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supercanada - 20/05/2010 01:55 AM
#1
Canada Temporary Foreign Worker Program
DISCLAIMER: Kalo informasi dibawah ini perlu diterjemahkan ke Bahasa Indonesia buat anda, berarti tret ini bukan untuk anda.

STEPS FOR A CANADIAN COMPANY TO HIRE A FOREIGN WORKER:

1. Employers must advertise the job opportunity to Canadians and Permanent Residents first.

2. If there are no Canadians or permanent residents available for the job, the employer can recruit a qualified foreign worker.

3. The employer can then make an offer of employment to the foreign worker.

4. The employer then completes the application for a Labour Market Opinion.

5. If the Labour Market Opinion is positive, the employer sends a copy to the foreign worker.

6. The foreign worker then applies for a work permit in their country of residence (outside Canada).

7. The foreign worker must then prove that he / she meets the job and admission to Canada requirements.
supercanada - 20/05/2010 02:06 AM
#2

Steps to Hire Temporary Foreign Workers
From HRSDC Website
http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/eng/workplaceskills/foreign_workers/temp_workers.shtml

Employing foreign workers can be an essential part of a company's business strategy. Foreign workers can fill labour shortages in Canada and bring new skills and knowledge to help the country's economy grow.
Hiring Steps:

In almost all cases, foreign workers must have a valid work permit to work in Canada. When hiring a foreign worker, you, the employer must generally :

1. Submit an application for a Labour Market Opinion (LMO) to the Service Canada Centre responsible for processing applications.

Before confirming a job offer, Human Resources and Skills Development Canada (HRSDC)/Service Canada considers whether :
* The job offer is genuine;
* The wages and working conditions are comparable to those offered to Canadians working in the occupation;
* Employers conducted reasonable efforts to hire or train Canadians for the job;
* The foreign worker is filling a labour shortage;
* The employment of the foreign worker will directly create new job opportunities or help retain jobs for Canadians;
* The foreign worker will transfer new skills and knowledge to Canadians; and
* The hiring of the foreign worker will not affect a labour disputes or the employment of any Canadian worker involved in such a dispute.

A Quebec Acceptance Certificate (CAQ) issued by the province is also required for jobs in Quebec.

2. Once HRSDC/Service Canada approves the job offer, send a copy of the HRSDC/Service Canada LMO confirmation letter to the foreign worker.

3. Inform the foreign worker to apply for a work permit from Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC).

Next, CIC decides whether the foreign worker will get a work permit according to the requirements to work and reside temporarily in Canada.

A LMO may be revoked prior to the issuance of a work permit under the following circumstances:

* The application included false or misleading information; or
* New facts come to light subsequent to the date of the issuance of the opinion that would have affected the assessment of the application and that, in turn, change the opinion that the employment of the foreign national would likely have a neutral or positive effect on the labour market in Canada; or
* The opinion was based on a mistake as to some material fact.

The revocation of a LMO decision is based on reliable documented evidence that confirms that the new information or altered circumstances would have had an impact on the assessment of the six factors listed under section 203(3) of the Immigration and Refugee Protection Regulations.

When a positive LMO decision is replaced with a negative decision, employers have to submit a new LMO application before they can hire temporary foreign workers.
supercanada - 20/05/2010 02:20 AM
#3
Live-In Caregiver Program
Live-in Caregiver Program
From HRSDC Website

Employing foreign live-in caregivers when Canadian workers or permanent residents are not available, can help families care for children, the elderly or persons with disabilities.

Employers who want to hire live-in caregivers must apply to Human Resources and Skills Development Canada/Service Canada for a labour market opinion. A Labour Market Opinion assesses what impact hiring a foreign worker would have on Canada's labour market.

A foreign live-in caregiver who wants to work in Canada must have received a job offer from a Canadian employer and apply to Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC) for a work permit. The caregiver's application must include proof that the employer received a positive Labour Market Opinion from Service Canada.

Effective April 1, 2010, live-in caregivers working in Canada under the Live-in Caregiver Program:

* have up to four years from the date of their arrival in Canada to complete the employment requirement to be eligible for permanent residence under the live-in caregiver class; and
* may choose between two options for calculating their employment requirement for permanent residence:
o 24 months of authorized full-time employment, or
o 3,900 hours (within a minimum of 22 months which may include a maximum of 390 hours of overtime) of authorized full-time employment.

You must agree to the following conditions if you want to hire a live-in caregiver.

The live-in caregiver must:

* Work for you in a private home
* Live with you, the employer, or in the household where care is to be provided
* Have a private, furnished room within your home
* Be employed on a full-time basis
* Meet the requirements set by Citizenship and Immigration Canada for the Live-in Caregiver Program

You, the employer, must:

* Pay for the caregiver’s health insurance at no cost to the caregiver until he/she becomes eligible for provincial health insurance.
* Enrol the live-in caregiver in provincial workplace safety insurance (also known as workers’ compensation) or equivalent insurance if the former is not available.
* Pay for the services, fees and costs of a recruitment or third party agency if you are using one for recruiting the caregiver. Employers are not permitted to recoup recruitment fees from live-in caregivers.
* Pay for transportation costs for the caregiver to travel from the caregiver’s country of permanent residence to the location of work in Canada (where caregiving will take place). Or if the caregiver is already in Canada, the employer must pay the transportation costs for the caregiver to travel to the new place of work in Canada.
* Submit to HRSDC/Service Canada an employment contract with the Labour Market Opinion application to hire a foreign live-in caregiver. The employment contract must include the duration of the contract, duties of the position, wages, hours of work (including overtime, holidays, and sick leave), accommodation arrangements, as per provincial and municipal standards; transportation costs; health insurance; terms of resignation and termination; and registration for provincial workplace safety insurance.

You the employer must also:

* Keep records of the number of regular and overtime hours the live-in caregiver has worked for you on a weekly/monthly basis. The caregiver will need this information for their application for permanent residence.
* Review and adjust the foreign caregiver's wages to ensure they meet or exceed HRSDC's requirements (as per HRSDC's Wages table).
* Ensure that you are not employing a foreign national other than in a capacity they are authorized to work (you should ask to see, but not keep, their work permit to ensure that you are identified as the authorized employer and to confirm the duration of that authorization). Remember, you are not permitted to take away the work permit from the caregiver or keep it.
* Ensure that you are not employing a live-in caregiver without a valid work permit identifying you specifically as the employer.

If you, the employer, agree to all the conditions mentioned above, you can apply to Service Canada for a labour market opinion. The opinion will assess the impact hiring the live-in caregiver would have on Canadian jobs.

While authorized to work for a specific employer, a live-in caregiver cannot:

* Work for more than one employer at a time or for any employer or under any conditions other than that authorized on their work permit; and
* Work for a health agency or labour contractor, or in day care or foster care.


Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC) Requirements for a Foreigner to Work as a Live-In Caregiver in Canada
From CIC Website

You must meet certain requirements to be eligible for the Live‑in Caregiver Program in Canada.

You will need:

A positive Labour Market Opinion (LMO) from an employer in Canada

Before hiring you, your employer must:

* apply to Human Resources and Skills Development Canada/Service Canada (HRSDC/SC) to have his or her suggested job offer reviewed; and
* receive a positive Labour Market Opinion (LMO) from HRSDC/SC.

HRSDC/SC will assess your employer’s job offer and the employment contract to be sure that it meets the requirements for wages and working conditions and the provincial labour and employment standards, and that there are not enough Canadians or permanent residents available to work as live-in caregivers in Canada. If HRSDC/SC finds the job offer acceptable, they will issue a positive LMO to your employer.

You will need a copy of this positive LMO when you apply for a work permit.

A written contract with your future employer, signed by you and your employer

You and your future employer are legally required to sign a written employment contract. You must submit the signed contract with your work permit application. This must be the same employment contract submitted to HRSDC/SC by your employer, unless you provide an explanation of any changes (for example, a new start date).

The written employment contract will ensure there is a fair working arrangement between you and your employer.

The employment contract must demonstrate that the Live-in Caregiver Program requirements are met by including a description of:

* mandatory employer-paid benefits, including:
o transportation to Canada from your country of permanent residence or the country of habitual residence to the location of work in Canada
o medical insurance coverage provided from the date of your arrival until you are eligible for provincial health insurance
o workplace safety insurance coverage for the duration of the employment
o all recruitment fees, including any amount payable to a third-party recruiter or agents hired by the employer that would otherwise have been charged to you
* job duties
* hours of work
* wages
* accommodation arrangements (including room and board)
* holiday and sick leave entitlements
* termination and resignation terms

The contract template is different for the province of Quebec and is available on the ministère de l’Immigration et des Communautés culturelles (Quebec Immigration) website.

Successful completion of the equivalent of a Canadian secondary school education

You must have successfully completed the equivalent of Canadian high school education (secondary school). Because of the differences in school systems across Canada, it is not possible to give a precise number of years. In most provinces, it takes 12 years of schooling to obtain a Canadian high school diploma. The immigration officer assessing your application will let you know what is needed.

At least six months’ training or at least one year of full-time paid work experience as a caregiver or in a related field or occupation (including six months with one employer) in the past three years

To claim work experience, you need to have worked for one year, including at least six months of continuous employment for the same employer. This work experience must be in a field or occupation similar to what you will do as a live-in caregiver. This experience must have been acquired within the three years immediately before the day on which you make an application for a work permit as a caregiver.

To claim training, it must have been full-time training in a classroom setting. Areas of study could be early childhood education, geriatric care, pediatric nursing or first aid.

Good knowledge of English or French

You must be able to speak, read and understand either English or French so that you can function on your own in your employer’s home. For example, you must be able to call emergency services if they are needed, and to understand labels on medication. You will be unsupervised for most of the day and may have to communicate with someone outside the home. You can also read and understand your rights and obligations if you can function in English or French.

A work permit before you enter Canada

If your application is successful, you will receive a letter of introduction from the Canadian visa office responsible for your area. You will need to present this letter to the Border Services Officer upon arrival in Canada in order to obtain your work permit.
John Connor - 03/06/2010 12:27 PM
#4

nice tret...
losngana - 09/06/2010 06:58 AM
#5

ane belum nemu ada yg bahas ini di kaskus


kalo datang ke canada pake visitor visa.

apakah mungkin, mengajukan work permit dari dalam canada ?
dengan kondisi visitor visa masih valid

supercanada - 09/06/2010 08:08 PM
#6

Quote:
Original Posted By losngana
ane belum nemu ada yg bahas ini di kaskus


kalo datang ke canada pake visitor visa.

apakah mungkin, mengajukan work permit dari dalam canada ?
dengan kondisi visitor visa masih valid



Secara garis besar...jawaban nya adalah Tidak Bisa. Dan karena orang Indonesia butuh Temporary Resident Visa, work permit tidak bisa diajukan di port of entry juga (airport dan border). Sebetulnya bisa saja apply di Candian consulate di USA tapi biasanya konsulat atau embassy hanya mau memproses orang yang memang tinggal di jurisdiksi mereka. Karena itu, orang Indonesia yang di Canada sebagai visitor, harus pulang dulu ke Indonesia untuk apply Working visa dan working permit. Paling cuma ada pengecualian kalo masuk ke dalam section 186, yaitu sudah berkerja di Canada tanpa perlu work permit. Ini regulations nya:

http://laws.justice.gc.ca/eng/SOR-2002-227/page-6.html#anchorbo-ga:l_11-gb:l_2

Application after entry
199. A foreign national may apply for a work permit after entering Canada if they
(a) hold a work permit;
(b) are working in Canada under the authority of section 186 and are not a business visitor within the meaning of section 187;
(c) hold a study permit;
(d) hold a temporary resident permit issued under subsection 24(1) of the Act that is valid for at least six months;
(e) are a family member of a person described in any of paragraphs (a) to (d);
(f) are in a situation described in section 206 or 207;
(g) applied for a work permit before entering Canada and the application was approved in writing but they have not been issued the permit;
(h) are applying as a trader or investor, intra-company transferee or professional, as described in Section B, C or D of Annex 1603 of the Agreement, within the meaning of subsection 2(1) of the North American Free Trade Agreement Implementation Act, and their country of citizenship — being a country party to that Agreement — grants to Canadian citizens who submit a similar application within that country treatment equivalent to that accorded by Canada to citizens of that country who submit an application within Canada, including treatment in respect of an authorization for multiple entries based on a single application; or
(i) hold a written statement from the Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade stating that it has no objection to the foreign national working at a foreign mission in Canada.

No permit required
186. A foreign national may work in Canada without a work permit
(a) as a business visitor to Canada within the meaning of section 187;
(b) as a foreign representative, if they are properly accredited by the Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade and are in Canada to carry out official duties as a diplomatic agent, consular officer, representative or official of a country other than Canada, of the United Nations or any of its agencies or of any international organization of which Canada is a member;
(c) if the foreign national is a family member of a foreign representative in Canada who is accredited with diplomatic status by the Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade and that Department has stated in writing that it does not object to the foreign national working in Canada;
(d) as a member of the armed forces of a country that is a designated state for the purposes of the Visiting Forces Act, including a person who has been designated as a civilian component of those armed forces;
(e) as an officer of a foreign government sent, under an exchange agreement between Canada and one or more countries, to take up duties with a federal or provincial agency;
(f) if they are a full-time student, on the campus of the university or college at which they are a full-time student, for the period for which they hold a study permit to study at that university or college;
(g) as a performing artist appearing alone or in a group in an artistic performance — other than a performance that is primarily for a film production or a television or radio broadcast — or as a member of the staff of such a performing artist or group who is integral to the artistic performance, if
(i) they are part of a foreign production or group, or are a guest artist in a Canadian production or group, performing a time-limited engagement, and
(ii) they are not in an employment relationship with the organization or business in Canada that is contracting for their services, nor performing in a bar, restaurant or similar establishment;
(h) as a participant in sports activities or events, in Canada, either as an individual participant or as a member of a foreign-based team or Canadian amateur team;
(i) as an employee of a foreign news company for the purpose of reporting on events in Canada;
(j) as a guest speaker for the sole purpose of making a speech or delivering a paper at a dinner, graduation, convention or similar function, or as a commercial speaker or seminar leader delivering a seminar that lasts no longer than five days;
(k) as a member of the executive of a committee that is organizing a convention or meeting in Canada or as a member of the administrative support staff of such a committee;
(l) as a person who is responsible for assisting a congregation or group in the achievement of its spiritual goals and whose main duties are to preach doctrine, perform functions related to gatherings of the congregation or group or provide spiritual counselling;
(m) as a judge, referee or similar official at an international amateur sports competition, an international cultural or artistic event or competition or an animal or agricultural competition;
(n) as an examiner or evaluator of research proposals, academic projects or programs or university theses;
(o) as an expert who conducts surveys or analyses that are to be used as evidence before a federal or provincial regulatory body, a tribunal or a court of law or as an expert witness before such a body, tribunal or court of law;
(p) as a student in a health field, including as a medical elective or clinical clerk at a medical teaching institution in Canada, for the primary purpose of acquiring training, if they have written approval from the body that regulates that field;
(q) as a civil aviation inspector of a national aeronautical authority conducting inspections of the flight operation procedures or cabin safety of a commercial air carrier operating international flights;
(r) as an accredited representative or adviser participating in an aviation accident or incident investigation conducted under the Canadian Transportation Accident Investigation and Safety Board Act;
(s) as a member of a crew who is employed by a foreign company aboard a means of transportation that
(i) is foreign-owned and not registered in Canada, and
(ii) is engaged primarily in international transportation;
(t) as a provider of emergency services, including medical services, for the protection or preservation of life or property; or
(u) until a decision is made on an application made by them under subsection 201(1), if they have remained in Canada after the expiry of their work permit and they have continued to comply with the conditions set out on the expired work permit, other than the expiry date.

Business visitors
187. (1) For the purposes of paragraph 186(a), a business visitor to Canada is a foreign national who is described in subsection (2) or who seeks to engage in international business activities in Canada without directly entering the Canadian labour market.

Specific cases
(2) The following foreign nationals are business visitors:
(a) foreign nationals purchasing Canadian goods or services for a foreign business or government, or receiving training or familiarization in respect of such goods or services;
(b) foreign nationals receiving or giving training within a Canadian parent or subsidiary of the corporation that employs them outside Canada, if any production of goods or services that results from the training is incidental; and
(c) foreign nationals representing a foreign business or government for the purpose of selling goods for that business or government, if the foreign national is not engaged in making sales to the general public in Canada.

Factors
(3) For the purpose of subsection (1), a foreign national seeks to engage in international business activities in Canada without directly entering the Canadian labour market only if
(a) the primary source of remuneration for the business activities is outside Canada; and
(b) the principal place of business and actual place of accrual of profits remain predominately outside Canada.
dewita79 - 10/06/2010 04:16 AM
#7

usulin ke momod buat disticky bro o
LiveinMars - 19/06/2010 11:00 PM
#8

>>>http://www.humanioracenter.comada yg pernah proses lewat sini? thx
supercanada - 23/06/2010 04:33 PM
#9

Quote:
Original Posted By LiveinMars
>>>http://www.humanioracenter.comada yg pernah proses lewat sini? thx


jangan deh, mereka itu kayanya engga legit. Masa buat training 6 bulan jadi nanny mesti bayar $4000? udah gitu, kalo dapat penempatan kerja, mesti bayar lagi $200 plus potongan gaji selama 12 bulan yg total nya $2900. belon lagi ada biaya aplikasi $200, biaya buku $110, n biaya pengiriman $55. jadi total yg mesti dikeluarkan sekitar $10,000. kalo punya uang segitu, mendingan buat bisnis di Indonesia aja atau sekolah.
LiveinMars - 25/06/2010 07:07 PM
#10

100 jt? baru sadar saya! ok, thx!!
LiveinMars - 25/06/2010 07:08 PM
#11

100 jt? baru sadar saya! ok, thx!!
thokenk - 21/07/2010 11:33 PM
#12
mohon pencerahannya thx
Quote:
Original Posted By supercanada
jangan deh, mereka itu kayanya engga legit. Masa buat training 6 bulan jadi nanny mesti bayar $4000? udah gitu, kalo dapat penempatan kerja, mesti bayar lagi $200 plus potongan gaji selama 12 bulan yg total nya $2900. belon lagi ada biaya aplikasi $200, biaya buku $110, n biaya pengiriman $55. jadi total yg mesti dikeluarkan sekitar $10,000. kalo punya uang segitu, mendingan buat bisnis di Indonesia aja atau sekolah.


hi supercanada, saya sangat ingin bisa bekerja di canada sebagai cook, saya sudah coba melamar di internet langsung ke user tapi so far belum ada hasil. apakah ada agency yang bisa membantu kita yg ingin bekerja di canada, tapi yg tidak memungut fee. setau saya sekarang sudah tidak boleh lagi memungut fee dari job seeker. mohon dibantu jika tau jawabannya. terimakasih.
thokenk - 21/07/2010 11:36 PM
#13

Quote:
Original Posted By supercanada
jangan deh, mereka itu kayanya engga legit. Masa buat training 6 bulan jadi nanny mesti bayar $4000? udah gitu, kalo dapat penempatan kerja, mesti bayar lagi $200 plus potongan gaji selama 12 bulan yg total nya $2900. belon lagi ada biaya aplikasi $200, biaya buku $110, n biaya pengiriman $55. jadi total yg mesti dikeluarkan sekitar $10,000. kalo punya uang segitu, mendingan buat bisnis di Indonesia aja atau sekolah.


hi supercanada, saya sangat ingin bisa bekerja di canada sebagai cook, saya sudah coba melamar di internet langsung ke user tapi so far belum ada hasil. apakah ada agency yang bisa membantu kita yg ingin bekerja di canada, tapi yg tidak memungut fee. setau saya sekarang sudah tidak boleh lagi memungut fee dari job seeker. mohon dibantu jika tau jawabannya. terimakasih.
doridori - 30/07/2010 09:54 AM
#14

wah bagus ya


info berguna gan tq
timoes - 24/08/2010 03:26 PM
#15

Quote:
Original Posted By supercanada

No permit required
186. A foreign national may work in Canada without a work permit

(s) as a member of a crew who is employed by a foreign company aboard a means of transportation that
(i) is foreign-owned and not registered in Canada, and
(ii) is engaged primarily in international transportation;


Halo gan, mohon pencerahan...ane gawe di cruise ship, beberapa kali ke beberapa kota dibagian barat canada, misal kan ane jump ship tanpa pasport (karena pasport ane dsimpen dkapal) di kota tersebut, bagaimana kemungkinan ane bs bertahan hidup / mendapatkan pekerjaan (labour)..??? soalnya setau ane ilegal di CAD lebih sulit dpt kerja di banding US, dan bagaimana kemungkinan nya kalau ane langsung ke imigration lawyer untuk di bantu urus PR atau apalah untuk membantu status ane yang ilegal...mohon advice nya, karena msh awam bgt masalah begini, thanks
Deja.Vu - 24/08/2010 11:09 PM
#16

Quote:
Original Posted By timoes


Halo gan, mohon pencerahan...ane gawe di cruise ship, beberapa kali ke beberapa kota dibagian barat canada, misal kan ane jump ship tanpa pasport (karena pasport ane dsimpen dkapal) di kota tersebut, bagaimana kemungkinan ane bs bertahan hidup / mendapatkan pekerjaan (labour)..??? soalnya setau ane ilegal di CAD lebih sulit dpt kerja di banding US, dan bagaimana kemungkinan nya kalau ane langsung ke imigration lawyer untuk di bantu urus PR atau apalah untuk membantu status ane yang ilegal...mohon advice nya, karena msh awam bgt masalah begini, thanks

Sebelumnya,ane mohon maap kalo duluan memberi komenter dr pda sepupuh disini y..D

untuk kasus agan,ane bknny mo membuat harapan agan jd luntur..
tapi klo mslh agan itu impossible bngt deh gan..
jgnkn tak ad passport,ad passport pun klo mn buat PR susah ny minta ampun..
agan pny visa kerja aj gk gmpang urus PR nya..
jd jgn trlalu brharap gan,agan aj tao kn canada itu lebi susah dr AS..
lawyer jg bakalan gk bs bntu agan de,yg ad agan akn ditahan n dideportasi plg klo mpe ketaoan pemerintah sana..
klo seperti yg agan blg k immigration lawyer lgsg diurus n bisa dpt PR..mgkn smua org skrg ud ikutin cara aganCanada Temporary Foreign Worker Program
Aloyziuz - 25/08/2010 02:01 PM
#17

iloveindonesia iloveindonesia iloveindonesia
timoes - 26/08/2010 10:02 PM
#18

Quote:
Original Posted By Deja.Vu
Sebelumnya,ane mohon maap kalo duluan memberi komenter dr pda sepupuh disini y..D

untuk kasus agan,ane bknny mo membuat harapan agan jd luntur..
tapi klo mslh agan itu impossible bngt deh gan..
jgnkn tak ad passport,ad passport pun klo mn buat PR susah ny minta ampun..
agan pny visa kerja aj gk gmpang urus PR nya..
jd jgn trlalu brharap gan,agan aj tao kn canada itu lebi susah dr AS..
lawyer jg bakalan gk bs bntu agan de,yg ad agan akn ditahan n dideportasi plg klo mpe ketaoan pemerintah sana..
klo seperti yg agan blg k immigration lawyer lgsg diurus n bisa dpt PR..mgkn smua org skrg ud ikutin cara aganCanada Temporary Foreign Worker Program


Ok bro Deja.Vu, thanks atas pencerahan nya...ilovekaskus
supercanada - 27/08/2010 01:33 PM
#19

Quote:
Original Posted By timoes
Halo gan, mohon pencerahan...ane gawe di cruise ship, beberapa kali ke beberapa kota dibagian barat canada, misal kan ane jump ship tanpa pasport (karena pasport ane dsimpen dkapal) di kota tersebut, bagaimana kemungkinan ane bs bertahan hidup / mendapatkan pekerjaan (labour)..??? soalnya setau ane ilegal di CAD lebih sulit dpt kerja di banding US, dan bagaimana kemungkinan nya kalau ane langsung ke imigration lawyer untuk di bantu urus PR atau apalah untuk membantu status ane yang ilegal...mohon advice nya, karena msh awam bgt masalah begini, thanks


terus terang aja, kemungkinan ente buat bertahan hidup bakalan bener2 tipis. Satu...kalo ente jump ship, perusahaan cruise ship yg ente gawe bakalan didenda sama pemerintah Canada $25,000. Jadi mereka bakalan berusaha keras buat nemuin ente. terus pemerintah Canada juga bakalan tahu ente itu siapa soalnya passport nya bakalan diserahin ke imigrasi canada sama perusahaan cruise ship nya. dan pemerintah canada bakal keluarin arrest warrant (surat tangkep) dan ente bakalan jadi buronan.

Dua, ente ga bakalan ada passport jadi ga bakal ada dokumen identitas sama sekali. jadi mo ngapain aja di canada bakalan susah. dan lupain aja buat urus PR. buronan ya udah pasti ga bakal bisa apply PR. kalo ente nemuin lawyer yang mau bantuin, begitu aplikasi ente masuk, langsung deh disergap ama imigrasi dan di deport.

kalo saran ane, mendingan ente kerja terus di cruise ship. kan gaji udah lumayan. dan kalo ente rajin dan mau belajar, siapa tahu bisa jadi officer...kan gaji nya tambah lumayan.
timoes - 28/08/2010 12:05 PM
#20

To bro supercanada: thanks atas pencerahan nya...ane jadi mikir 1000x deh, sebenernya ane juga gak mau jadi ilegal alien...sekedar menaksir resiko/kemungkinan2 nya aja, soal nya masuk CAD dgn visa kerja kaya nya susah, agen jg kayanya gak ada yg jelas...any suggestions?
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