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sovietski - 08/11/2010 12:19 PM
#41

what is your major in university? may you tell me books you reads for those subjects?
as im interested in semiology socio-linguistic and taking cultural studies, also semioogy, for my graduate thesisDDDDDDDDD
thathithud - 16/12/2010 07:11 PM
#42

Quote:
Original Posted By banny123
Feminism

To speak of "Feminism" as a theory is already a reduction. However, in terms of its theory (rather than as its reality as a historical movement in effect for some centuries) feminism might be categorized into three general groups:

1. theories having an essentialist focus (including psychoanalytic and French feminism);
2. theories aimed at defining or establishing a feminist literary canon or theories seeking to re-interpret and re-vision literature (and culture and history and so forth) from a less patriarchal slant (including gynocriticism, liberal feminism); and
3. theories focusing on sexual difference and sexual politics (including gender studies, lesbian studies, cultural feminism, radical feminism, and socialist/materialist feminism).

Further, women (and men) needed to consider what it meant to be a woman, to consider how much of what society has often deemed inherently female traits, are culturally and socially constructed. Simone de Beauvoir's study, The Second Sex, though perhaps flawed by Beauvoir's own body politics, nevertheless served as a groundbreaking book of feminism, that questioned the "othering" of women by western philosophy. Early projects in feminist theory included resurrecting women's literature that in many cases had never been considered seriously or had been erased over time (e.g., Charlotte Perkins Gilman was quite prominent in the early 20th century but was virtually unknown until her work was "re-discovered" later in the century). Since the 1960s the writings of many women have been rediscovered, reconsidered, and collected in large anthologies such as The Norton Anthology of Literature by Women.

However, merely unearthing women's literature did not ensure its prominence; in order to assess women's writings the number of preconceptions inherent in a literary canon dominated by male beliefs and male writers needed to be re-evaluated. Betty Friedan's The Feminist Mystique (1963), Kate Millet's Sexual Politics (1970), Teresa de Lauretis's Alice Doesn't: Feminism, Semiotics, Cinema (1984), Annette Kolodny's The Lay of the Land (1975), Judith Fetterly's The Resisting Reader (1978), Elaine Showalter's A Literature of Their Own (1977), or Sandra Gilbert and Susan Gubar's The Madwoman in the Attic (1979) are just a handful of the many critiques that questioned cultural, sexual, intellectual, and/or psychological stereotypes about women.

Key Terms (this list is woefully inadequate; suggestions for additional terms would be appreciated):

Androgyny - taken from Women Studies page of Drew University - "'...suggests a world in which sex-roles are not rigidly defined, a state in which ‘the man in every woman' and the ‘woman in every man' could be integrated and freely expressed' (Tuttle 19). Used more frequently in the 1970's, this term was used to describe a blurring, or combination of gender roles so that neither masculinity or femininity is dominant."

Backlash - a term, which may have originated with Susan Faludi, referring to a movement ( ca. 1980s) away from or against feminism.

Écriture féminine - Écriture féminine, literally women's writing, is a philosophy that promotes women's experiences and feelings to the point that it strengthens the work. Hélène Cixous first uses this term in her essay, "The Laugh of the Medusa," in which she asserts, "Woman must write her self: must write about women and bring women to writing, from which they have been driven away as violently as from their bodies. Écriture féminine places experience before language, and privileges the anti-linear, cyclical writing so often frowned upon by patriarchal society' (Wikipedia).

Essentialism - taken from Women Studies page of Drew University - "The belief in a uniquely feminine essence, existing above and beyond cultural conditioning...the mirror image of biologism which for centuries justified the oppression of women by proclaiming the natural superiority of men (Tuttle 90)." Tong's use of the term is relative to the explanation of the division of radical feminism into radical-cultural and radical libertarian.

Gynocentrics - "a term coined by the feminist scholar-critic Elaine Showalter to define the process of constructing "a female framework for analysis of women's literature [in order] to develop new models [of interpretation] based on the study of female experience, rather than to adapt to male models and theories'" (Bressler 269, see General Resources below).

Jouissance - a term most commonly associated with Helene Cixous (seek-sou), whose use of the word may have derived from Jacques Lacan - "Cixous follows Lacan's psychoanalytic paradigm, which argues that a child must separate from its mother's body (the Real) in order to enter into the Symbolic. Because of this, Cixous says, the female body in general becomes unrepresentable in language; it's what can't be spoken or written in the phallogocentric Symbolic order. Cixous here makes a leap from the maternal body to the female body in general; she also leaps from that female body to female sexuality, saying that female sexuality, female sexual pleasure, feminine jouissance, is unrepresentable within the phallogocentric Symbolic order" (Dr. Mary Klages, "Postructuralist Feminist Theory")

Patriarchy - "Sexism is perpetuated by systems of patriarchy where male-dominated structures and social arrangements elaborate the oppression of women. Patriarchy almost by definition also exhibits androcentrism, meaning male centered. Coupled with patriarchy, androcentrism assumes that male norms operate through out all social institutions and become the standard to which all persons adhere" (Joe Santillan - University of California at Davis).

Phallologocentrism - "language ordered around an absolute Word (logos) which is “masculine” [phallic], systematically excludes, disqualifies, denigrates, diminishes, silences the “feminine” (Nikita Dhawan).

Second- and Third-Wave feminism - "Second-wave feminism refers to a period of feminist thought that originated around the 1960s and was mainly concerned with independence and greater political action to improve women's rights" (Wikipedia). "Third-wave feminism is a feminist movement that arguably began in the early 1990s. Unlike second-wave feminism, which largely focused on the inclusion of women in traditionally male-dominated areas, third-wave feminism seeks to challenge and expand common definitions of gender and sexuality" (Wikipedia).

Semiotic - "[Julia] Kristeva (kris-TAYV-veh) makes a distinction between the semiotic and symbolic modes of communication:

Further Reading

# Cixous (seek-sou), Hélène. "The Laugh of the Medusa" or "Sorties: Out & Out: Attacks/Ways Out/Forays."
# Flax, Jane. Thinking Fragments: Psychoanalysis, Feminism and Postmodernism in the Contemporary West, 1990.
# Gallop, Jane. The Daughter's Seduction: Feminism and Psychoanalysis, 1982.
# Grosz, E. A. (Elizabeth A.) Sexual Subversions: Three French Feminists. Boston : Allen & Unwin, 1989.
# Irigaray, Luce. Speculum of the Other Woman. Ithaca, N.Y : Cornell University Press, 1985. HQ1154 .I7413 1985
# Kristeva (kris-TAYV-veh), Julia. The Kristeva Reader. Ed. Toril Moi, 1986.
# Marks, Elaine, and Isabelle de Courtivron, eds. New French Feminism. Brighton: Harvester, 1980.
# Moi, Toril. Sexual/textual Politics: Feminist Literary Theory. London ; New York : Methuen, 1985.PN98.W64 M65 1985


I used this theory on my final project o
I analyzed "the color purple" 's novel, a very great novel to be analyzed D
myspot - 16/12/2010 09:15 PM
#43

wow, nice thread
5 stars for you

anyway, i got an assignment to analyze "The Most Dangerous Games"
so this thread will help me alot
thanks\)
terr4 - 28/12/2010 01:08 PM
#44

WOW!! this thread is great!. I have to bookmark this site in my browser.. D

Hey..
I'm in my way to analyze The Kite Runner novel by using collective unconsciousness, Jung's theory. But I don't have any sources to understand and learning about the theory.

Could someone give me any link(s) to site where I can understand more about collective unconsciousness?
I found one and read it in Wikipedia yesterday but it's too general. I need a specific one..

Thank you

ilovekaskus iloveindonesia
F. Luccava - 02/01/2011 02:40 PM
#45

wow,, the explanation is very clear to me. I take English major too and I need a lot of resources like this.
Up to now, I have my heart on Formalism \)Literary Criticism Theory : An introduction (for you who read lots)
keyzzzzz - 03/01/2011 11:26 AM
#46

wow...
it's a nice thread!!
I learn these theories in my college, since I take English Literature major. This thread really helps me in understanding the theories. thanks for the thread starter!!:2thumbup
KLanese - 03/01/2011 03:15 PM
#47

Sorry, but I don't know much about literature. What has been questioning me is that a literature student who is about to have his/her thesis examined, would the examiners really read the novels that was researched by the student? so that the revisions did not tend to be too subjective?
F. Luccava - 09/01/2011 03:15 AM
#48

Quote:
Original Posted By KLanese
Sorry, but I don't know much about literature. What has been questioning me is that a literature student who is about to have his/her thesis examined, would the examiners really read the novels that was researched by the student? so that the revisions did not tend to be too subjective?


Of course the examiners read the novels!
Interpreting is based on evidence,too so I think it is not that subjective \)Literary Criticism Theory : An introduction (for you who read lots)
Sepintu - 16/01/2011 05:45 PM
#49

Salam. Pleased to know you Banny \)

I'm a student of English Lit
I need ur help dude
I got a take home assignment for my pre-20th Century Poetry Explication course. (paper)
My instructor order me to choose one of five poems and give the analysis.

...The poems are as follow :
1.) Virtue - George Herbert
2.) A Poison Tree - William Blake
3.) O might those sighs and tears - John Donne
4.) Love that doth reign and live within my thought - Henry Howard
5.) The Passionate Shepherd to His Love - Christoper Marlowe

by the way, im not good at interpreting poem because im not intrested in poetry
so, i need ur suggestion which poem i should take to analyze (poem that best for me)
then i'll use DiYanni's Three Dimensions theory or Abram's four general approaches (yet two theories is still not clear to me T_T). Any idea?

waiting for good responds \)


_______________________________________________________________

I beg you to teach me step by step in explicating that poem starting from introduction, analysis, and conclusion. yeah this's embarassing, I admit it.. \(

As I said before, im not intersted in this course.
I used to translate it (a poem) line by line. Just translated it (not more). Well you know that's not good to intepret a poem in such a way. hammer:

Finally, i choosed "virtue". What do you think 'bout that? is that a good choice? or any ideas?
the next question is which is the best theory to use? (certainly considering my skill too \(

So (again) I need ur help guys
The other kaskusers are welcomed to contribute a help, too \)


Your help would be much appreciated \)


*sorry for my bad english


p.s : It's due on Tuesday 18th (on midday) \(
banny123 - 16/01/2011 06:20 PM
#50

Quote:
Original Posted By Sepintu
Salam. Pleased to know you Banny \)

I'm a student of English Lit
I need ur help dude
I got a take home assignment for my pre-20th Century Poetry Explication course. (paper)
My instructor order me to choose one of five poems and give the analysis.

...The poems are as follow :
1.) Virtue - George Herbert
2.) A Poison Tree - William Blake
3.) O might those sighs and tears - John Donne
4.) Love that doth reign and live within my thought - Henry Howard
5.) The Passionate Shepherd to His Love - Christoper Marlowe

by the way, im not good at interpreting poem because im not intrested in poetry
so, i need ur suggestion which poem i should take to analyze (poem that best for me)
then i'll use DiYanni's Three Dimensions theory or Abram's four general approaches (yet two theories is still not clear to me T_T). Any idea?

waiting for good responds \)


_______________________________________________________________

I beg you to teach me step by step in explicating that poem starting from introduction, analysis, and conclusion. yeah this's embarassing, I admit it.. \(

As I said before, im not intersted in this course.
I used to translate it (a poem) line by line. Just translated it (not more). Well you know that's not good to intepret a poem in such a way. hammer:

Finally, i choosed "virtue". What do you think 'bout that? is that a good choice? or any ideas?
the next question is which is the best theory to use? (certainly considering my skill too \(

So (again) I need ur help guys
The other kaskusers are welcomed to contribute a help, too \)


Your help would be much appreciated \)


*sorry for my bad english


p.s : It's due on Tuesday 18th (on midday) \(


helo there, pleased to know you too \)
first of all, lemme get you know I'm only do something I can do, and it doesn't make you're not doing something on this, I'm opening a discussion, a consult, so the rest of your scores will be based on your hard work on it. is that okay? D

ok, I don't know exactly what kind of poem that fits you or you are prone into, since I don't know in what kind of level you are, so I will help you on the poem you have chosen. "Virtue". I'll get it copied here D

Quote:
Vertue.

Sweet day, so cool, so calm, so bright,
The bridall of the earth and skie:
The dew shall weep thy fall to night;
For thou must die.

Sweet rose, whose hue angrie and brave
Bids the rash gazer wipe his eye:
Thy root is ever in its grave
And thou must die.

Sweet spring, full of sweet dayes and roses,
A box where sweets compacted lie;
My musick shows ye have your closes,1
And all must die.

Onely a sweet and vertuous soul,
Like season’d timber, never gives;
But though the whole world turn to coal,
Then chiefly lives.


is it? okay, let's start doing something here D

"Virtue" is one of the poems in a collection of verse called The Temple (1633), which George Herbert wrote during the last three years of his life. By then, he had taken holy orders in the Anglican Church and become rector in Bemerton, England. Herbert's poems are lyrical and harmonious, reflecting the gentle voice of a country parson spreading the Christian message. He appreciates the beauty of creation not only for its own sake but also because he sees it as a mirror of the goodness of the Creator. Yet, despite Herbert's sense of the world's loveliness, his poems often reflect the transience of that beauty and the folly of investing it with any real value. In "Virtue," he presents a vision of an eternal world beyond the one available to sense perception. in Islam, we can call him as a "transcendentalist" or similar to Sufism.

Implicitly narrated, it is also a delicately expressed struggle between rebellion and obedience. The understated conflict lies between the desire to experience worldly pleasures and the desire—or as Herbert would insist, the need—to surrender to the will of God. The battle waged between rebellion and obedience can be seen more clearly in one of the best-known poems in The Temple, "The Collar." Therein, the poet "raves" against the yoke of submission that he must bear until he hears the voice of God call him "child"; then, he submissively yields, as the poem ends with the invocation "My Lord!" This conclusion indicates that what the narrator feels about the experience of the natural world is of less authenticity than an inner voice of authority that directs him toward God.

Herbert's poetry displays a conjunction of intellect and emotion. Carefully crafted structures, like the first three quatrains, or four-line stanzas, of "Virtue," all of which are similarly formed, contain sensuously perceived content, like depictions of daytime, nightfall, a rose, and spring. Such a combination of intellect and emotion, in which the two forces, expressed in bold metaphors and colloquial language, struggle with and illuminate each other, is most apparent in the poetry of one of Herbert's contemporaries, John Donne, and is called metaphysical poetry. In "Virtue," an example of this combination of the intellectual and the sensuous can be seen in the second line of the third quatrain, when the spring is compared to a box of compressed sweets.

above, narration which comprises four quatrains altogether, Herbert reflects on the loveliness of the living world but also on the reality of death. Building momentum by moving from the glory of a day to the beauty of a rose to the richness of springtime, while reiterating at the end of each quatrain that everything "must die," Herbert leads the reader to the last, slightly varied quatrain. There, the cherished thing is not a tangible manifestation of nature but the intangible substance of "a sweet and virtuous soul." When all else succumbs to death, the soul "then chiefly lives." Not through argument but through an accumulation of imagery, Herbert contrasts the passing glories of the mortal world with the eternal glory of the immortal soul and thereby distinguishes between momentary and eternal value.

but at the close look at it, let see on "everything in this world ends/dies" Examples:
1. Day (stanza 1): its attraction (cool, calm, bright, marriage of earth and sky); image that illustrates death (dew shall weep)
2. Rose (stanza 2): its attraction (bearing the physical marks of anger and brave, finely dressed, color effects the viewer); image that illustrates death (root is in its grave)
3. Spring (stanza 3): its attraction made of "sweet days" [from stanza 1] and roses [from stanza 2]; image that illustrates death (music has its endings)
2. Virtue, the virtuous soul, is the exception (stanza 4): image that illustrates [seasoned timber retains its virtue; even when the world turns to coal, it lives (in the flame of the Last Judgment, end of the world)]

"Sweet," the word that George Herbert repeats in each stanza of this poem, has often been used to describe the effect of Herbert’s poetry, both for the calm, benevolent character and for the delectable sound of the poems when read aloud. But as the dire, even grim meaning of "Virtue" suggests, Herbert is also a poet who thought deeply and perhaps perpetually of death and resignation. A miniature quality in the images (the rash gazer wiping his eye, the box of sweets, the dew, the coal) heightens, by contrast, the totality of "But though the whole world turn to coal".

satisfied? D
good luck with your exam beer:
banny123 - 16/01/2011 07:06 PM
#51

Quote:
Original Posted By sovietski
what is your major in university? may you tell me books you reads for those subjects?
as im interested in semiology socio-linguistic and taking cultural studies, also semioogy, for my graduate thesisDDDDDDDDD


I am majoring literature, lots of book I refer on those subjects. but for beginners, you can look for "the beginning theory" by Peter Barry. easy to read, but quite thorough in explaining things
Sepintu - 17/01/2011 01:54 PM
#52

not bad..

thanks though \)

well, it seems that i must do it myself.

btw, could you provide me simple-introduction about Abrams's four general approaches and DiYanni's three dimension theory?

i just missed the class by the time the instructor was explaining it hammer:
Sepintu - 17/01/2011 08:57 PM
#53

double post nohope:

sorry for the inconvenient
sixty_nine - 15/02/2011 04:34 PM
#54

Quote:
Original Posted By banny123
Feminism

To speak of "Feminism" as a theory is already a reduction. However, in terms of its theory (rather than as its reality as a historical movement in effect for some centuries) feminism might be categorized into three general groups:

1. theories having an essentialist focus (including psychoanalytic and French feminism);
2. theories aimed at defining or establishing a feminist literary canon or theories seeking to re-interpret and re-vision literature (and culture and history and so forth) from a less patriarchal slant (including gynocriticism, liberal feminism); and
3. theories focusing on sexual difference and sexual politics (including gender studies, lesbian studies, cultural feminism, radical feminism, and socialist/materialist feminism).

Further, women (and men) needed to consider what it meant to be a woman, to consider how much of what society has often deemed inherently female traits, are culturally and socially constructed. Simone de Beauvoir's study, The Second Sex, though perhaps flawed by Beauvoir's own body politics, nevertheless served as a groundbreaking book of feminism, that questioned the "othering" of women by western philosophy. Early projects in feminist theory included resurrecting women's literature that in many cases had never been considered seriously or had been erased over time (e.g., Charlotte Perkins Gilman was quite prominent in the early 20th century but was virtually unknown until her work was "re-discovered" later in the century). Since the 1960s the writings of many women have been rediscovered, reconsidered, and collected in large anthologies such as The Norton Anthology of Literature by Women.

However, merely unearthing women's literature did not ensure its prominence; in order to assess women's writings the number of preconceptions inherent in a literary canon dominated by male beliefs and male writers needed to be re-evaluated. Betty Friedan's The Feminist Mystique (1963), Kate Millet's Sexual Politics (1970), Teresa de Lauretis's Alice Doesn't: Feminism, Semiotics, Cinema (1984), Annette Kolodny's The Lay of the Land (1975), Judith Fetterly's The Resisting Reader (1978), Elaine Showalter's A Literature of Their Own (1977), or Sandra Gilbert and Susan Gubar's The Madwoman in the Attic (1979) are just a handful of the many critiques that questioned cultural, sexual, intellectual, and/or psychological stereotypes about women.

Key Terms (this list is woefully inadequate; suggestions for additional terms would be appreciated):

Androgyny - taken from Women Studies page of Drew University - "'...suggests a world in which sex-roles are not rigidly defined, a state in which ‘the man in every woman' and the ‘woman in every man' could be integrated and freely expressed' (Tuttle 19). Used more frequently in the 1970's, this term was used to describe a blurring, or combination of gender roles so that neither masculinity or femininity is dominant."

Backlash - a term, which may have originated with Susan Faludi, referring to a movement ( ca. 1980s) away from or against feminism.

Écriture féminine - Écriture féminine, literally women's writing, is a philosophy that promotes women's experiences and feelings to the point that it strengthens the work. Hélène Cixous first uses this term in her essay, "The Laugh of the Medusa," in which she asserts, "Woman must write her self: must write about women and bring women to writing, from which they have been driven away as violently as from their bodies. Écriture féminine places experience before language, and privileges the anti-linear, cyclical writing so often frowned upon by patriarchal society' (Wikipedia).

Essentialism - taken from Women Studies page of Drew University - "The belief in a uniquely feminine essence, existing above and beyond cultural conditioning...the mirror image of biologism which for centuries justified the oppression of women by proclaiming the natural superiority of men (Tuttle 90)." Tong's use of the term is relative to the explanation of the division of radical feminism into radical-cultural and radical libertarian.

Gynocentrics - "a term coined by the feminist scholar-critic Elaine Showalter to define the process of constructing "a female framework for analysis of women's literature [in order] to develop new models [of interpretation] based on the study of female experience, rather than to adapt to male models and theories'" (Bressler 269, see General Resources below).

Jouissance - a term most commonly associated with Helene Cixous (seek-sou), whose use of the word may have derived from Jacques Lacan - "Cixous follows Lacan's psychoanalytic paradigm, which argues that a child must separate from its mother's body (the Real) in order to enter into the Symbolic. Because of this, Cixous says, the female body in general becomes unrepresentable in language; it's what can't be spoken or written in the phallogocentric Symbolic order. Cixous here makes a leap from the maternal body to the female body in general; she also leaps from that female body to female sexuality, saying that female sexuality, female sexual pleasure, feminine jouissance, is unrepresentable within the phallogocentric Symbolic order" (Dr. Mary Klages, "Postructuralist Feminist Theory")

Patriarchy - "Sexism is perpetuated by systems of patriarchy where male-dominated structures and social arrangements elaborate the oppression of women. Patriarchy almost by definition also exhibits androcentrism, meaning male centered. Coupled with patriarchy, androcentrism assumes that male norms operate through out all social institutions and become the standard to which all persons adhere" (Joe Santillan - University of California at Davis).

Phallologocentrism - "language ordered around an absolute Word (logos) which is “masculine” [phallic], systematically excludes, disqualifies, denigrates, diminishes, silences the “feminine” (Nikita Dhawan).

Second- and Third-Wave feminism - "Second-wave feminism refers to a period of feminist thought that originated around the 1960s and was mainly concerned with independence and greater political action to improve women's rights" (Wikipedia). "Third-wave feminism is a feminist movement that arguably began in the early 1990s. Unlike second-wave feminism, which largely focused on the inclusion of women in traditionally male-dominated areas, third-wave feminism seeks to challenge and expand common definitions of gender and sexuality" (Wikipedia).

Semiotic - "[Julia] Kristeva (kris-TAYV-veh) makes a distinction between the semiotic and symbolic modes of communication:

Further Reading

# Cixous (seek-sou), Hélène. "The Laugh of the Medusa" or "Sorties: Out & Out: Attacks/Ways Out/Forays."
# Flax, Jane. Thinking Fragments: Psychoanalysis, Feminism and Postmodernism in the Contemporary West, 1990.
# Gallop, Jane. The Daughter's Seduction: Feminism and Psychoanalysis, 1982.
# Grosz, E. A. (Elizabeth A.) Sexual Subversions: Three French Feminists. Boston : Allen & Unwin, 1989.
# Irigaray, Luce. Speculum of the Other Woman. Ithaca, N.Y : Cornell University Press, 1985. HQ1154 .I7413 1985
# Kristeva (kris-TAYV-veh), Julia. The Kristeva Reader. Ed. Toril Moi, 1986.
# Marks, Elaine, and Isabelle de Courtivron, eds. New French Feminism. Brighton: Harvester, 1980.
# Moi, Toril. Sexual/textual Politics: Feminist Literary Theory. London ; New York : Methuen, 1985.PN98.W64 M65 1985


which one is much easier to apply as an approach to analyze a novel..
tq..
humanoid - 16/02/2011 05:21 PM
#55

wow that's a lot of theories! that great, Banny123 \)

I'm interesting in literary fictions, reads some of the well-known works though not much, but not majoring in English and I do not pay much attention during my studies in Bahasa, and so my knowledge in linguistic and literary devices are very minim.

I do not understand how I use all of these theories (I barely understands what all those theories are about). In interpreting a novel, Should I at least know a bit about these concepts in order to get a thorough understanding of a novel? I usually just read it through and just trying to know what is the author's trying to say, and just enjoy the narrative.

I sometimes notice symbolisms when they appear but most of the time I did not or not understand the symbolic meaning. So I'd like to ask, what's the proper way in interpreting a novel? should i connect the writings with those theories or there is other easier way? I can read sparknotes.com for interpretation but that would be no fun, right D

I do, however, read Notes From Underground by Fyodor Dostoyevsky and knowing that one of the themes is existentialism. I does get a bit more understanding about what's the author is trying to say, but the language difficulties in that novel is, to me, very high. So mostly, in the first part of the novel, it's hard to understand.
JekiCompaqCQ40 - 24/02/2011 10:29 AM
#56
need more information about Psychoanalysis literary criticism
dear all literature criticism geek,
I'm gona conduct a research using Psychoanalis approach and need some information about it, so, is there somebody in here who can help me with this
tx before..

shakehand2
Zahriansyah - 24/02/2011 10:08 PM
#57

Cool Thread..
Wish all the threads in Kaskus were just like this..
Heheheh
Reminds me all those sleepless nights writing my thesis on Franz Kafka's The Metamorphosis

Salute to you Mr Banny
iloveindonesiailoveindonesia
MaheRz. - 28/03/2011 03:33 AM
#58

hello there, could u help me, to find out about " Heroism : on literary criticsm?
i have problem on my thesis.. \( \(

thanks b4
PeterBean - 31/03/2011 03:52 PM
#59

even though my english major is linguistic, i am able to use it for analyzing any literary assingment. Thanks man.
dirana - 16/05/2011 11:11 PM
#60

i graduated from english literature..
my thesis is about castration..
i used three edgar allan poe's short stories and analyzed it with freud's theory..


the title of my thesis is "the representation of motive murder in three edgar allan poe's short story"
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