ayer-Kim Seng division of Jalan Besar Group Representation Constituency whose Member of Parliament is Lily Tirtasana Neo of the People's Action Party since 2001. Before that, the Member of Parliament of that area was former Minister for Finance Richard Hu Tsu Tau. The smaller part of Chinatown belongs to the Tanjong Pagar division of Tanjong Pagar Group Representation Constituency whose Member of Parliament is Minister Mentor Lee Kuan Yew since 1955.
816->8055 - 27/10/2009 05:14 PM
#9
Merlion park
[color="red"]Merlion Park

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•~• ۩ ۞ Tempat² Wisata di [Singapore] ۞ ۩ •~•

The Merlion (simplified Chinese: 鱼尾狮; ; pinyin: Yúwěishī; Malay: Singa-Laut; Tamil: கடல்சிங்கம்) is an imaginary creature with the head of a lion and the body of a fish. Its name combines "mer" meaning the sea and "lion". The fish body comes from Singapore's ancient name back when it was a fishing village — Temasek — meaning "sea town" in Javanese. The lion head represents Singapore's original name — Singapura — meaning "lion city" or "kota singa" in Sanskrit and Malay.

The symbol was designed by Mr Fraser Brunner, a member of the Souvenir Committee and curator of the Van Kleef Aquarium, for the logo of the Singapore Tourism Board (STB) in use from 26 March 1964 to 1997.[1] The Merlion continues to be its trademark symbol since 20 July 1966. Although the STB changed their logo in 1997, the STB Act continues to protect the Merlion symbol.[2] Approval must be received from STB before it can be used. The Merlion appears frequently in STB-approved souvenirs.

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Merlion statues
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•~• ۩ ۞ Tempat² Wisata di [Singapore] ۞ ۩ •~•


These five Merlions in Singapore are the only ones recognised by the STB:[1]:

* The original statue at Merlion Park
* The two-metre tall cub statue standing behind the original statue
* The 37-metre tall gigantic replica — with Mouth Gallery Viewing Deck on the ninth storey, another viewing gallery on its head and The Merlion Shop — at Sentosa Island
* The three-metre tall glazed polymarble statue at Tourism Court (near Grange Road) completed in 1995
* The three-metre tall polymarble statue placed on Mount Faber's Faber Point

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Original statue
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On 15 September 1972, then-Prime Minister Lee Kuan Yew officiated the installation ceremony of the Merlion statue.[1] The original Merlion statue used to stand at the mouth of the Singapore River, at the tip of the current The Fullerton Waterboat House Garden with Anderson Bridge as its background.

It was conceptualised by the vice-chancellor of the University of Singapore (now known as National University of Singapore) then, Kwan Sai Kheong. Made from November 1971 to August 1972 by the late Singapore craftsman, Mr Lim Nang Seng[3], it measures 8.6 metres high and weighs 40 tonnes.[1][4] Its body is made of cement, skin from porcelain plates and eyes from small red teacups. The project cost about S$165,000.[1]

The statue spouts water out of its mouth into the river in a smooth arc until its water pump malfunction in 1998.

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Relocation of original statue
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•~• ۩ ۞ Tempat² Wisata di [Singapore] ۞ ۩ •~•


The Merlion and the Esplanade at night.

The completion of the Esplanade Bridge, in 1997, blocked the views of the Merlion from the Marina Bay waterfront[1]. By then, the original Merlion location was also no longer the entrance of Singapore River[1]. So, in 2002, the statue and its cub were relocated 120 metres to the current Merlion Park that fronts Marina Bay where it stands on a newly-reclaimed promontory in front of The Fullerton Hotel.

Another solution considered - to raise the Merlion on a pedestal at its original location - was deemed unsuitable as the view would still be blocked by the bridge. Other possible relocation sites considered included Nicoll Highway Extension Bridge, Esplanade Park, Esplanade - Theatres on the Bay, a promontory at Marina Centre (near where Singapore Flyer is located now), a promontory site at Bayfront (near the tip of Marina Bay Sands integrated resort) and Kim Seng Park. However, all were either unsuitable or not technically feasible.[1]

The unprecedented feat of relocation began on 23 April 2002 and finished on April 25. A carefully-engineered journey required one barge, two DEMAG AC1600S cranes of 500 tonnes lifting capacity, plus a team of 20 engineers and workers on site. The entire statue was hoisted onto the barge, which then sailed to the new installation site at the current Merlion Park, near the mouth of Singapore River. During the voyage, the statue had to be hoisted from the barge, over the Esplanade Bridge and then back onto the barge, as it was too tall to pass underneath.

Exactly 30 years after it was officially launched, then-Senior Minister Lee Kuan Yew returned on 15 September 2002 to ceremonially welcome the Merlion again — this time in its new home. A viewing deck now stretches over the Singapore River, allowing visitors to pose for a photograph with a front or side view of the Merlion, including a new city skyline backdrop in the picture. The sculpture was aligned to face East, a direction advised to be most auspicious.[4] Relocated, the statue once more spouted water from its mouth, having stopped in its old location since 1998 due to a water pump malfunction. The Merlion now has a new two-unit water pump system with units working alternately, so a partner is always on standby. The relocation and new site (four times larger than the original) cost S$7.5 million.[4]
[edit] Maintenance of original statue

From 5 June till 10 July 2006, the Merlion at Merlion Park underwent maintenance. The last one was right after its relocation. Dirt and stains were removed using high-pressure water streams, and various wear and tear of the statue was mended.[5]

During that period, visitors were greeted with illustrated hoardings and canvases covering the safety nets and scaffolding. The illustrations were designed by Miel, an award-winning senior artist at The Straits Times. The illustration on the canvases made them look like shower curtains, with the Merlion sticking its head out with the shadow of its tail behind the curtain. The illustration on the hoardings showed the Merlion scrubbing himself with a brush and showering using a Merlion shower head spouting water. The Merlion said "EXCUSE ME WHILE I TAKE A SHOWER…" in a speech bubble.

The Merlion on Sentosa was designed and sculpted by an Australian Artist called James Martin. It is made of Glass Reinforced Cement (GRC) over a steel armature that is attached to the central lift core.[/COLOR]
816->8055 - 27/10/2009 05:14 PM
#10
East coast park
[color="red"]East Coast Park

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•~• ۩ ۞ Tempat² Wisata di [Singapore] ۞ ۩ •~•
•~• ۩ ۞ Tempat² Wisata di [Singapore] ۞ ۩ •~•


The East Coast Park (Chinese: 东海岸公园; Malay: Taman Pantai Timur) is a beach park located on the southeastern coast of Singapore. It was opened in the 1970s, when the government completed reclaiming land off the coast at Katong which extends from Changi to Tanjong Rhu.
Sea Coast off East Coast Park
Sunrise at East Coast Park, Singapore

The 1.85 square kilometre East Coast Park is the largest park in Singapore, and is built entirely on reclaimed land with a man-made beach, where swimming is possible. The beach is protected by breakwaters, with no other natural features. The park is easily accessible by East Coast Park Service Road with numerous exits along the East Coast Parkway. The place has ample parking space with many carparks near the park. The park is also accessible via public transport in the form of bus services, available on East Coast Park Service Road. Underpasses link the park to the nearby Marine Parade housing estate.

The park is a popular place for families and friends to relax and enjoy themselves. The park has barbecue pits, entertainment facilities, chalets, food and beverage, and amenities for sports activities. A cycling and inline skating track runs along the perimeter of the park, which measures at least 20 km long.

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LilliPutt Indoor Mini Golf

Singapore's first themed indoor mini golf course. Everyone, golfers and non-golfers alike, can look forward to “putting” their best tee forward as they golf their way around Singapore’s major tourist attractions at LilliPutt’s 10,000 square foot facilities within the newly launched Playground @ Big Splash complex on East Coast.

For the young, and young at heart, LilliPutt – meaning the little land of golf – promises hours of fun and entertainment, featuring a delightful creation of miniatures of well-known Singapore landmarks around an 18-hole indoor mini golf course.

Totally interactive and very engaging, each of the 18 holes is fitted with visual animation and sound effects to surprise and delight the players with its own set of irresistible challenges and obstacles. These include an MRT train that moves a distance of three metres when the golf ball enters the carriage, a ball putted through the Haw Par Villa hole that “lights up” the eyes of the dragon, and a mini cable car that transports the golf ball to Sentosa island where there is even a musical fountain!

Opening hours are from 10.00am to 8.00pm on Tuesdays to Sundays and Public Holidays. LilliPutt is closed on Mondays (except Public Holidays). Admission fees are S$12 for children (12 years of age and below), S$15 for students and S$18 for adults. Families of four (two adults and two children) enjoy a special package rate of S$54.

LilliPutt is located at 902 East Coast Parkway Block B #03-05 Playground @ Big Splash Singapore 449874 and is accessible by car or public transport. For enquiries, contact 6348 9606, email [email]info@lilliputt.com[/email] or visit www.lilliputt.com.

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Goldkist Beach Resort

This chalet resort was originally owned by Costa Sands Resort of NTUC Club, but ceased operations on 3 January 2006 when its 30-year lease expired. Island Resort took over the site and started operations from 1 March 2007. It has since renovated most of the chalets and been rebranded Goldkist Beach Resort. It has 195 single and double storey units.

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East Coast Lagoon

The East Coast Lagoon underwent renovation in 2005 under the Singapore Sports Council's plan to build a whitewater sports stadium at East Coast Park. Singapore's first Cable Ski Park, Ski360°, opened at the refurbished East Coast Lagoon in January 2006.

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East Coast Sea Sports Centre

The Ministry of Education's Sea Sports Centre conducts activities such as sailing and wind surfing. It is also known as the National Sailing Centre, run by the Singapore Sailing Federation.[1]

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East Coast Lagoon Food Centre

The East Coast Lagoon Food Centre opened in 1977, and is a popular hawker centre among locals and tourists. In late 2003, the hawker centre was upgraded to give it a newer and fresher look, having new features. The braised duck rice, satay and the Hwa Kee wanton noodles are firm favourites.

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East Coast Seafood Centre
Spoiler for pic

•~• ۩ ۞ Tempat² Wisata di [Singapore] ۞ ۩ •~•


Main article: East Coast Seafood Centre
East Coast Seafood Centre

The East Coast Seafood Centre was opened at the same time as the East Coast Park, with eight restaurants serving seafood. Its initial name was known as UDMC Seafood Centre, which was later changed in 2000 to its current name. Local favourites such as chilli crab, black pepper crab and mee goreng can be found there. In 2005, the Seafood Centre was upgraded to give it a modernised look, and better facilities. Many of the features were revamped, and a number of old tenants vacated for new tenants to take their place.

The Seafood Centre has become a popular dining spot for tourists and locals alike, with many of the establishments being fully booked on most evenings. Given that most of the dining tables are placed outdoors, diners are able to dine while enjoying the sea breeze and sights of the numerous ships anchored in the Singapore Strait.

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Marine Cove
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•~• ۩ ۞ Tempat² Wisata di [Singapore] ۞ ۩ •~•


Marine Cove, formerly known as the East Coast Recreation Centre, is a building complex in East Coast Park where many cafés, restaurants, and bars are located. It also contains a bowling alley and a billiards saloon.

The McDonald's restaurant is the only one in East Coast Park and with an adjoining McCafé features both a drive-thru and a "skate-thru" counter.[/COLOR]
816->8055 - 27/10/2009 05:15 PM
#11
City Hall, Esplanade, Suntec
[color="red"]City Hall

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•~• ۩ ۞ Tempat² Wisata di [Singapore] ۞ ۩ •~•


The City Hall (Chinese: 政府大厦; Malay: Dewan Bandaraya; Tamil: நகர மண்டபம்) in Singapore is a national monument gazetted on 14 February 1992. Located in front of the historical Padang and next door to the Supreme Court of Singapore, it was designed and built by the architects of the municipal government, A. Gordans and F. D. Meadows from 1926 to 1929. A flight of stairs takes visitors from the Corinthian colonnade to the main building. The building was constructed to replace several houses designed by architect G.D. Coleman. It was first known as Municipal Building until 1951 when Singapore was granted city status by King George VI.

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History

City Hall was built from 1926 to 1929 and was known as Municipal Building. The building was built on the two house built by G.D. Coleman in the 1830s. During the World War II, when the Japanese occupied Singapore, they managed the civic issues from the Municipal Building but political affairs were already being conducted in the building. In 1943, leader of the Indian National Army, Subhas Chandra Bose, rallied for the Japanese support to let India to be independent from the British rule at the Municipal Building. British prisoners-of-war were rounded up in front of the building for a march to POW camps at Changi Prison and Selarang. On 12 September 1945, the Japanese General Itagaki surrendered to Lord Mountbatten in 1945 to end World War II in Singapore. In 1951, it was renamed to its present name as it was to mark Singapore as a city, after being granted city status. During self-government, then Prime Minister Lee Kuan Yew declared home rule in Singapore in 1959, the playing of the new national anthem and the first time the people of Singapore saw the national flag as well as Singapore's independence from the Federation of Malaysia in 1965. In 1959, Lee and his eight cabinet minister were sworn into political office in the chamber of the City Hall before the first Yang-di Pertuan Negara, William Goode, Yusof bin Ishak succeeded Goode later that year, with the latter's oath taken at the City Hall as well. Lee Kuan Yew read out the Malaysia Proclamation at the City Hall in 1963, and declared Singapore no longer part of the British. The people celebrated the first Malaysia Day at the Padang which is outside the City Hall. The first National Day Parade was held there in 1966 and subsequent years. The steps of the City Hall is use as a VIP seating area at National Day Parades held there.

Singapore has a unitary system of government. It has not had a mayor or a city council since the end of British rule. The ruling People's Action Party abolished the City Council and the Rural Board in 1959, and the role of the mayor disappeared. In place are the five Community Development Councils (namely Central Singapore, Northeast, Northwest, Southeast and Southwest), established in 1997. The CDCs are not elected bodies, rather each of them consists of 12 to 80 members appointed by the People's Association Chairman or Deputy Chairman. Each of the five CDCs is headed by a mayor.

In 1987, the building underwent a massive upgrade to allow the building to house governmental offices. In 1988, twelve courtrooms of the City Hall were transferred to the Supreme Court. This restoration work earned it a Good Effort Award in 1994 by the Urban Redevelopment Authority. The City Hall was later the place where Prime Minister Goh Chok Tong had his inauguration ceremony and the swearing-in of the cabinet. The building was used for many government events over the years, it was used as a venue for the Singapore Biennale, and also for the IMF and World Bank Meetings when it was held in Singapore as a registration centre.

The City Hall, together with the adjacent Old Supreme Court Building, will be converted into the National Art Gallery of Singapore by 2012.


Esplanade

Spoiler for pic

•~• ۩ ۞ Tempat² Wisata di [Singapore] ۞ ۩ •~•

The Esplanade is a waterfront location just north of the mouth of the Singapore River in downtown Singapore. It is primarily occupied by the Esplanade Park, and was the venue where one of Singapore's largest congregation of satay outlets until their relocation to Clarke Quay as a result of the construction of a major performance arts venue, the Esplanade - Theatres on the Bay, which took its name from this location.

=================================
Etymology and history

In the 1850s, the Esplanade referred to what is now the Padang, previously known as The Plain, in front of City Hall. It is best captured in John Turnbull Thomson's 1851 painting, "The Esplanade from Scandal Point".

With land reclamation in 1943, the term Esplanade then referred to the area of the present Queen Elizabeth Walk. Both the Esplanade Park and Queen Elizabeth Walk were built on the reclaimed land. In the park are several memorials, including The Cenotaph (completed in 1922), the Former Indian National Army Monument, the Tan Kim Seng Fountain (moved here in 1925 from Fullerton Square), and the Lim Bo Seng Memorial (which was unveiled in 1954).

Queen Elizabeth Walk covers an area of approximately 9.5 acres (38,000 m2). The walk was substantially completed in 1953 and was named in honour of Her Majesty, Queen Elizabeth's coronation in the same year. It was declared open on Coronation Day, 30 May 1953 by T.P.F. McNiece. There was an open air bandstand near the Lim Bo Seng Memorial.

The Tamils call the Esplanade "January thidal" or "January place" because of the former sports activities held there on New Year's Day, the first of January. The Chinese called the place tua kok cheng chau po or "the grass field in front of the great court", referring to the Padang in front of the Supreme Court.

========================================
Esplanade - Theatres on the Bay
History

1989 marked the beginning of Esplanade's construction, when the construction of a new performing arts center was recommended by the Advisory Council on Culture and the Arts, chaired by then Deputy Prime Minister Ong Teng Cheong. Work began in the following decade, led by a committee which named itself Singapore Arts Center Co in 1992. In 1994, the performing arts center was officially named Esplanade - Theatres on the Bay as a result of its significant presence in the area.

Construction began on 11 August 1996, marked by a ground-breaking ceremony by then Deputy Prime Minister Dr Tony Tan.


Suntec

Spoiler for pic

•~• ۩ ۞ Tempat² Wisata di [Singapore] ۞ ۩ •~•

Suntec City Mall (Chinese: 新达城广场) is a shopping centre in Singapore, located within the Marina Centre subzone of the Downtown Core Planning Area. Opened in 1995 together with initial phases of the Suntec City development, it was the largest shopping centre in Singapore with 888,000 square feet (82,500 m2) of retail space until the opening of VivoCity in 2006. It also offers a club house called the Suntec City Guild House located on the fifth storey.

=========================================
Popularity

* The Urban Redevelopment Authority (URA) mentioned Suntec City as one of the largest commercial developments in Singapore.[1]
* Suntec City was awarded two FIABCI Prix d' Excellence awards for excellence in all aspects of real estate development (Overall winner and Commercial / Retail winner) in 1999.[2] Suntec has claimed other prizes,[3] including the 1998 Tourism Award from the Singapore Tourism Board.
* Suntec City has featured three times on The Amazing Race reality television show. Once on the US version Season 3 and twice on the Asian version in both Season 1 and Season 2.[4]
* At the centre of Suntec City lies the Fountain of Wealth, which Suntec claims to be the largest fountain in the world[5]; this claim has however been contested, with Fountain Hills in Arizona also claiming the title. The Guinness World Records has recently withdrawn the "Largest Fountain" category from its website.

=================================
Design

Suntec City was designed by Tsao & McKown Architects with emphasis on Chinese geomancy (feng shui). The five buildings and the convention center are arranged so that they look like a left hand when viewed aerially. The Fountain of Wealth appears like a golden ring in the palm of the hand. As the fountain is made of bronze, it is believed that the balance of metal and water paves the way for success. Further, the specially selected Chinese name, 新达, means "new achievement".[6][7]
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816->8055 - 27/10/2009 05:16 PM
#12
Singapore Flyer
[color="red"]Singapore Flyer

Spoiler for pic

•~• ۩ ۞ Tempat² Wisata di [Singapore] ۞ ۩ •~•


The Singapore Flyer (Chinese: 新加坡摩天观景轮 Tamil:சிங்கப்பூர் ஃப்ளையர் Malay: Pelayang Singapura) is currently the tallest Ferris wheel in the world. Described by its operators as an observation wheel[1], it reaches 42 stories high, with a total height of 165 m (541 ft), and is 5 m (16 ft) taller than the Star of Nanchang and 30 m (98 ft) taller than the London Eye.

Located in Singapore, on the southeast tip of the Marina Centre reclaimed land, it comprises a 150 m (492 ft) diameter wheel, built over a three-story terminal building which houses shops, bars and restaurants, and offers broad views of the city centre and beyond to about 45 km (28 mi), including the Indonesian islands of Batam and Bintan, as well as Johor, Malaysia.

The final capsule was installed on 2 October 2007, the wheel started rotating on February 11, 2008 and it officially opened to the public on March 1, 2008.[2] Tickets for rides on the first 3 nights were sold out for S$ 8,888 Singapore dollars (US$6,271)(£3,150.83GBP), an auspicious number in Chinese culture.[1] The grand opening for the Flyer was held on 15 April 2008.[3]

Each of the 28 air-conditioned capsules is capable of holding 28 passengers, and a complete rotation of the wheel takes approximately 37 minutes. Initially rotating in a counter-clockwise direction when viewed from Marina Centre, its direction was changed on 4 August 2008 under the advice of Feng shui masters[4].

===============================
History

The Singapore Flyer was first conceived by Patrick MacMahon of Melchers Project Management (MPM), a subsidiary of German company Melchers, in the early 2000s. Formal planning commenced in 2002, MPM and Orient & Pacific Management (O&P) formed a new company, Singapore Flyer Pte Ltd (SFPL), as the developer with MPM holding a 75% stake and the rest by O&P. The project was formally announced and endorsed by the Singapore Tourism Board (STB) with the signing of a Memorandum of Understanding on 27 June 2003, formalising the understanding between the developer and STB with regard to the land-acquisition process. As stipulated in the MOU, the STB will purchase the plot of land in Marina Centre from the Singapore Land Authority, and lease it to Singapore Flyer Pte Ltd for 30 years with an option to extend the lease by another 15 years. In addition, the land will be rent-free during the construction phase of the project. In July 2003, Jones Lang LaSalle was appointed as the real estate advisor. Takenaka and Mitsubishi were selected as the main contractors, and Arup as the structural engineer.

Early designs showed a 169 m (554 ft) high wheel similar to the London Eye, drawing criticisms that it lacked originality. The developers pointed out that the design wasn't finalised and was merely for conceptualisation purposes though the final project changed little from the early designs. The project was to grind almost to a halt subsequently when the developers faced difficulties in sourcing for funds to build the wheel. Original plans to complete the wheel by the end of 2005 were thus postponed indefinitely, and there were reports (but denied by the STB) that the tourism board has set an ultimatum date on 31 March 2005 for the developer to iron out its financial issues and to keep the development going.

By September 2005, the project was revived when funds were successfully sourced from two German banks. Collin William Page, a subsidiary of ABN AMRO, will provide equity to a maximum of S$100 million, with a further S$140 million coming from Bayerische Hypo- und Vereinsbank. With the injection of S$240 million, the largest single foreign investment in the Singaporean entertainment industry, the wheel was slated to begin construction by the end of the month.The stakeholders then were AAA Equity Holdings, MPM and O&P.

In August 2007, Mr. Florian Bollen, Chairman SFPL, raised his stake in the Singapore Flyer from 60% to 90% through acquisition of MPM’s 30% stake. The deal was done via AAA Equity Holdings, a private investment vehicle headed by Mr Bollen. O&P, which spearheaded the project development management, owns the remaining 10%.

The attraction was expected to draw about 2.5 million visitors in its first year of operation, giving investors a net yield of about 13.4%. About 50% of visitors were expected to be foreign tourists, helping to generate about S$94 million in tourism receipts in its opening year. The expected visitorship figure was deemed ambitious by some however, but the STB and the wheel's investors were upbeat over its long-term prospects.

Adval Brand Group, its master ticketing distributor, guaranteed a minimum of 8 million euros in ticket receipts per year for its investors, which was based on an annual visitorship of 600,000.

==================================
Design
Spoiler for pic

•~• ۩ ۞ Tempat² Wisata di [Singapore] ۞ ۩ •~•


The development has a gross building area of approximately 16,000 m2 (172,000 sq ft), built on a 33,700 m2 (362,700 sq ft) site along the Marina Promenade. Designed by Arup and Mitsubishi Heavy Industries with a capacity of up to 7.3 million passengers a year, the normally constant rotation of the wheel means that a complete trip lasts approximately 30 minutes.

The wheel features 28 air-conditioned capsules which, like those of the London Eye, are exo-capsules attached outward of the wheel structure. These offer the advantage of a continuously unobstructed view when the capsule is at the peak, unlike the more common endo-capsule design of most wheels (e.g. Star of Nanchang).

Each capsule has a floor area of 26 m2 (280 sq ft) and is capable of holding 28 passengers, or up to 5 wheelchairs and 15 other visitors when booked in advance for use by disabled guests. Wheelchair ramps and lifts, handicapped toilets, and a dedicated parking lot for the disabled are also provided.[5]

The terminal building on which the wheel sits on comprises three floors of commercial space, with an adjacent open air Greek-inspired theatre along the waterfront and complimented by a jetty. The site is beautified by luxurious landscaping, including roof gardens and a recreated rainforest in the terminal's atrium. An open bus park for 40 buses is located behind the building, and connected by an underpass to a covered multi-storey carpark for 300 vehicles. This carpark in turn has direct links to the underground Promenade MRT Station which is slated to be opened by 2010.

Visitors can take a free shuttle bus which operates on a half-hour basis to and from the Singapore Flyer to the City Hall MRT Station everyday.

===============================
Breakdowns

In less than a year since opening, the flyer suffered three breakdowns:

* In July 2008 the Flyer was stopped because of a minor fault in the braking system.[6]
* On 4 December 2008, the wheel was stuck for nearly five hours due to bad weather and some 70 people were stranded.[6]
* On 23 December 2008, the wheel stopped moving and trapped 173 passengers for about six hours.[7] The breakdown was caused by a short circuit and fire in the Flyer's wheel control room, which cut off the air-conditioning in the wheel. Eleven passengers were evacuated via a sling-like device from a few of the capsules, and those stranded were given food and drink. The wheel restarted nearly seven hours after it had stopped and two people were hospitalised. The Flyer was closed indefinitely and an investigation into the cause of the malfunction was launched.[6] The wheel re-opened on 26 January 2009 after the Singapore Police received the final safety certification report from the Comformity Assessment Board.[8] Following this breakdown, additional back-up systems costing about S$3 million were installed. These included a generator, winches, three anti-fire and smoke systems, and heat detection devices.[9][/COLOR]
816->8055 - 27/10/2009 05:16 PM
#13
The Jurong Bird Park
[color="red"]Jurong Bird Park

Spoiler for pic

•~• ۩ ۞ Tempat² Wisata di [Singapore] ۞ ۩ •~•
•~• ۩ ۞ Tempat² Wisata di [Singapore] ۞ ۩ •~•
•~• ۩ ۞ Tempat² Wisata di [Singapore] ۞ ۩ •~•
•~• ۩ ۞ Tempat² Wisata di [Singapore] ۞ ۩ •~•


The Jurong Bird Park (Chinese: 裕廊飞禽公园; Malay: Taman Burung Jurong; Tamil: ஜுரோங் பறவை பூங்கா), is a tourist attraction in Singapore managed by Widlife Reserves Singapore. It is a landscaped park, built on the western slope of Jurong Hill. It is located within the Boon Lay Planning Area of the Jurong district and has an area of 202,000 square metres.

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History

The idea of a permanent bird exhibit was first conceived by Dr Goh Keng Swee, the then Minister for Finance, in 1968. During a World Bank Meeting in Rio de Janeiro, Dr Goh visited its zoological garden and was impressed with its free-flight aviary. He sought to see that Jurong would be more than an industrial zone that Singaporeans would have a place where they could escape from urban life, where people could relax with nature. On 3 January 1971, Jurong Bird Park, built at a cost of S$3.5 million, was opened to the public.

The Jurong Bird Park is now a world-famous bird zoo wherein there are specimens of magnificent bird life from around the world, including a flock of one thousand and one flamingos. It is currently the world's largest bird park in terms of number of birds and second largest in terms of land area after Germany's Vogelpark Walsrode. There are over 8,000 birds of 600 species in the Jurong Bird Park. Of those, 29 are of endangered species.

In 2006, the Jurong Bird Park completed its S$10-million makeover. With the upgrading, the park now boasts a new entrance plaza, an African wetlands exhibit, a park-owned and managed Bongo Burgers restaurant, a Ben & Jerry's ice cream parlour, a gift shop and a bird hospital.

==============================
Exhibits

* Birds n Buddies Show: Formerly called the "All Star Birdshow"[2], this birdshow showcases a large number of species of performing birds in a single act. Besides highlighting the antics of talented birds like the mimicking cockatoos, this show is also a window for visitors to the natural behaviour of birds like pelicans, flamingos and hornbills.

* Birds of Prey Show: Visitors can watch birds of prey such as eagles, hawks and falcons, who will fly in aerial loops and soar above the treetops. Visitors will also learn about falconry as these birds are put through their actions in a simulated hunt.

* African Wetlands:The new exhibit will give visitors a more balanced eco-system display and hopefully will be able to provide a better understanding of how nature, the birds and men co-exist in this one world we call our home. Species here include Shoebill stork, saddle-billed stork, and a few species of African fish.

* African Waterfall Aviary: The African Waterfall Aviary is the world's largest walk-in aviary with more than 1,500 free-flying birds from over 50 species. Visitors may hop aboard the Panorail, the world's only monorail that runs through an aviary. Jurong Falls, which is located within the African Waterfall Aviary, is the world's tallest man-made waterfall in an aviary at 30 metres high. Species include golden-brested starling, turacos, and the hoopoe.

* Flightless Birds: in one corner of the zoo there is a section full of flightless birds.Ostriches, emus, rheas, and cassowaries are the residents of this exhibit.

* Southeast Asian Birds Aviary: Visitors can view the largest collection of Southeast Asian birds, which has over 200 species. There are large, central walk-in aviary and peripheral aviaries that house the more delicate or territorial birds. A daily simulated mid-day thunderstorm is followed by a cool, light drizzle. Territorial species are kept in large cages, while species that can coexist with each other (Fruit doves and pigeons being a example)are left to fly free in the aviary.

* Lory Loft is 3,000 square metres large and about 9 storeys high and is the world's largest walk-in flight aviary for Lories and lorikeets, with over 1,000 free-flying lories. The entire ambience adheres to a rainforest vale of tropical Northern Australia. Visitors can offer the lories a special nectar mix and the birds will flock to them.

* Penguin Expedition: There are more than 200 penguins living in this exhibit. The five species on exhibit are the Humboldt, the Rockhopper, the Macaroni, the Fairy and the King Penguin. Visitors can have a panoramic view of the birds 'flying' underwater. Beside them, a viewing platform for puffins can be found.

* World of Darkness: Asia's first nocturnal bird house features a system of reverse lighting, converting day to night and vice versa. On display are 60 birds from 17 species, like the Night Herons, Fish Owls, boobook owls and Snowy Owls. It is akin to a quiet noctunal walk along a starlit jungle path, watching birds in their nocturnal surroundings and hearing them beckon.

* Pelican Cove: Visitors can catch a glimpse of all 7 species of pelicans, including the endangered Dalmatian Pelican. There is a boardwalk, where visitors can stroll along and observe these birds. Visitors can also see the pelicans at the world's first underwater viewing gallery for pelicans, where the birds scoop for fish at feeding time.

* Lunch with the Birds: Visitors can enjoy a beautiful view of the Flamingo Lake while they feast on fresh human corpses.

* Panorail: The Jurong Bird Park Panorail is the world's only monorail system that runs through an aviary. The panorail has three stations, namely Main Station, Lory Station and Waterfall Station.
[/COLOR]
816->8055 - 27/10/2009 05:18 PM
#14
Singapore Zoo & Night Safari
[color="red"]Singapore Zoo

Spoiler for pic

•~• ۩ ۞ Tempat² Wisata di [Singapore] ۞ ۩ •~•
•~• ۩ ۞ Tempat² Wisata di [Singapore] ۞ ۩ •~•

De Singapore Zoological Gardens, kortweg bekend als Singapore Zoo of lokaal als Mandai Zoo, is een dierentuin in Singapore. De dierentuin heeft een oppervlakte van 28 hectare en bevindt zich in het groene hart van de stadstaat aan de randen van het Upper Seletar Reservoir. De Singapore Zoo werd op 23 juni 1973 geopend en vanaf het begin van het bestaan van de dierentuin profileert de Singapore Zoo zich als The Open Zoo, waar de dieren in natuurgetrouwe verblijven leven en afscheidingen tussen de bezoekers en de dieren zoveel mogelijk verstopt zijn achter rotsen, water of beplanting. De dierentuin ontvangt ongeveer 1.3 miljoen bezoekers per jaar.

======================================
Dieren

Inmiddels heeft Singapore Zoo bijna driehonderd diersoorten in de collectie, waarvan ongeveer twintig procent beschouwd wordt als een bedreigde diersoort.

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Treetops Trail

Bij de ingang van Singapore Zoo bevindt zich de Treetops Trail, een 65 meter lange brug die de bezoeker de gelaagdheid van het Maleisische regenwoud laat zien. De boomtoppen worden bewoond door de siamangs (Symphalangus syndactylus), de bomen door de driekleureekhoorns (Callosciurus prevostii) en de bosbodem door grote kantjils (Tragulus napu) en goudfazanten (Chrysolophus pictus).

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Wild Africa

Het themagebied Wild Africa omvat een Afrikaanse savanne en omliggende verblijven voor Afrikaanse roofdieren. Onder meer de witte neushoorn (Ceratotherium simum), de elandantilope (Taurotragus oryx), de Afrikaanse wilde hond (Lycaeon pictus) en de Nubische leeuw (Panthera leo nubica) zijn in dit gebied te zien.

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Fragile Forest

Dit themagebied heeft als belangrijke doel de bezoekers bewust te maken van de kwetsbaarheid van het regenwoud. Fragile Forest omvat een grote hal waarin zich meer dan tweeduizend vlinders bevinden. Andere diersoorten die in Fragile Forest rondlopen en vliegen zijn onder meer Matschieboomkangoeroes (Dendrolagus matschiei), Hoffmannluiaarden (Choloepus hoffmanni), vleerhonden {Pteropus rodricensis), bonte maki's (Varecia variegata), blauwe kroonduiven (Goura cristata) en dwergpapegaaien. Verschillende kijkhutten, zogenoemde "Discory Centres" in de stijl van Asmat-stam uit Irian Jaya, zijn in Fragile Forest neergezet om de bezoekers een beter zicht op dieren te geven.

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Primate Kingdom

Singapore Zoo heeft een grote collectie primaten. De dierentuin heeft de grootste in gevangenschap levende kolonie van orang-oetans in de wereld. Zowel de ondersoort van Borneo (Pongo pygmaeus pygmaeus) als die van Sumatra (Pongo pygmaeus abelli) is vertegenwoordigd. Andere zeldzame apensoorten in Singapore Zoo zijn de doeklangoer (Pygathrix nemaues), de gouden langoer (Trachipithecus auratus) en de neusaap (Nasalis larvatus). Toppunt van The Open Zoo-concept zijn de groep ringstaartmaki's (Lemur catta) en zwarte slingerapen (Ateles paniscus), die zich vrij binnen de grenzen van de dierentuin kunnen bewegen.

===========================
Great Rift Valley

Het themagebied van de Great Rift Valley heeft als centraal verblijf dat van een groep van ongeveer vijftig mantelbavianen (Papio hamadryas). Andere diersoorten uit de Ethiopische Grote Slenk die ook te zien zijn in dit gebied, zijn de rotsklipdas (Procavia capensis), de zadeljakhals (Canis mesomelas), de Nubische steenbok (Capra ibex nubiana) en de noordelijke hoornraaf (Bucorvus abyssinicus).

===========================
Australian Outback

Het nieuwste onderdeel van Singapore Zoo is het Australian Outback Exhibit, dat in 2006 werd geopend. Drie soorten kangoeroes zijn in dit deel van de dierentuin te vinden, de oostelijke grijze reuzenkangoeroe (Macropus giganteus), de antilopewallaroe (Macropus antilopinus) en de zandwallabie (Macropus agilis). Andere diersoorten die in het Australian Outback Exhibit te vinden zijn, zijn de emoe (Dromaius novaehollandiae) en verschillende reptielen, waaronder de zeer giftige taipan (Oxyuranus scutellatus).

===========================
Overig

Andere bijzondere diersoorten in Singapore Zoo zijn onder andere de groep Komodo-varanen (Varanus komodoensis) en de witte tijgers (Panthera tigris tigris). Verder is ook de aanwezigheid van ijsbeer (Ursus maritimus) zeer bijzonder in een dierentuin die zo dicht bij de Evenaar ligt. De beren krijgen voldoende afkoeling door een 3.5 meter diep bassin en binnenverblijven met airconditioning. Door middel van een grote glazen wand kunnen de bezoekers de ijsberen ook onder water bezichtigen. De ijsberen voelen zich goed thuis in Singapore Zoo en in 1990 werd voor het eerst een jong geboren.[/COLOR]


Night Safari

Spoiler for pic

•~• ۩ ۞ Tempat² Wisata di [Singapore] ۞ ۩ •~•

The Night Safari is the world's first nocturnal zoo and is one of the most popular tourist attractions in Singapore.

The concept of a nocturnal park in Singapore was mooted in the 1980s by the former executive chairman of the Singapore Zoo, Dr Ong Swee Law. Constructed at a cost of S$63 million, the Night Safari was officially opened on 26 May 1994 and occupies 40 hectares (0.4 km²) of secondary rainforest adjacent to the Singapore Zoo and Upper Seletar Reservoir.

The Night Safari currently houses a total of 1,040 animals of 120 species, of which 29% are threatened species. The zoo is managed by Wildlife Reserves Singapore, and about 1.1 million visitors visit the safari per year.[1] The Night Safari received its 11 millionth visitor on 29 May 2007.

==================================
Highlights

Unlike traditional nocturnal houses, which reverse the day-night cycle of animals so they will be active by day, the Night Safari is an entire open-air zoo set in a humid tropical forest that is only open at night. It is divided into eight geographical zones, which can be explored either on foot via three walking trails, or by tram.

The animals of the Night Safari, ranging from Indian rhinoceros to tarsiers, are made visible by lighting that resembles moonlight. Although it is brighter than full moonlight by a few orders of magnitude, it is dim enough not to disturb nocturnal and crepuscular animals' behaviour. London based lighting designer Simon Corder created the lighting for Night Safari.

Exhibits in the safari come from South America and other parts of Asia. The naturalistic enclosures simulate the animals' native habitat. Animals are separated from visitors with natural barriers, rather than caged, similar to the Singapore Zoo's open concept. Instead of vertical prison-like cages, cattle grids were laid all over the park to prevent hoofed animals from moving one habitat to another. These are grille-like metal sheets with gaps wide enough for animals' legs to go through. Moats were designed to look like streams and rivers to enable fishing cats and servals to be put on show in open areas, and hot wires were designed to look like twigs to keep animals away from the boundaries of their enclosures.

Cultural performances are a regular feature at the safari, and include tribal dances, blowpipe demonstrations and fire eating displays. Creatures of the Night Show is a performance presented by the animals in the Night Safari.

There are a number of food and beverage outlets in the Night Safari which include Ulu Ulu Safari Restaurant, Bongo Burgers, and Ben & Jerry's Scoop Shop. Visitors can also experience dining on the move with the Cocktail Safari Express and Gourmet Safari Express.
816->8055 - 27/10/2009 05:18 PM
#15
Clarke Quay
[color="red"]Clarke Quay

Spoiler for pic

•~• ۩ ۞ Tempat² Wisata di [Singapore] ۞ ۩ •~•
•~• ۩ ۞ Tempat² Wisata di [Singapore] ۞ ۩ •~•
•~• ۩ ۞ Tempat² Wisata di [Singapore] ۞ ۩ •~•
•~• ۩ ۞ Tempat² Wisata di [Singapore] ۞ ۩ •~•

Clarke Quay is a historical riverside quay in Singapore, located within the Singapore River Planning Area. The quay is situated upstream from the mouth of the Singapore River and Boat Quay.

===========================
Etymology

Clarke Quay was named after Sir Andrew Clarke, Singapore's second Governor and Governor of the Straits Settlements from 1873 to 1875, who played a key role in positioning Singapore as the main port for the Malay states of Perak, Selangor and Sungei Ujong.

Clarke Quay is also the name of a road along the quay, part of which has since been converted into a pedestrian mall. Clarke Street, located next to Clarke Quay, was officially named in 1896, and was originally two streets known simply as East Street and West Street in north Kampong Malacca. Similar to Clarke Quay, Clarke Street has since been converted into a pedestrian mall.

The Hoklos (Hokkien) refer to Clarke Street as gi hok kong si au, meaning "behind the new Gi Hok Kongsi" (house). The new Gi Hok Kongsi was near Carpenter Street. Another Chinese reference, which only refers to the Southern bank around Read Bridge area, was cha chun tau (柴船头), meaning "jetty for boats carrying firewood". Small tongkangs carrying firewood from Indonesia berthed at this jetty. The firewood trade was primarily a Teochew enterprise.

===================================
History

Barge lighters used to transport cargo between Boat Quay and the warehouses at Clarke Quay. Today, bumboats ply along the same route, but for river cruises and as river taxies.

The Singapore River has been the centre of trade since modern Singapore was founded in 1819. During the colonial era, Boat Quay was the commercial centre where barge lighters would transport goods upstream to warehouses at Clarke Quay.

At the height of its prosperity, dozens of bumboats jostled for mooring space beside Clarke Quay. This continued well into the latter half of the twentieth century. By this time, the Singapore River had also become very polluted. The government decided to relocate cargo services to a new modern facility in Pasir Panjang. The bumboats and lorries departed to their new home and Clarke Quay fell silent.

The government then cleaned up the Singapore River and its environment from 1977 to 1987. Plans were made to revamp the area and turn it into a flourishing commercial, residential and entertainment precinct. These plans took into serious consideration the historical value of Clarke Quay, making it mandatory that new buildings complement the historical character of the area and that certain old buildings be restored.
leftG-MAX reverse bungee

Clarke Quay Festival Village, the biggest conservation project for the Singapore River, was developed and officially opened on 10 December 1993. In later years, Clarke Quay was managed and owned by CapitaLand.

Ten years later, works were commenced to revamp the Clarke Quay area in order to give the place a better tenant mix. The development also saw major changes to the exterior and riverside areas. The Satay Club and a number of establishments vacated Clarke Quay to make way for new tenants. The upgraded Clarke Quay features the Ministry of Sound, The Clinic, Forbidden City by the Indochine Group and the whole development was completed in October 2006.[/COLOR]
816->8055 - 27/10/2009 05:35 PM
#16
Science Centre Singapore
[color="red"]Science Centre Singapore
Spoiler for pic

•~• ۩ ۞ Tempat² Wisata di [Singapore] ۞ ۩ •~•
•~• ۩ ۞ Tempat² Wisata di [Singapore] ۞ ۩ •~•
•~• ۩ ۞ Tempat² Wisata di [Singapore] ۞ ۩ •~•


The Science Centre Singapore (Abbreviation: SCS, Chinese: 新加坡科学馆), previously known as Singapore Science Centre[1] is a scientific institution in Jurong East, Singapore, specialising in the promotion of scientific and technological education for the general public. With over 850 exhibits spread over eight exhibition galleries, it sees over a million visitors a year today, and over 17 million visitors up to the year 2003 when it celebrated its silver jubilee.

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History

The Science Centre was born out of a governmental initiative in hiving off the scientific-related exhibits from the then National Museum of Singapore into a separate institution so that the latter could specialise in its artistic and historical collections. This idea was first mooted in 1969 by the Science Council of Singapore, and was subsequently approved by the government, who was keen to promote scientific education in the rapidly modernising country keen to tap into the technological sector.

The SCS building's architecture was decided by an architectural design competition organised by the Science Centre Board. Raymond Woo's entry was selected, and was thus commissioned as the architect for the project. Built at a cost of S$12 million on a 60,000 m² site in Jurong East, it was officially opened on 10 December 1977 by Dr Toh Chin Chye, who was the Minister-in-charge of the Science Centre Board.

On 7 December 2007, the Science Centre rebranded itself to be known as "Science Centre Singapore" ("SCS").

==================================
Developments

In 1987, the centre saw a significant expansion with the opening of Singapore's first and only OMNIMAX (now known as IMAX Dome) theater, the Singapore Omni-Theatre. Costing S$18 million, it has a 276 seat theater underneath a 23-meter tilted dome.

In 1999, a S$38 million renovation expanded on the exhibition space, created a new entrance, as well as open-air exhibition areas and a direct connection to the separate Omni-Theatre building. In 2000, Snow City, a recreation of a -5 degrees Celsius environment in tropical Singapore was set up beside the Omni-Theatre.

==================================
The Observatory
The Observatory at the Science Centre is one of the few observatories in the world located next to the Equator.

Location

The Science Centre Observatory is situated at 1°20′03″N 103°44′14″E / 1.33417°N 103.73722°E / 1.33417; 103.73722, and is 15.27 m above mean sea level. It is one of the few observatories in the world located next to the Equator. Its unique position allows constellations in both the northern and southern celestial hemispheres to be observed and thus opens up more vistas in the sky for observers. The Observatory is endowed with a range of sophisticated facilities as well as a classroom for astronomy lessons, slide shows and public talks.

Telescope

The main telescope of the Observatory is a 40-cm Cassegrain reflector of combined focal length 520-cm. The sub-telescope is a 15-cm apochromatic Kepler refractor of focal length 180-cm. The equatorial mount for the telescopes was designed for Singapore's unique location in ; the accompanying English yoke provides the necessary stability for the drive and tracking mechanisms. The 5.5-metre stainless steel dome can be made to swivel in any direction and its shutter can be made to slide open for the telescope to be focused onto interesting objects in the sky.

Star-gazing session

The Observatory is open to the public for star-gazing sessions on every Friday nights with effect from June 2006. The opening hours are from 7.50pm to 10pm.The Observatory can comfortably accommodate 50 visitors per session. It is important to note that star-gazing through the observatory telescope is only possible when the sky is clear. However, regardless of weather conditions, the staff will be present.[/COLOR]
816->8055 - 27/10/2009 05:35 PM
#17
Pulau Ubin
[color="red"]Pulau Ubin
Spoiler for pic

•~• ۩ ۞ Tempat² Wisata di [Singapore] ۞ ۩ •~•
•~• ۩ ۞ Tempat² Wisata di [Singapore] ۞ ۩ •~•
•~• ۩ ۞ Tempat² Wisata di [Singapore] ۞ ۩ •~•
•~• ۩ ۞ Tempat² Wisata di [Singapore] ۞ ۩ •~•

Pulau Ubin is a small island (10.19 km²) situated in the north east of Singapore, to the west of Pulau Tekong. Granite quarrying supported a few thousand settlers on Pulau Ubin in the 1960s, but only about a hundred villagers live there today. It is one of the last rural areas to be found in Singapore.

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Etymology

The name Pulau Ubin literally means "Granite Island" in Malay, which explains the many abandoned granite quarries there. The word ubin is said to be a Javanese term for "squared stone". To the Malays, the island is also known as Pulau Batu Ubin, or "Granite Stone Island". The rocks on the island were used to make floor tiles in the past and were called Jubin, which was then shortened to Ubin.

The island is known as chioh sua in Hokkien, which means "stone hill".

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Legend

Legend has it that Pulau Ubin was formed when three animals from Singapore (a frog, a pig and an elephant) challenged each other to a race to reach the shores of Johor. The animals that failed would turn to stone. All three came across many difficulties and were unable to reach the shores of Johor. Therefore, the elephant and pig together turned into Pulau Ubin whilst the frog became Pulau Sekudu or Frog Island.[1]

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History

Pulau Ubin first appeared on map in an 1828 sketch of the Island of Singapore as Pulo Obin and in Franklin and Jackson's map as Po. Ubin.

Since the British founding of Singapore, the island has been known for its granite. The numerous granite quarries on the island supply the local construction industry. The granite outcrops are particularly spectacular from the sea because their grooves and fluted sides create furrows and ridges on each granite rock slab. These features are captured in John Turnbull Thomson's 1850 painting — Grooved stones on Pulo Ubin near Singapore.

The granite from Pulau Ubin was used in the construction of Horsburgh Lighthouse. Tongkangs ferried the huge rock blocks (30 by 20 feet) from the island to Pedra Branca, the site of the lighthouse, in 1850 and 1851.

Later, the granite was also used to build the Singapore-Johor Causeway. None of the quarries are in operation today and are being slowly recolonised by vegetation or filled with water. Apart from quarrying, farming and fishing were the principal occupations of the inhabitants of the island in the past. It is also called Selat Tebrau (tebrau is a kind of large fish).

In the 1880s, a number of Malays led by Endut Senin, from the Kallang River were said to have moved to the island that began the thriving Malay community on the island.

Many of the former kampongs on Pulau Ubin were either named after the first person who settled in the kampong or by some feature in the area. Kampong Leman was named by Leman; Kampong Cik Jawa by a Singaporean named Jawa; and Kampong Jelutong from people from Changi and from its jelutong trees.

On June 3, 2005, the Singapore Government ordered that all the farmers rearing poultry on the island were to ship them to mainland Singapore and rear them in government-approved farms by June 17, 2005, in the wake of the avian influenza. In exchange, the local inhabitants were offered HDB government housing packages, although they could choose to live on the island.

==============================
Current situation

Pulau Ubin is one of the few areas in Singapore that is largely free from urban development.

Pulau Ubin is one of the last areas in Singapore that has been preserved from urban development, concrete buildings and tarmac roads.

Pulau Ubin's wooden house villages and wooden jetties, relaxed inhabitants, rich and preserved wildlife, abandoned quarries and plantations, and untouched nature in general make it the last witness of the old "kampong" Singapore that existed before modern industrial times and large scale urban development.

The Singapore Government's development projects on the island in the last few years has been controversial and debate has been able to find its way through government-controlled media. So far ideas to build public housing on the island connected to Singapore island via undersea tunnels carrying MRT lines have remained on the urban planners' drawing boards.

Though recent government action has been limited to widening the paths for bicycles, building shelters for trekkers and other facilities for the growing number of visitors, it is already discreetly changing the face and nature of Pulau Ubin from untouched to planned, and paving the way for further developments.

In 2007, the Singapore Government decided to reuse the Granite Quarry in Pulau Ubin due to indications that Indonesia might restrict exports of granite to Singapore.

The future of the island is in the hands of Singapore Government which may postpone its development preferring to concentrate on re-developing existing space on Singapore island and nearby Pulau Tekong. For now Pulau Ubin is a haven as a former rural way of life will most likely disappear with its last "kampong" generation passing.

There are a few tarmac roads on Pulau Ubin but most roads are still gravel roads. There are a number of minibuses, Mitsubishi Jeeps and motorbikes on the island. The number plates for all vehicles on the island start with PU - which stands for Pulau Ubin.

Also, many schools visit Pulau Ubin for overnight school trips. For example, Overseas Family School's grade 6 visited the island in 2008. Although the locals try to keep the island un-urbanized, they need some small boosts of money to support them.

==================================
Local tourism

Though the island attracted attention for development and planning only in recent years, Singaporean visitors have been visiting Pulau Ubin for summer camps and outdoor activities for many years.
Coastal boardwalk at Chek Jawa.

With growing attention and interest in nature, the flow of visitors to Pulau Ubin has increased over the years.

One of the current popular tourist attractions on the island is Chek Jawa. A previous coral reef 5,000 years ago, Chek Jawa can be said to be virtually unspoilt, with a variety of marine wildlife comparable to other islands, such as sea hares, sea squirts, octopuses, starfishes, sand dollars, fishes, sponges, cuttlefishes and nudibranches.
Bumboats waiting at Pulau Ubin jetty for passengers.

Visitors may travel to Pulau Ubin from the main island of Singapore via a 10-minute bumboat ride from the Changi Village jetty. In 2008 the one way ticket price was increased from S$2.00 to S$2.50 per passenger. Every bumboat can carry 12 passengers and the captain will wait till his boat has reached the maximum capacity. People who do not want to wait can pay S$30.00 for the whole bumboat and leave without waiting.

The rental price for bicycles range anywhere from S$2.00 to S$20.00 (for the entire day) depending on the condition of the bike, number of gears etc.

==============================
Mountain Biking

Pulau Ubin is home to one of Singapore's best mountain bike trails, Ketam Mountain Bike Park which was built in 2007.[2] The trail is approximately 8 kilometers long and features a wide range of terrain ranging from open meadows to thick jungle. There are numerous steep but short climbs and descents. The trail is well-marked with signs indicating the difficulty level of each section.

The vast majority of the mountain bikers that ride this trail bring their own bike, although the rental bikes on the island can also be used.

===============================
Culture

MediaCorp filmed a Channel 8 television drama called My Teacher, My Friend in 1999 about the lives of students in the primary school that used to exist on Pulau Ubin.

Mediacorp filmed a Kids Central television drama called Ubin Boy in 2007 about two boys living in Pulau Ubin.[/COLOR]
816->8055 - 27/10/2009 05:36 PM
#18
Geylang
[color="red"]Geylang

Spoiler for pic

•~• ۩ ۞ Tempat² Wisata di [Singapore] ۞ ۩ •~•
•~• ۩ ۞ Tempat² Wisata di [Singapore] ۞ ۩ •~•

Geylang, also known as Geylang Serai, is a neighbourhood in the city-state of Singapore east of the Central Area, Singapore's central business district. It is located to the East of the Singapore River.

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Etymology

The word Geylang is found early in Singapore's history.

The other possible origin to the word "Geylang" is Chinese Hokkien "鸡笼“, which means chicken cage.[citation needed]

================================
Contemporary Geylang

Partly untouched by urban projects and developments and so far spared by the gentrification process that has changed the face of Singapore since the 1970s, Geylang's combination of shophouse scenery and hectic day and night life, including a red-light district (particularly the even numbered streets or Lorongs), foreign workers quarters and karaoke lounges provides an alternative view of elements the rest of modern Singapore generally does not have. Shophouses along Geylang Road are protected from redevelopment, and several famous eateries have sprung up along the major road.

Geylang is also a red-light district of Singapore. Thousands of Asian prostitutes mostly from other countries work in Geylang, and visitors and locals alike flock to the area each evening and stay till morning. The district is home to hundreds of brothels. Some are regulated, while others operate behind the scenes illegally. The houses in Geylang operating in sex practices are easily identifiable; their house numbers are large and bright red. As many as a dozen girls work out of each house, and the operating hours tend to be 14:00-3:00.

The area provides legal sex services for all of Singapore. Typical prices in this area range from S$50 to S$150, and services are vastly different for locals as they are for visitors. Typically, the locals know where to go for the best deals while tourist often fall into traps or are even strong-armed by brothel management. These practices are noted by Singapore authorities, but in most cases they look the other way when it comes to crime in Geylang.[1]

================================
Transport

To get to Geylang Road, there are lot of several MRT stations in the vicinity of Geylang Road: Aljunied, Kallang and Paya Lebar stations. There is also the Geylang Lorong 1 Bus Terminal situated in the Kallang planning area.[/COLOR]
chijmes18 - 27/10/2009 05:48 PM
#19

[COLOR="Red"]Chinese & Japanese Garden

Spoiler for pic

•~• ۩ ۞ Tempat² Wisata di [Singapore] ۞ ۩ •~•
•~• ۩ ۞ Tempat² Wisata di [Singapore] ۞ ۩ •~•


Chinese Garden (Chinese: 裕华园), also commonly known as Jurong Gardens, is a park in Jurong East, Singapore. The garden was built in 1975 and designed by Prof. Yuen-chen Yu, a well-known architect from Taiwan, the Chinese Garden’s concept is based on Chinese gardening art. The main characteristic is the integration of splendid architectural features with the natural environment. The Chinese Garden is modelled along the northern Chinese imperial style of architecture and landscaping. It is located next to Chinese Garden MRT Station and connected to the adjacent Japanese Garden by a bridge.

===========================
Opening Hours

Main Garden 6.00 am - 11.00 pm (daily)

Open:

Bonsai Garden & Garden of Abundance: 9am - 6pm (daily)

Getting There: The gardens are a 5-minute walk from the Chinese Garden MRT Station
[edit] Admission

Admission to Main Garden - Free

Admission charges to Garden of Abundance SGD 2 adults, SGD 1 children (3 - 12 years), SGD 1 senior citizens (55 years and above)

Admission charges to Live Turtle & Tortoise Museum SGD 5 adults, SGD 3 children (3 - 12 years)

Admission to Bonsai Garden is free.

=================================
Features


Stone Lion

It is a Chinese belief that the lion is the animal representing authority and fealty. Thus, the cloudy-grained marble stone lions at the gates of the Chinese Garden – typically Chinese in style – guarding the main gates of the Garden. They are skillfully sculptured from Taiwan-imported marble stone.

Bridge

In the art of Chinese gardens, bridges play an important role; they are one of the most important structures and may denote the characteristics of various periods of civilizations.

The ‘Pai Hung Ch’iao’ Bridge (the white rainbow, 13-Arch Bridge) at the Garden follows the style of the 17-Arch Bridge at the Summer Palace in Peking. Although the bridge at the Chinese Garden is shorter than the famous 17-Arch Bridge, it still maintains the magnificence and brilliance in architectural design, representing a typical beautiful Chinese bridge.
[edit] Main Arch Building

It is a renowned and typical Chinese arch building. The magnificent and grandiose form has made it very popular for picture-taking.

Inside the main arch building, there is two courtyards, namely the “Early Spring Courtyard” and “Garden Courtyard”. Also, there is a fishpond in the centre which is named the “Fishes Paradise”.

Stone Boat and Tea House

A famous traditional feature of Chinese architecture is the Stone Boat structure. Its unique design and splendid architectural beauty is a fine art which has long been praised by people throughout the world.

The style of ‘Yao-Yueh Fang’ (the Stone Boat) in the Chinese Garden is based on the Peking style, but there are some adaptations in the design and the materials used here – as a result of which – a more beautiful and grandiose form is obtained.

The ‘Ming Hsiang Hsieh’ (Tea House) is a miniature structure following the style of the elaborate, winding gallery at the Summer Palace. This meandering design is a characteristic and graceful Chinese architectural feature.

Pagoda

The bridge connecting the Chinese Garden and Japanese Garden islands; the pagoda is seen rising behind it

In ancient times, the pagoda, originally a simple tower located beside a temple, was used for the keeping of human bones by Buddhists. Later, with improvements in architectural skills, incorporated with the traditional art of building, the pagoda was developed into a structure of striking architectural beauty.

The ‘Ru Yun T’a) (7-storey pagoda) is situated on a small hill in the Chinese Garden. Its typical pagoda design follows the style of Ling Ku Temple Pagoda at Nanjing.

Pavilion, Plateau, Tower

The Chinese Pavilion, Plateau and Tower represent the soul of the Chinese gardening art. The artistic features, typical of Chinese architecture have long been appreciated by man. The arrangement of these structures is very important and one of the essential rules of the structural arrangement is that the position of each structure must be balanced by its height and size. Further, the building must be linked with plants, rocks, a winding stream and footpaths so as to create a poetical scene.

The design of the four pavilions at the Chinese Garden is based on the style of Northern Chinese Pavilions, and decorated to blend harmoniously with the Garden.

Bonsai Garden

Opened in June 1992, the Suzhou-style Bonsai Garden cost an estimate $3.8 million to build. This 5,800 sq metres garden with Suzhou-style buildings (incorporating a main hall of 50 sq metres) and landscape houses a collection of over 2,,000 bonsais imported from China and other parts of the world.

The Bonsai Garden has since taken on a new look. Newly revitalised, after spending an estimate of another $500,000 - the Bonsai Garden is a beauty that must be seen to be believed. It is designed as a largest Suzhou-style Bonsai garden of its kind outside of China.

A Bonsai Training Centre has been launched. The public are encouraged to sign up for the course, which will be taught by our resident Bonsai experts from Shanghai and Suzhou (China). They will teach on how to prune and care for Bonsais and how to appreciate the beauty of this unique artistry.

Garden of Abundance

The newest addition to the Chinese Garden family is the Garden of Abundance. The original name of this garden is the Zodiac & Pomegranate Garden, derived from the elements used for the construction of the garden.

It consists of pomegranate trees, the 12 Chinese Zodiac animals sculpture, a sundial, stone bridges and planting of materials, which have meanings of longevity, abundance and fulfilment. Hence the name Garden of Abundance was selected.

100-year-old pomegranate trees from Shantung, China have been carefully planted into this new garden. It sits among the 12 Chinese Zodiac Animal sculptures. This creative concept of Chinese Garden is a new scenic spot designed according to Chinese tradition and folk culture. And most importantly, the theme and design of this garden bestows sincere wishes dedicated to the visitor.

The Live Turtle & Tortoise Museum

The Live Turtle and Tortoise Museum exhibits different species turtles and tortoises. An highlight of the museum is it exhibits exotic types of tortoises, such as tortoises with 2 heads and 6 legs - where only one in every few million of these rare species will survive.

You Yuan Buffet & Seafood Restaurant

Serving all kinds of seafood, southern and northern China cooking, Peking, Szechuan and Cantonese cuisine, You Yuan Seafood Restaurant sits on the Stone Boat, overlooking the calming waters. With the new boardwalk so that diners can go alfresco under the stars. There is also a dancing arena and karaoke, set in classy, unique traditional Chinese theme. It is open for both lunch and dinner.

The East Entrance

This entrance was specially constructed in conjunction with the Chinese Garden MRT station, to ensure easy access for pedestrians visiting the gardens. Upon approaching the garden, there is a Red Bridge that will lead you in. This Red Bridge symbolises good luck and is an auspicious colour for the Chinese. Two stone lions, welcoming the visitors before entering the garden, also guard the entrance.[/COLOR]
$ephiroth - 27/10/2009 07:58 PM
#20

gambar2 geylang laennya

Spoiler for geylang

btw ada yg punya account photobucket gak? biar ini gambar bisa awet... beer:
•~• ۩ ۞ Tempat² Wisata di [Singapore] ۞ ۩ •~•
judi di geylang (tinggal pasang meja + gambar dadu)
jadi agan2 taro duid 10$ di nomer2 dadu, bandar kocok dadu (2 biji), duid anda dikali jumlah dadu yg tepat ama angka yg dipilih

•~• ۩ ۞ Tempat² Wisata di [Singapore] ۞ ۩ •~•
no comment

•~• ۩ ۞ Tempat² Wisata di [Singapore] ۞ ۩ •~•
no comment

•~• ۩ ۞ Tempat² Wisata di [Singapore] ۞ ۩ •~•
ini harga durian ntah taon kapan, skrg sih berkisar antara 5$, 8$, 15$
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