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Ambrosiana - 14/06/2011 07:21 PM
#181

Quote:
Original Posted By sarasvathi
Yeah I think so...
I did several translation project last semester but those are free as I did it to my closed-friends...

Maybe, I should think about being a freelance translator next semester.
and don't worry I will bother you to ask this and that....D

Gyahahaha... One of the sign of 'professionality' is dare to charge your service...
Certainly you can do it cheaper than the average market price.
for further discussion about how to charge your service, you can see on the index in first page, since I forgot where's the discussion exactly...

If you want to find some projects, you can start from Computer Rental or Internet Cafe near your University. As far as I know, many of them offer translation service, and they used to outsource their project to freelance translator. It's a good place to begin. Moreover if you can find a Senior Translator who can act as your Editor. So you can also learn to improve your translation quality.

Quote:
Original Posted By ndrazzoholic
no mas bro .. I said i i live in french speaking country, but not in france. it is one of french colonies in pacific island ( I`ve PM you the name of the country ; ) ) and to be french-Indonesian translator is so far far away from my touch malus I`ve just started to try to be an English - Indonesian translator .. and please wish me luck Yb

btw where do you get those attractive monkeys?? i want one please.. D


Oh... That's too bad. Learn French immediately! The competition is not as crowd as English - Bahasa Indonesia. You have the chance and resource to do that...

Btw, you can find the monkey Emoticons at www.laymark.com.
Gyahahaha...
How to start working as translator (tips to enter translation world)
searchmeggy - 14/06/2011 07:58 PM
#182

Wow, so glad I find this forum, since I'm an amateur freelance translator.. malus

Once my close friend asked me to translate her assignment, and it was about 7-page work. I didn't ask for charge, since it was an urgent and she needed to present it the next day. So, yes, I did it for free. Honestly, I was thinking to ask for charge, but I was too "sungkan". She is my best friend.

Well, just so you know, I have a group of best friends (as common girls have) which most of them come from middle-low social class. That makes me soooooo "sungkan" (again) if I ask for charge (regardless being called arrogant, I come from higher social class). nohope:

Do you have any comment on my experience? How should I deal with it next time?

By the way, it's nice to have this kind of forum, sharing things I had never known before. I can practice my English with pros as well. \) I'm sorry if I have 'not so fluent' English.
Ambrosiana - 14/06/2011 08:43 PM
#183

Quote:
Original Posted By searchmeggy
Wow, so glad I find this forum, since I'm an amateur freelance translator.. malus

Once my close friend asked me to translate her assignment, and it was about 7-page work. I didn't ask for charge, since it was an urgent and she needed to present it the next day. So, yes, I did it for free. Honestly, I was thinking to ask for charge, but I was too "sungkan". She is my best friend.

Well, just so you know, I have a group of best friends (as common girls have) which most of them come from middle-low social class. That makes me soooooo "sungkan" (again) if I ask for charge (regardless being called arrogant, I come from higher social class). nohope:

Do you have any comment on my experience? How should I deal with it next time?

By the way, it's nice to have this kind of forum, sharing things I had never known before. I can practice my English with pros as well. \) I'm sorry if I have 'not so fluent' English.

You should charge them!
How to start working as translator (tips to enter translation world)

One of the definition of professional is "Performed by persons receiving pay" (Source)
I'm afraid that you'll get used to 'not receiving payment' and it would have bad effect for your future career. There are times that you can give your skill for free. Example: for charity needs; but you should avoid to do that to people who actually have capability to pay your work. You deserve it!

In this case, since your 'clients' are your close friends, I suggest you to say them:
"Kalo aku terjemahin dapet apa nih..."
"Dibayar berapa nih? Lagi sibuk ni soalnya..."

or you can make a kind of declaration to your friends like this:
"Hey guys, you know what, I try to work as freelance translator... So you please please call me if you have any project for me, I will give you some commission..."

Since they know that you intend to work as translator, I think if they have pride, they would offer you project (from their own) but certainly they would like to have a discount. As good friend, discount certainly acceptable for your profession... It would be better than let your service uncharge... but please, don't let yourself do that for free. You should have respect to your own skill. Let them offer anything if they have no money, food, cleaning your house, working your other homework, or anything as kind of 'barter' trade.

For your information, I also do some help on Permintaan Bantuan Terjemahan for free, but actually I have other purpose to introduce and promote myself as translator to everybody while I'm learning and sharpen my skill.
As 'feedback', I got some customers who believed in my translating skill and ability.

Let yourself doing your friends' work without any benefits in return - while they actually capable in giving the benefits for you - will poison you. It also would make them lazier...

How to start working as translator (tips to enter translation world)
I wish all success for you on your choice to be translator
loc - 15/06/2011 02:53 AM
#184

Ambro, Monoxdifly, thanks for the kind words but let's get back on track, shall we? \)


Quote:
Original Posted By ndrazzoholic
gyahaha.. I agree with you there! i live in french speaking country and hmm.. yupz.. the way the speak it.. makes me wants to start speaking it as well.. genit:


eh, btw i`m a new comer in this forum. nice to meet y`all iloveindonesias

nice to know you too, ndrazzoholic!


Quote:
Original Posted By sarasvathi
Yeah I think so...
I did several translation project last semester but those are free as I did it to my closed-friends...

Quote:
Original Posted By searchmeggy
Once my close friend asked me to translate her assignment, and it was about 7-page work. I didn't ask for charge, since it was an urgent and she needed to present it the next day. So, yes, I did it for free. Honestly, I was thinking to ask for charge, but I was too "sungkan". She is my best friend.

Well, just so you know, I have a group of best friends (as common girls have) which most of them come from middle-low social class. That makes me soooooo "sungkan" (again) if I ask for charge (regardless being called arrogant, I come from higher social class). nohope:

Quote:
Original Posted By Ambrosiana

You should charge them!
How to start working as translator (tips to enter translation world)

One of the definition of professional is "Performed by persons receiving pay" (Source)
I'm afraid that you'll get used to 'not receiving payment' and it would have bad effect for your future career. There are times that you can give your skill for free. Example: for charity needs; but you should avoid to do that to people who actually have capability to pay your work. You deserve it!

i'll have to agree with Ambrosiana here \) it could be a simple "Okay, but you'll have to buy me dinner at [insert name of a place here]. Deal?" it's part of educating your friends about your professional status. the payment probably won't be money with close friends, but at least they pay D


Quote:
Original Posted By Ambrosiana
* I know a girl named Vindy who's still in College and has worked as translator. She has done some translation projects for School Text-Book. How did I know her?... Because she's one of my partner in doing translation projects. Khukhukhukhukhu... [COLOR="Red"]and she's cute..
...
...
...
Feel free to PM/VM me to ask anything about translation world. I would try to give you answer as far as my knowledge allowed it...[/COLOR]

proof of Ambro mixing business with pleasure in red army: ngacir:
Ambrosiana - 15/06/2011 10:26 AM
#185

Quote:
Original Posted By loc

proof of Ambro mixing business with pleasure in red army: ngacir:


Ah... It's common secret among men
========================================================

Anyway, since I saw there were many people visited this thread declared their intention to be translator, here I share an article from Steve Vlasta Vistek, a freelance translator.
This article gave me insight about the pros to be freelance translator.
I wish all people who want to be translator here enjoyed their work as Steve did...

Quote:

[SIZE="5"]Ten Reasons Why I Am a Freelance Translator

Reason No. 10: I can live wherever I want.

Since in spite of what my brother in Europe thinks about global warming and climate change, there might be something like that going on, if most of Eastern Virginia where I live now is under water a few years from now just as it was a million years ago, I’ll just move someplace else, like Idaho, France, or Australia. Freelance translators can live wherever they want. Sometime they can even move to a place where the taxes are lower, usually just before the taxes are raised again in such a place.

Reason No. 9: I spent a lot of time and money studying languages and now people pay me to study languages.

I majored in Japanese language more than 30 years ago. I never really gave much thought back then to what I would be doing with my education when I graduate. I remember when I was at the “Arbeitsamt” (Unemployment Office) in Nürnberg 30 years ago that the ignorant German dude whose official title was “employment counselor” told me in no uncertain terms that I would not be able to use what I studied at all, at least not anywhere in Nürnberg.

Well, what else than idiotic advice can one expect from a government employee who is paid by taxpayers to give advice to people who can’t figure out on their own how to find work and think that somebody will figure it out for them. Now that I am a freelance patent translator, the rest of my life will be a continuous course in postgraduate studies financed by customers who order translations from me.

Reason No. 8: I don’t have to have a boss anymore.

I used to be an employee for something like 7 years, in something 4 countries on 3 continents (the last number is definitely accurate). No matter where I lived and what kind of work I was doing, I had to have a boss and I had to do what he or she told me to do. The last one, a dumb blonde by the name of Gwenn, actually fired me. Gwenn, wherever you are, I owe you big time! Work is much more fun when you don’t have to listen to a stupid boss.

Reason No. 7: I can write what I think about anything on my blog and say it’s about translation.

The blog is really about me, of course, but since all I do is translate anyway, I can pretend that it is about translating and not about me. I happen to think that translation is a much more interesting subject than most other things that people do for living. For instance, if I were a dentist, would I be writing about the thoughts that are running through my dentist’s head when I am sticking my hands into somebody’s mouth? Yuck!

Machine translation, low rates, long payment deadlines, the absence of singular and plural in Japanese or whether a word is a legitimate unit in the structure of the Japanese language, all of these subjects are much more interesting, at least to me, than what I come across on blogs dealing with other professions.

Reason No. 6: Nobody can fire me when I get old.

This may not seem very important to people in countries where taxpayers still receive things like pension or healthcare in return for their taxes if there are such countries still left on this planet, but because the Wall Street stole most of the pensions that Americans used to have not so long ago, according to recent polls, most Americans will have to work well into their seventies or until they drop dead, whichever comes first. A freelance translator can work until he drops dead without any problems! Nobody cares that translators are still working even though they are 85! We freelance translators are so lucky!!!

Reason No. 5: Let’s face it, I don’t really know anything about anything except how to fake a few languages.

I don’t really don’t know the languages that I am translating that well either, but I can fake them well enough to get paid for translating them to English.

The sad truth is that I don’t really know anything else, at least not well enough so that people would pay me money for it. I had quite a few different jobs: I sort of started as a journalist, then I worked in the tourist industry, but translation pays much better than working for a tour company or even for a news agency. At this point I am too old to learn something else anyway. Like they say, you can’t teach an old dog new tricks.

Reason No. 4: I can take a long break whenever I want.

And I do take a lot of breaks, even when I am really busy, I take a break a few times a day to read a book or watch a movie for a couple hours. When I was an employee, I used to have to pretend that I was busy doing something even if there was nothing to do. Those days are over. Freelance translators don’t have to pretend anything to anybody except maybe that they really do know their languages and understand the subjects that they are translating.

Reason No. 3: I can keep buying cool hi-tech toys and pretend that I need them for my work.

If I want to buy a new computer, a huge computer monitor which has a built-in shower, a really cool cell phone with all the bells and whistles, I can just say that I really need it for my work and that’s that. If I need it for my work, of course I have to buy the stuff and I don’t have to feel guilty about it. Why should I? Even when I buy an iPod, for instance, I really do that only because I can check my work-related e-mail on my iPod, so the expense is clearly justified. I’m pretty sure it’s even tax deductible.

Reason No. 2: If I was not a freelance translator, I would have to have a real job.

If I was an employee, I would have to wake up every morning to the obnoxious sound of my alarm clock, eat a breakfast of cold cereal, drive to work, listen to a stupid boss, in short do the things that most people have to do to pay bills. Freelance translators can just stagger a few steps barefoot and in their pajamas to their office and start checking out blogs to start their working day while drinking their first cup of coffee. Real jobs are for other people.

Reason No. 1: My wife thinks I’m a genius.

She really does. She says at least once a week: “You are really so dumb about most things, but when it comes to languages, you are a regular genius!” In fact she told me more than once that the real reason why she married me was that she does not like foreign languages and absolutely hates looking up words in dictionaries. My wife speaks an interesting version of English which includes Japanese particles “yoissho“, “yo” or “desho?” in most of her English sentences because the English language urgently needs at least a few expressive and melodic Japanese particles to make an otherwise bland and boring language a little bit more palatable (even when she speaks to people who don’t understand Japanese). She does not need any dictionaries any more, all she has to do is ask me what a certain word means and then shut me up if I get too excited about the possible etymology of that word and things like that.

Do you know anybody who has been married for 27 years and whose wife still thinks he is a genius about anything at all? I seriously doubt it. I am pretty sure there is only one such man on this planet … this freelance translator.


Source: http://patenttranslator.wordpress.com/2011/06/08/2916/
[/SIZE]
Monoxdifly - 15/06/2011 01:20 PM
#186

Quote:
Original Posted By Ambrosiana

* Monoxdifly now is still in college but he has worked as translator in Agency near his Uni.


I think you have exaggerated a bit on telling about me. I'm just:
Quote:
Original Posted By Ambrosiana

If you want to find some projects, you can start from Computer Rental or Internet Cafe near your University.

A translator in a Computer Rental.

Quote:
Original Posted By loc
Ambro, Monoxdifly, thanks for the kind words but let's get back on track, shall we? \)


Khihihi48x... Don't worry loc, we have been back on track now... \)
Ambrosiana - 17/06/2011 08:08 AM
#187

Fellow translators, especially in Jakarta,
FAO now needs translator / interpreter for their program. The contract would be 3 months. If you have interest on it, you can send your application directly to the contact mentioned in this letter.

Quote:

From: Christina Dameria
To: [email]devjobsindo@yahoogroups.com[/email]
Sent: Wed, June 15, 2011 8:53:07 AM
Subject: [DevJobsIndo] INTERPRETER/TRANSLATOR (FOR INDONESIAN NATIONALITY ONLY)
FAO-HPAI/T/14/06-114

All applications should be addressed to one of the following:

(1) by mail to:

Operations Support Unit
Office of the FAO Representative in Indonesia,
11th floor Menara Thamrin Building
Jalan M.H. Thamrin Kav.3 Jakarta 10250

(2) by email to [email]FAO-ID@fao.org[/email] FAO-ID at fao.org



Location : FAO Indonesia office based in Jakarta, INDONESIA

Application Deadline :29-Jun-11

Type of Contract :Other

Post Level :Other

Languages Required :English

Duration of Initial Contract :Initially 3 months, with possibility of further
extension as necessary

Background
THIS IS FAO POST, PLEASE SEND DIRECTLY APPLICATION IN LINE WITH APPLICATION
PROCEDURE AS OUTLINED BELOW
I. Organizational Context
Under the overall supervision of the FAO Representative in Indonesia, the ECTAD-

Indonesia Programme Team Leader, and Intl Operations Coordinator/Project Manager

and directly supervised by the Senior Translator, the translator will provide
interpretation and translation services to support the FAO/ GOI Avian Influenza
Control Programme , Indonesia.
Duties and Responsibilities
II. Functions / Key Results Expected
Summary of key functions:
* Provide oral translation from Indonesia into English and vice versa to
technical advisors, project visitors and project personnel during
trainings, workshops, meetings, field visits and researches;
* Translate related project documents as requested;
* Assist in and facilitating contact between technical advisors or
projects visitors and other parties deemed necessary in the course of the
work of the project;
* Assist in taking meeting minutes if required; and
* Perform other related duties as required by the Senior Translator
III. Impact of Results
The key results have an impact on success of HPAI Programme implementation in
Indonesia
Competencies
IV. Competencies
* Demonstrates commitment to FAO vision, mission and values
* Displays cultural, gender, religion, race, nationality and age
sensitivity and adaptability
* Contributes effectively to team work and team outcomes
* Consistently approaches work with energy and a positive, constructive
attitude.
* Demonstrates openness to change and ability to manage complexities.
* Demonstrates strong oral and written communication skills as well as
interpersonal and public relation skills.

Required Skills and Experience
V. Recruitment Qualifications

Education:
Diploma or University (S1) graduate from any related field
Experience:
* Minimum of consecutive two (2) years experience in translation or
interpretation work
* Previous employment in international organizations preferably within UN
specialized agencies
* Possess good, interpersonal and communication skills
* Abitlity to work in a multi – cultural environment with sensitivity and
respect to diversity; and
* Ability to work with minimum supervision
Language Requirements:
Excellent written and spoken English and Bahasa
searchmeggy - 17/06/2011 02:00 PM
#188

Quote:
Original Posted By Ambrosiana

You should charge them!
How to start working as translator (tips to enter translation world)

One of the definition of professional is "Performed by persons receiving pay" (Source)
I'm afraid that you'll get used to 'not receiving payment' and it would have bad effect for your future career. There are times that you can give your skill for free. Example: for charity needs; but you should avoid to do that to people who actually have capability to pay your work. You deserve it!

In this case, since your 'clients' are your close friends, I suggest you to say them:
"Kalo aku terjemahin dapet apa nih..."
"Dibayar berapa nih? Lagi sibuk ni soalnya..."

or you can make a kind of declaration to your friends like this:
"Hey guys, you know what, I try to work as freelance translator... So you please please call me if you have any project for me, I will give you some commission..."

Since they know that you intend to work as translator, I think if they have pride, they would offer you project (from their own) but certainly they would like to have a discount. As good friend, discount certainly acceptable for your profession... It would be better than let your service uncharge... but please, don't let yourself do that for free. You should have respect to your own skill. Let them offer anything if they have no money, food, cleaning your house, working your other homework, or anything as kind of 'barter' trade.

For your information, I also do some help on Permintaan Bantuan Terjemahan for free, but actually I have other purpose to introduce and promote myself as translator to everybody while I'm learning and sharpen my skill.
As 'feedback', I got some customers who believed in my translating skill and ability.

Let yourself doing your friends' work without any benefits in return - while they actually capable in giving the benefits for you - will poison you. It also would make them lazier...

How to start working as translator (tips to enter translation world)
I wish all success for you on your choice to be translator


OOooww.. Great idea! :matabelo
:2thumbup

Thanks for the suggestions and wish..
peluk
:angel
searchmeggy - 17/06/2011 02:08 PM
#189

Quote:
Original Posted By loc
i'll have to agree with Ambrosiana here \) it could be a simple "Okay, but you'll have to buy me dinner at [insert name of a place here]. Deal?" it's part of educating your friends about your professional status. the payment probably won't be money with close friends, but at least they pay D


Why didn't it cross my mind?
cd

LOL! Good idea. I'll try.

:thumbup
freetofly - 18/06/2011 03:24 AM
#190

ummh, i think i'm kinda interested on this translation job D

i've read the whole thread and still get confuse how to start a career as a translator? bingungs
out of nowhere, would somebody entrust their translation needs on me?
i mean where and how to find the client?
Ambrosiana - 18/06/2011 07:46 AM
#191

Quote:
Original Posted By freetofly
ummh, i think i'm kinda interested on this translation job D

i've read the whole thread and still get confuse how to start a career as a translator? bingungs
out of nowhere, would somebody entrust their translation needs on me?
i mean where and how to find the client?

Ah, I think you miss some parts...
That's why I always say to our friends some good way to begin are:
1.Joining Translation Agency as “in-house translator”
2.Starting to accept translation work from our environment
3.Marketing your service on the Net
4.Sending Application to Publisher
5.Joining Translators Group
Further explanation can be found on the article I put on the first page.

to answer your second question, I can give a description like this:
If you follow the first way, joining translation agency, they would give you some kind of test. If you're able to work on the test, certainly you'll get some projects since people who need translation service would not come into you, but they come to the agency they trusted. Here you can show your skill, and I can promise you step by step, you'll find out how to get a client - maybe you'll have your own client too.
If you follow the second, Starting to accept translation work from our environment, it means you have to make some kind declaration to your environment, your friend, like, "Hey, I would start my career as translator. So you can give me some projects" Certainly your friend - who have known you and your skill - are good place to begin. They used to trust you to work on their project - part of them because of friendship - but it's OK. It's a good place to begin.
The other ways I wrote above are effective when you've already had a kind of portfolios. I mean experiences in translating. If you have just started your career, I think you should prioritize the first and second ways.

For your information, also to encourage you, one of our friend, P3ndoel, have tried to apply some of the tips and last time I met him, he said that his work was running well.
I might have to ask him making some kind of testimony here... like on FJB... Gyahahaha....

Remember, translation is a skill which would develop as time goes by.
Don't force yourself too hard to get many projects. Build your strength first, build your brand - I mean make people trust you that you're the right person for this job. Then you'll find yourself easier to find projects...

I hope you'll be succeed in your choice as translator
Feel free to ask me anything about translation world...
How to start working as translator (tips to enter translation world)
freetofly - 18/06/2011 12:39 PM
#192

Quote:
Original Posted By Ambrosiana

Ah, I think you miss some parts...
That's why I always say to our friends some good way to begin are:
1.Joining Translation Agency as “in-house translator”
2.Starting to accept translation work from our environment
3.Marketing your service on the Net
4.Sending Application to Publisher
5.Joining Translators Group
Further explanation can be found on the article I put on the first page.

to answer your second question, I can give a description like this:
If you follow the first way, joining translation agency, they would give you some kind of test. If you're able to work on the test, certainly you'll get some projects since people who need translation service would not come into you, but they come to the agency they trusted. Here you can show your skill, and I can promise you step by step, you'll find out how to get a client - maybe you'll have your own client too.
If you follow the second, Starting to accept translation work from our environment, it means you have to make some kind declaration to your environment, your friend, like, "Hey, I would start my career as translator. So you can give me some projects" Certainly your friend - who have known you and your skill - are good place to begin. They used to trust you to work on their project - part of them because of friendship - but it's OK. It's a good place to begin.
The other ways I wrote above are effective when you've already had a kind of portfolios. I mean experiences in translating. If you have just started your career, I think you should prioritize the first and second ways.

For your information, also to encourage you, one of our friend, P3ndoel, have tried to apply some of the tips and last time I met him, he said that his work was running well.
I might have to ask him making some kind of testimony here... like on FJB... Gyahahaha....

Remember, translation is a skill which would develop as time goes by.
Don't force yourself too hard to get many projects. Build your strength first, build your brand - I mean make people trust you that you're the right person for this job. Then you'll find yourself easier to find projects...

I hope you'll be succeed in your choice as translator
Feel free to ask me anything about translation world...
How to start working as translator (tips to enter translation world)


well a big thanks for your reply, but one more question, could you give the example of the agency to apply/join?
Ambrosiana - 18/06/2011 01:30 PM
#193

Quote:
Original Posted By freetofly
well a big thanks for your reply, but one more question, could you give the example of the agency to apply/join?


It depends on your city.
There must be at least one in every city.
You can easily find them through google by typing "biro penerjemah", "jasa penerjemah", or "lembaga penerjemah"
in Semarang, there is Citralinguist
in Bandung, there is Penerjemah Mitra
in Jakarta (tons of them), Global
in Yogyakarta, I forgot the name, but Sis englisholic worked on one of them.

There are a lot of other agencies outside what I mentioned. Even what I mentioned are big ones, which means your chance to join is harder than if you choose the smaller one.

Where I can find the smaller one?

See outside your window room. Try to ask people around you, where is agency offered translation service. You can start from there since this kind of agency prefer skill than formal certificate.
Ambrosiana - 19/06/2011 12:05 PM
#194

Recently there are many new translators who asked me about a chance to work with senior translator.
Here I have a vacancy which was posted on Saturday, June 18th 2011 by a senior translator in Bekasi.
The job especially for people in Bekasi region:
Quote:

Currently, I am badly in need of a Junior/Assistant Translator. He/She must hold an S-1(Bachelor's Degree)in English (preferably) or graduates from other disciplines with excellent English, having an age of 25 at the most, preferably domiciled in Bekasi, eager and willing to learn. If you think you are the right person, please send your application along with your resume by indicating your expected salary therein to: Drs. Azali P. Samosir: Centerpoint Apartment Tower A No. 0503 Jl. Achmad Yani Kav. 20 Bekasi 17141 Tel 021-29286104/5 by no later than 1 week from now. Only eligible candidates shall be invited for a test.
Saya juga sangat membutuhkan seorang staf/sekretaris yang mengerti dan dapat mengoperasikan komputer (Power Point, Word & Excel) dengan sangat baik, lulusan D1, atau D3 & lulusan SMA yang memiliki kemampuan berdomisili di Bekasi, umur maksimal 23 tahun, apabila Anda merasa sebagai orang yang tepat, silahkan kirimkan juga lamaran Anda serta Daftar Riwayat Hidup dengan mencantukan gaji yang diinginkan ke alamat tersebut di atas paling lambat 1 minggu dari hari ini.
p3ndo3l - 19/06/2011 02:59 PM
#195

Quote:
Original Posted By Ambrosiana

For your information, also to encourage you, one of our friend, P3ndoel, have tried to apply some of the tips and last time I met him, he said that his work was running well.
I might have to ask him making some kind of testimony here... like on FJB... Gyahahaha....

How to start working as translator (tips to enter translation world)


I knew it...

my senses are tingling for some reason....

Its you talking about me here D

testimony? hummmmm

I think that what was written by ambrosiana here are good tips for beginner like me.
Try applying it with determination, and dont give up on triffles, because there are more obstacles out there in life than just becoming a translator \)
VutoSint - 19/06/2011 10:14 PM
#196

I really want to be a translator, but I think it's not my time now. I'm still improving my abilities
Ambrosiana - 19/06/2011 10:24 PM
#197

Quote:
Original Posted By p3ndo3l

there are more obstacles out there in life than just becoming a translator \)

Gyahahah... Seemed like you have passed a huge struggle in your life...
You can share your story in my thread: Share Your Memorable Moments
Quote:
Original Posted By VutoSint
I really want to be a translator, but I think it's not my time now. I'm still improving my abilities

It's OK.
There's nothing wrong with improving our skill.
Monoxdifly - 20/06/2011 11:13 AM
#198

Btw, Ambro, I wonder why did you recommend BCA for the online translation and not any other bank accounts. I still don't get it. Also, where's the translating job vocation you said yesterday? I can't find it anywhere. Thanks for advance.
Ambrosiana - 20/06/2011 01:58 PM
#199

Quote:
Original Posted By Monoxdifly
Btw, Ambro, I wonder why did you recommend BCA for the online translation and not any other bank accounts. I still don't get it. Also, where's the translating job vocation you said yesterday? I can't find it anywhere. Thanks for advance.


I recommended BCA because it's widely used whether for local and international transaction. BCA Online also much more easier to be used than others.

Iiiiih... You didn't pay attention to the previous posts.
Here:
https://www.kaskus.co.id/showpost.php?p=451924778&postcount=187
https://www.kaskus.co.id/showpost.php?p=453570821&postcount=194
Monoxdifly - 21/06/2011 08:44 AM
#200

Quote:
Original Posted By Ambrosiana


I recommended BCA because it's widely used whether for local and international transaction. BCA Online also much more easier to be used than others.

Iiiiih... You didn't pay attention to the previous posts.
Here:
https://www.kaskus.co.id/showpost.php?p=451924778&postcount=187
https://www.kaskus.co.id/showpost.php?p=453570821&postcount=194


That was actually my point. I still wonder why BCA is considered much more easier to be used than others.

Oh, sorry. But... Jakarta & Bekasi. They're so far away... \(
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