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Ambrosiana - 27/04/2011 02:41 PM
#21

Quote:
Original Posted By FrozenFlame
Almost the same experience with sis p1nk3d,

I have been translating college and educational materials since my univ days before, and I specialize myself in translating Economics/Accounting/Management and Information Technology/Computer Hardware/Software stuffs. Sometimes, I got different tasks including Geology, Literature Excerpts, Written formal speeches, and for the rarest one Music Lyrics, and so on D

Usually I helped my friends with no fee at all, or they usually treat me to lunch/dinner p. But that changed when I graduated from my college.With years experience in my univ days, I am confident as one of trusted translator in my campus p. ( Worked part time as translator @JAC too, translating Management related documents )

And now I still love English Language, one of my main languages now D.

Some Tips from me :



That's all ^^;; Keep it up and God will do the rest \)



Blue Ocean Strategy is a management terms coined by W. Chan Kim and Renée Mauborgne, a Strategy which illustrate A Blue Ocean, ( rather than red ocean where there are bloody mess around competitors ) a highly profitable and growing organization which can be generated by creating new demand in an uncontested market space or a "[COLOR="Blue"]Blue Ocean", than by competing head-to-head with other suppliers for known customers in an existing industry

How to start working as translator (tips to enter translation world)ATTENTION FOR FROZEN FLAME
I want to copy your tips to post below my article... But it can't be done since you quoted it... Please remove the quote and change it into 'code' or no quote... It's too good to let it there...
Quote:
Original Posted By jchristie
Frozen Flame already put the basic understanding of the Blue Ocen Strategy shakehand so I'll try to project what I think applicable if you're a translator.

Fast fact : you are NOT the only translator in the neighborhood and there are always translators that can do the work with less payment compared to you. What would you do? well, how about some ideas:

a. Be a specialist
Like our beloved Sista P1nk3d above, who specialized in translating fictional novels. In fact, go much further into a specific genre of fictional novel. BE REALLY GOOD at it - when your name is synonymous with, let's say - a romantic novel - then you nailed it. Why, because you're not an average translator, you are THE BEST TRANSLATOR for romantic novel.


b. Try another ocean
OK, perhaps you are not confident enough or you would love to learn various sectors as you translate. Why don't you do so in another 'ocean' ? This will mean either you can start your business in other place (the competition is less in Padang compared to Jakarta) or you can start an online translation business, hence expanding your coverage area. You will have other 'ocean' to swim, rather than stay in the already crowded and stiff competition in the red ocean you're in now.

c. Be Different
This could be in your ethics in translating, in your method, in your client management. Do not do as others do - be yourself, be unique! Keep your quality high so people won;t mind paying you extra, because according to them; "That translator is different he always meet the deadline, no hassle, and a great communicator!"

as a wrap, I'll take an example for your previous post about Hipyan Nopri - that's a Blue Ocean Strategy!!! He chooses other ocean called Sumatra and he's being different with his rate which he compensate with quality.

So, how BLUE of a translator are you? metal:

Wow, that's quite great explanation. It's a good tips for me too....[/color]
pm70 - 27/04/2011 03:34 PM
#22

Guys, mind if I join?

It's an interesting topic as I happen to be one of those "translators"; and I've been doing it for ages.

But the first lesson I've ever learned there: Be willing to work for free.
That's pretty rough, I can tell you. It's about - previously mentioned - networking, which means that you have got to earn your reputation, credibility - whatever names you wish to call them - because it will give your "balance inquiry" a significant impact in due time. And as far as my mind could get out of those rigid rates, I boldly offered my knowledge for free at the outset. It wasn't easy. It was horrible! Most clients didn't really get to appreciate such efforts, as they kept on going with their "unlimited complaints" incessantly! Okay. That's fine. That's just about the risk I had to take. It was around 1996-1997. Those days are done.

Today, I often see those "newcomers" with "negotiable in advance" attitude, and I even had a chance to actually work side by side with them. Unfortunately, it didn't really work out that way. When it comes to pricing, well, you're selling what you got, not your rate. The better "recognition" you get, the more "expensive" you will become. Sadly, to my own experience, most "newcomers" tend to adjust their rates first, simply to get the job with hopes that they'll get better clients, better rates, better and better in everything about translation. I don't think so. It's just like any other business I've been doing for years; Be willing to work for free.
It's an advance concept, probably couple of years to digest before we get to realize that's "the ticket". Why?
Simply because "nothing comes for free."

We give the best shot in our business, we get the best result.
And what's far greater than PASSION to give?
It doesn't require formal education, promotions and anything alike.
Your passion in translating - as well as any other business - gives you the unblemished result.
And when you're doing things PASSIONATELY, "Oh, My God!", your success is inevitable.

Love translating and ilovekaskus

Cheers!
Ambrosiana - 27/04/2011 04:17 PM
#23

Quote:
Original Posted By pm70
Guys, mind if I join?

It's an interesting topic as I happen to be one of those "translators"; and I've been doing it for ages.

But the first lesson I've ever learned there: Be willing to work for free.
That's pretty rough, I can tell you. It's about - previously mentioned - networking, which means that you have got to earn your reputation, credibility - whatever names you wish to call them - because it will give your "balance inquiry" a significant impact in due time. And as far as my mind could get out of those rigid rates, I boldly offered my knowledge for free at the outset. It wasn't easy. It was horrible! Most clients didn't really get to appreciate such efforts, as they kept on going with their "unlimited complaints" incessantly! Okay. That's fine. That's just about the risk I had to take. It was around 1996-1997. Those days are done.

Today, I often see those "newcomers" with "negotiable in advance" attitude, and I even had a chance to actually work side by side with them. Unfortunately, it didn't really work out that way. When it comes to pricing, well, you're selling what you got, not your rate. The better "recognition" you get, the more "expensive" you will become. Sadly, to my own experience, most "newcomers" tend to adjust their rates first, simply to get the job with hopes that they'll get better clients, better rates, better and better in everything about translation. I don't think so. It's just like any other business I've been doing for years; Be willing to work for free.
It's an advance concept, probably couple of years to digest before we get to realize that's "the ticket". Why?
Simply because "nothing comes for free."

We give the best shot in our business, we get the best result.
And what's far greater than PASSION to give?
It doesn't require formal education, promotions and anything alike.
Your passion in translating - as well as any other business - gives you the unblemished result.
And when you're doing things PASSIONATELY, "Oh, My God!", your success is inevitable.

Love translating and ilovekaskus

Cheers!

Waw, thanks for the tips. to be honest when I first made this thread, I invited all Kaskus translators I knew for giving tips. I'm sorry that previously I didn't include you since I thought you are a musician (I read your post on Anybody Interested in music?).
I'm really surprised that you actually a translator too.
How to start working as translator (tips to enter translation world)

What you've said is also a good tips, also remind me of my experience, since I once did translation just to buy some food to eat. I will copy it on first page so everyone can read this useful tips from you. Thank you for giving contribution in this thread.
FrozenFlame - 27/04/2011 04:30 PM
#24

Quote:
Original Posted By jchristie

So, how BLUE of a translator are you? metal:


I feel blue right now malu

Quote:
Original Posted By Ambrosiana

How to start working as translator (tips to enter translation world)ATTENTION FOR FROZEN FLAME
I want to copy your tips to post below my article... But it can't be done since you quoted it... Please remove the quote and change it into 'code' or no quote... It's too good to let it there...

Wow, that's quite great explanation. It's a good tips for me too....


Done D

@pm70

Nice to meet you shakehand, as fellow translators and English language lover and fellow musician D
p1nk3d_books - 27/04/2011 04:32 PM
#25

Quote:
Original Posted By Ambrosiana

How to start working as translator (tips to enter translation world)ATTENTION FOR FROZEN FLAME
I want to copy your tips to post below my article... But it can't be done since you quoted it... Please remove the quote and change it into 'code' or no quote... It's too good to let it there...

No, it's from another post, bro. Just click the How to start working as translator (tips to enter translation world) and you'll be redirected to his original post, then you can simply quote it from there. If it's from another thread, just copy all the post, and paste it here in your thread! \)
Quote:
Original Posted By pm70
Guys, mind if I join?

It's an interesting topic as I happen to be one of those "translators"; and I've been doing it for ages.

But the first lesson I've ever learned there: Be willing to work for free.
That's pretty rough, I can tell you. It's about - previously mentioned - networking, which means that you have got to earn your reputation, credibility - whatever names you wish to call them - because it will give your "balance inquiry" a significant impact in due time. And as far as my mind could get out of those rigid rates, I boldly offered my knowledge for free at the outset. It wasn't easy. It was horrible! Most clients didn't really get to appreciate such efforts, as they kept on going with their "unlimited complaints" incessantly! Okay. That's fine. That's just about the risk I had to take. It was around 1996-1997. Those days are done.

Today, I often see those "newcomers" with "negotiable in advance" attitude, and I even had a chance to actually work side by side with them. Unfortunately, it didn't really work out that way. When it comes to pricing, well, you're selling what you got, not your rate. The better "recognition" you get, the more "expensive" you will become. Sadly, to my own experience, most "newcomers" tend to adjust their rates first, simply to get the job with hopes that they'll get better clients, better rates, better and better in everything about translation. I don't think so. It's just like any other business I've been doing for years; Be willing to work for free.
It's an advance concept, probably couple of years to digest before we get to realize that's "the ticket". Why?
Simply because "nothing comes for free."

We give the best shot in our business, we get the best result.
And what's far greater than PASSION to give?
It doesn't require formal education, promotions and anything alike.
Your passion in translating - as well as any other business - gives you the unblemished result.
And when you're doing things PASSIONATELY, "Oh, My God!", your success is inevitable.

Love translating and ilovekaskus

Cheers!

Gosh, this is what exactly happened to me. When I joined Kaskus back in 2009, I have nothing to expect. I only want to have some fun and when I found the English Forum, I thought, hell why didn't I put my English skill to use? I was pursuing an English degree at that time. That way, my English wouldn't be rusty and I'd learn from explaining to others too (since I have to understand the material first in order to explain it to the asker). And it turned out good. Even when my final Comprehension Exam was coming, I could still practice my Grammar understanding here \)

This also goes the same with my translation skill. Since I think I am good at translation, I started to help people in 'Permintaan Bantuan Terjemahan' thread. I started to learn more idioms, more new terms, new slangs. And hell, I was so diligent like Ambrosiana back then. Just ask, and I shall do it ngakaks. Lengthy paragraphs, abstract for thesis, etc. But now, since more people turned up and I am busy with life, I choose the simpler and shorther one (I know, bad of me! ngakaks) just to keep up with you guys! Peace:

Hell, I started to love this thread! It's way better than the Translator's Guild since many new people turn up and share!
Quote:
Original Posted By FrozenFlame
@pm70

Nice to meet you shakehand, as fellow translators and English language lover and fellow musician D

Ah u iki sembarang nge-klaim suka, mod shutup:
English iya, musik iya, manga iya, teknologi iya, sesuk opo maneh.

ngakak


So sorry to use Javanese, guys! :ketawaampekeluarairmata
jchristie - 27/04/2011 06:00 PM
#26

Afternoon people....

I can't get rid of these thoughts I had since starting to be 'actively' involved in this thread: Will your academic background matters if you are working as a translator?

I will say NO - even if I graduated from English Letters department. IMHO, having a sound academic background will surely helps but that should not be the only thing that a translator should be measured from. In fact, I STRONGLY DISAGREE when people said that one translator is better than the other because he/ she graduated from English Department in the University.

WHY? Because we all learned English somewhere down our academic years. In my days, I received English Lesson in Junior High. Nowadays, kids learned English as early as 3rd grade? My daughter was admitted into a toddler where she picked up names of fruits, colors, numbers (1-9) and Mum/Dad when she was 4 years old!

My point is, your experience and exposure to English count more! No offense, you might be a junior high school drop out but that does not make you worth less than those who learned English in the Academy. You might learned English through courses and you still can deliver good translation!

Translation is a form of art, where you use your words carefully to ensure that the meaning will remain in the same context. I usually ask about the reader of my translation to determine the diction. You need EXPERIENCE forged from hours of translating to make a bad into better, better to good, and eventually into a GREAT TRANSLATOR.

Don't be 'minder' if you feel you don't have the proper English background, substitute that with experience. It is PRICELESS and it is a great leverage in your career as a translator. I have three last suggestions for you; 1) Practice your translation skill 2) Practice it regularly 3) Practice on different terrain....

just my 2 cents...
jeben - 27/04/2011 06:27 PM
#27

^^^
i'm not in an english department of some uni. truthfully, i'm quite confident with my english skills, although i have no idea about how tenses and grammars work, at all. i had great experience in english, had. well, at least i know what's right and wrong.

i'd love to be a (paid) translator. only looking for the experience. so far, i've never been paid doing any of them, because all that i've ever translated are my friend's.
i'm still believing that credentials are your tickets to the world of translators. \(
Ambrosiana - 27/04/2011 08:24 PM
#28

Quote:
Original Posted By FrozenFlame

Done D

@pm70

Nice to meet you shakehand, as fellow translators and English language lover and fellow musician D

Thank you Bro FrozenFlame... Haha... Seeing you this night remind me that I have to take the latest episod of Nodame Cantabile that published today. I ordered one....How to start working as translator (tips to enter translation world)
[COLOR="White"]Soale ngeliat FrozenFlame langsung inget Manga...
Quote:
Original Posted By p1nk3d_books
No, it's from another post, bro. Just click the How to start working as translator (tips to enter translation world) and you'll be redirected to his original post, then you can simply quote it from there. If it's from another thread, just copy all the post, and paste it here in your thread! \)

There was something he added. The number 5. I've checked it. If there was no addition, certainly I will copy it directly from the source.... It's true... Ask FrozenFlame... How to start working as translator (tips to enter translation world)
Not my fault Sis...
Quote:
Original Posted By p1nk3d_books

Gosh, this is what exactly happened to me. When I joined Kaskus back in 2009, I have nothing to expect. I only want to have some fun and when I found the English Forum, I thought, hell why didn't I put my English skill to use? I was pursuing an English degree at that time. That way, my English wouldn't be rusty and I'd learn from explaining to others too (since I have to understand the material first in order to explain it to the asker). And it turned out good. Even when my final Comprehension Exam was coming, I could still practice my Grammar understanding here \)

This also goes the same with my translation skill. Since I think I am good at translation, I started to help people in 'Permintaan Bantuan Terjemahan' thread. I started to learn more idioms, more new terms, new slangs. And hell, I was so diligent like Ambrosiana back then. Just ask, and I shall do it ngakaks. Lengthy paragraphs, abstract for thesis, etc. But now, since more people turned up and I am busy with life, I choose the simpler and shorther one (I know, bad of me! ngakaks) just to keep up with you guys! Peace:

I'll truly take it as compliment. Your words really flattered me...How to start working as translator (tips to enter translation world)
Dipuji Sis P1nk gitu loh... Gak semua orang dapet loh...

Quote:
Original Posted By jchristie
Afternoon people....

I can't get rid of these thoughts I had since starting to be 'actively' involved in this thread: Will your academic background matters if you are working as a translator?

I will say NO - even if I graduated from English Letters department. IMHO, having a sound academic background will surely helps but that should not be the only thing that a translator should be measured from. In fact, I STRONGLY DISAGREE when people said that one translator is better than the other because he/ she graduated from English Department in the University.

WHY? Because we all learned English somewhere down our academic years. In my days, I received English Lesson in Junior High. Nowadays, kids learned English as early as 3rd grade? My daughter was admitted into a toddler where she picked up names of fruits, colors, numbers (1-9) and Mum/Dad when she was 4 years old!

My point is, your experience and exposure to English count more! No offense, you might be a junior high school drop out but that does not make you worth less than those who learned English in the Academy. You might learned English through courses and you still can deliver good translation!

Translation is a form of art, where you use your words carefully to ensure that the meaning will remain in the same context. I usually ask about the reader of my translation to determine the diction. You need EXPERIENCE forged from hours of translating to make a bad into better, better to good, and eventually into a GREAT TRANSLATOR.

Don't be 'minder' if you feel you don't have the proper English background, substitute that with experience. It is PRICELESS and it is a great leverage in your career as a translator. I have three last suggestions for you; 1) Practice your translation skill 2) Practice it regularly 3) Practice on different terrain....

just my 2 cents...

Well, That's true... Especially:
Quote:

You need EXPERIENCE forged from hours of translating to make a bad into better, better to good, and eventually into a GREAT TRANSLATOR.

Maybe some of you have heard about Sofia Mansoor. She is Honorary Member of HPI, founder of Bahtera... and (as I often gossip you) some said she's the highest paid translator and interpreter in Indonesia. In fact, she's actively asked terms in Bahtera Milis, asked other people's opinion about translation case, which proved that translation is like neverending learning... I can mention you some "Masters" who also did the same... Tim Behrend (the leader of Translator Association in Aussie), Katsujiro Ueno (translator from Japan, leader of Japan-Indonesia Culture Relations Institution), Ivan Lanin (Localizer of Wikipedia Indonesia), Rahmani Astuti (Mizan's translator who has translated hundreds of novels and books).... All of these people still have spirit to learn... (You can meet them in Bahtera Milis to prove my words)
If they, who are the best among others, are still learning... I think so we should too...
Quote:
Original Posted By jeben
^^^
i'm not in an english department of some uni. truthfully, i'm quite confident with my english skills, although i have no idea about how tenses and grammars work, at all. i had great experience in english, had. well, at least i know what's right and wrong.

i'd love to be a (paid) translator. only looking for the experience. so far, i've never been paid doing any of them, because all that i've ever translated are my friend's.
i'm still believing that credentials are your tickets to the world of translators. \(

As I said before, you have the skill Jeben. True!...
Well, as on the tips, you can start as apprentice in an experienced translator, or being in-house translator, so you can find the line... I mean some kind of key to open the gate in translation world.
If you want to start as freelance, you should respect your skill. Let your friends pay you, although cheaper than common rate...[/COLOR]
pm70 - 28/04/2011 12:37 AM
#29

Quote:
Original Posted By FrozenFlame
I feel blue right now malu



Done D

@pm70

Nice to meet you shakehand, as fellow translators and English language lover and fellow musician D


Please to meet you, FrozenFlame shakehand2
Cheers!ilovekaskus
jchristie - 28/04/2011 03:45 PM
#30
How much should I charge?
Quote:
Original Posted By Ambrosiana

....If you want to start as freelance, you should respect your skill. Let your friends pay you, although cheaper than common rate...[/COLOR][/SIZE][/FONT]


I could not agree more with the above advise, if you have skill in translation - you should honor that. Getting paid (no matter how little) is one of them. Of course you can say," Ah, itung-itung bantu temen..." sometimes but when your so called friend come with 10 pages of translation material, I do hope you honor yourself by stating some fee.
Hey, if he/ she is really your friend, I bet the fee won't be a problem and in the end of day getting paid for what you did will not change the fact that you HELPED your friend anyway.

beer:
Ambrosiana - 29/04/2011 08:04 AM
#31

Quote:
Original Posted By jchristie
I could not agree more with the above advise, if you have skill in translation - you should honor that. Getting paid (no matter how little) is one of them. Of course you can say," Ah, itung-itung bantu temen..." sometimes but when your so called friend come with 10 pages of translation material, I do hope you honor yourself by stating some fee.
Hey, if he/ she is really your friend, I bet the fee won't be a problem and in the end of day getting paid for what you did will not change the fact that you HELPED your friend anyway.

beer:

It's true... in my case, even some of my friend, who use my service in my early career force me to give some contribution for my efforts to help them... If I refuse the money, they started to bring some kind of "daily needs" such as bread, chocolate, cookies... which its amount higher than the translation price itself... So I finally charge them money since not all the "daily needs" they've brought useful for me...
danuidiot75 - 29/04/2011 09:50 AM
#32

i think, it's so good and easy to be a translator since i read this thread D now, i want to make a translator group with my friends. do you think it is a good idea ? i'm sorry if my English bad malu:How to start working as translator (tips to enter translation world)
jchristie - 29/04/2011 05:25 PM
#33
negotiating your translation fee (take & give)
OK, when you are given translation job perhaps you still feel that your fee is still too low. Yet, you accept it for various reason. Well, lemme share what I do to negotiate my translation fee with several scenarios:

a. You want higher fee
What you can say is that; 1) you will meet the deadline, especially with tight deadline you should always negotiate your fee 2) You will ensure a good quality translation 3) Give the user chances to review and revise your translation work (I give 2 times to revise with close attention to the things asked to be revised).

b. The fee is low but you still want (or need) to take it anyway
In this case you can ask for longer time to finish the translation. You compensate longer translation time without sacrificing the quality of your translation - NEVER compensate the quality of your translation!

c. Identify other traits of the translation job
Simple example would be: will there be any future translation job for you or will it be a one-time job? I work with a translation bureau with fair fee but they keep the job flowing.

REAL LIFE example from me:
I have negotiated my fee with the translation bureau. Why? because I always delivered the job way ahead the agreed time and with good quality. I rarely complain if I should redo any job based on the user review (as long as it is making sense). Thus, I'd rather say 'NO' if I think the deadline is too tight.
I'm waiting for a contract for a 3 days work as an Interpreter. The fee is low, around 500k/ day. In return, I have all the accommodation (lodging, meals, transport) covered during the event in an island resort near Padang City. Also, a new network with this organization and (possible) additional translation work. Hmm, I'm taking a leave to a resort island for 3 nights and yet I earned money in the process - now, that's a deal!

beer:
Ambrosiana - 30/04/2011 07:33 AM
#34

Quote:
Original Posted By danuidiot75
i think, it's so good and easy to be a translator since i read this thread D now, i want to make a translator group with my friends. do you think it is a good idea ? i'm sorry if my English bad malu:How to start working as translator (tips to enter translation world)

Hey, that's good idea Danu. Make sure that your translation group has some kind of Editor to recheck all others work. I'm really glad if this thread is useful for you. You may PM/VM me to ask anything related with translation world, and I will try to give my best answer for you.How to start working as translator (tips to enter translation world)
Quote:
Original Posted By jchristie
OK, when you are given translation job perhaps you still feel that your fee is still too low. Yet, you accept it for various reason. Well, lemme share what I do to negotiate my translation fee with several scenarios:

a. You want higher fee
What you can say is that; [COLOR="Blue"]1) you will meet the deadline, especially with tight deadline you should always negotiate your fee 2) You will ensure a good quality translation 3) Give the user chances to review and revise your translation work (I give 2 times to revise with close attention to the things asked to be revised).

b. The fee is low but you still want (or need) to take it anyway
In this case you can ask for longer time to finish the translation. You compensate longer translation time without sacrificing the quality of your translation - NEVER compensate the quality of your translation!

c. Identify other traits of the translation job
Simple example would be: will there be any future translation job for you or will it be a one-time job? I work with a translation bureau with fair fee but they keep the job flowing.

REAL LIFE example from me:
I have negotiated my fee with the translation bureau. Why? because I always delivered the job way ahead the agreed time and with good quality. I rarely complain if I should redo any job based on the user review (as long as it is making sense). Thus, I'd rather say 'NO' if I think the deadline is too tight.
I'm waiting for a contract for a 3 days work as an Interpreter. The fee is low, around 500k/ day. In return, I have all the accommodation (lodging, meals, transport) covered during the event in an island resort near Padang City. Also, a new network with this organization and (possible) additional translation work. Hmm, I'm taking a leave to a resort island for 3 nights and yet I earned money in the process - now, that's a deal!

beer:

Additional tips from jchirstie about negotiating your rate
beer:[/color]
jchristie - 30/04/2011 12:40 PM
#35
translation format
Relate to the above title, what format you can use for your translation job? The answer may vary, either based on your preferences or your customer's. Here's my translation format for an example:

Font Type/ Size : Calibri/ 11
Alternative : Times New Roman/ 12

Margins : Moderate (on MS Word 97)
Alternative : Left-Right; 4cm, Top-Bottom; 3cm

Spacing : 1.5 OR 2
Paper Size : A4

This formatting will have a HUGE impact to your translation fee, if you charged by the number of finished/ translated page. So, determine which format you are comfortable with. Thus, state this format clearly to your client.

Fellow translators, please add/ share your thoughts on this.... beer:
loc - 30/04/2011 08:16 PM
#36

one thing we should keep in mind: we don't simply translate from one language to another. we translate the culture, too. maybe an illustration will help:

Bahasa Indonesia:
A: Eh, tumben kamu di sini.. Janjian ketemu sama orang?
B: Ngga, iseng aja. Udah lama ngga ke sini.

English:
A: Hi! I didn't expect to see you here. Meeting someone?
B: Nope. Just thought I'd come here. Been a long time.

now, how would you translate the indonesian word "tumben"? what about "iseng"? you don't. you just look at the whole exchange and find expressions that best convey 1) the meaning; 2) the level of formality/the context; and 3) the natural way of expressing points 1) and 2) above in both languages.

and as if that's not complicated enough, if, say, we know from the context in the original text that A and B are ex-lovers, the setting is in a place where they used to spend hours just being with each other, and therefore the meeting above is an awkward one, then the lines that follow the openers above should reflect that awkwardness, NATURALLY, in the target language.

as translators, the last thing we want is for the message to be "lost in translation", right? D

as far as formatting is concerned, I don't usually change the format of the text if it comes as a soft copy. i just charge more if the original text is really dense.
Ambrosiana - 30/04/2011 08:45 PM
#37

Quote:
Original Posted By loc
one thing we should keep in mind: we don't simply translate from one language to another. we translate the culture, too. maybe an illustration will help:

Bahasa Indonesia:
A: Eh, tumben kamu di sini.. Janjian ketemu sama orang?
B: Ngga, iseng aja. Udah lama ngga ke sini.

English:
A: Hi! I didn't expect to see you here. Meeting someone?
B: Nope. Just thought I'd come here. Been a long time.

now, how would you translate the indonesian word "tumben"? what about "iseng"? you don't. you just look at the whole exchange and find expressions that best convey 1) the meaning; 2) the level of formality/the context; and 3) the natural way of expressing points 1) and 2) above in both languages.

and as if that's not complicated enough, if, say, we know from the context in the original text that A and B are ex-lovers, the setting is in a place where they used to spend hours just being with each other, and therefore the meeting above is an awkward one, then the lines that follow the openers above should reflect that awkwardness, NATURALLY, in the target language.

as translators, the last thing we want is for the message to be "lost in translation", right? D

as far as formatting is concerned, I don't usually change the format of the text if it comes as a soft copy. i just charge more if the original text is really dense.

:selamat
Finally we have Loc here!....
Man, I really proud that I can gather the best translators here...
Thank you for your tips, Loc... I'm sure it really extend our insight about translation world
p1nk3d_books - 01/05/2011 12:26 AM
#38

Quote:
Original Posted By jchristie
OK, when you are given translation job perhaps you still feel that your fee is still too low. Yet, you accept it for various reason. Well, lemme share what I do to negotiate my translation fee with several scenarios:

a. You want higher fee
What you can say is that; 1) you will meet the deadline, especially with tight deadline you should always negotiate your fee 2) You will ensure a good quality translation 3) Give the user chances to review and revise your translation work (I give 2 times to revise with close attention to the things asked to be revised).

b. The fee is low but you still want (or need) to take it anyway
In this case you can ask for longer time to finish the translation. You compensate longer translation time without sacrificing the quality of your translation - NEVER compensate the quality of your translation!

c. Identify other traits of the translation job
Simple example would be: will there be any future translation job for you or will it be a one-time job? I work with a translation bureau with fair fee but they keep the job flowing.

REAL LIFE example from me:
I have negotiated my fee with the translation bureau. Why? because I always delivered the job way ahead the agreed time and with good quality. I rarely complain if I should redo any job based on the user review (as long as it is making sense). Thus, I'd rather say 'NO' if I think the deadline is too tight.
I'm waiting for a contract for a 3 days work as an Interpreter. The fee is low, around 500k/ day. In return, I have all the accommodation (lodging, meals, transport) covered during the event in an island resort near Padang City. Also, a new network with this organization and (possible) additional translation work. Hmm, I'm taking a leave to a resort island for 3 nights and yet I earned money in the process - now, that's a deal!

beer:

Gosh, this is what I've just done recently \( You made me 'kepikiran' \(
But they said can I give them kinder price for them since this is the first time we work together so I guess it's okay...
Quote:
Original Posted By jchristie
Relate to the above title, what format you can use for your translation job? The answer may vary, either based on your preferences or your customer's. Here's my translation format for an example:

Font Type/ Size : Calibri/ 11
Alternative : Times New Roman/ 12

Margins : Moderate (on MS Word 97)
Alternative : Left-Right; 4cm, Top-Bottom; 3cm

Spacing : 1.5 OR 2
Paper Size : A4

This formatting will have a HUGE impact to your translation fee, if you charged by the number of finished/ translated page. So, determine which format you are comfortable with. Thus, state this format clearly to your client.

Fellow translators, please add/ share your thoughts on this.... beer:

Me, I'm a bit quirky person p I have to type in the correct font in order to build my mood. Bad font, bad mood = no motive to do translation. TNR is a big no for me, I view the font as a very rigid font and has no personality. I usually type in Verdana, recently I type in Calibri but I got bored and now I'm trying Maiandra p
jchristie - 01/05/2011 10:49 AM
#39

@ loc - TRUE, in addition to context, translation will be harder if U have the cultural components/ local idioms into it.

@ p1nk3d - geez, I do hate TNR unless the customer wants it. But, having a font type affecting your mood? wow, Sista...btw, what did you do recently that make you 'kepikiran'? if you don't mind sharing...

Next : WILL YOU CHARGE DIFFERENTLY for English - Bahasa and Bahasa - English translation?
I think, I should charge MORE for Bahasa to English translation. The logic is because I see Bahasa is 'richer' in terms of vocab, it has no tense, no gender (he/ she), making translation from English is easier.

Share your thought, pleaseee.... beer:

ps: hope you all don't mind this 'non-pure' and on-occasion translator learn from this thread as well.
p1nk3d_books - 01/05/2011 12:47 PM
#40

Quote:
Original Posted By jchristie
@ p1nk3d - geez, I do hate TNR unless the customer wants it. But, having a font type affecting your mood? wow, Sista...btw, what did you do recently that make you 'kepikiran'? if you don't mind sharing...

Next : WILL YOU CHARGE DIFFERENTLY for English - Bahasa and Bahasa - English translation?
I think, I should charge MORE for Bahasa to English translation. The logic is because I see Bahasa is 'richer' in terms of vocab, it has no tense, no gender (he/ she), making translation from English is easier.

Share your thought, pleaseee.... beer:

ps: hope you all don't mind this 'non-pure' and on-occasion translator learn from this thread as well.

Yes, I am that weird hammer:
But afterwards, when the deadline comes, I will change all the font into TNR since that's the requirement.

Yg buat kepikiran: about the 'don't negotiate your rate' thing. I got an offer from a publisher. They have stated their rate (which I think was appropriate for newbies but not for translators like me, who have at least translated 5 books) and asked for my rate. So I gave them my rate. They said it was understandable but can I give them kinder rate since this is the first time we work together? (harga perkenalan -- as they call it p) So I decided to lower my rate a bit, since I was afraid I would lose the deal \( What do you think of this?

Yees, translating Bahasa to English is much harder \( \( \( I did it once, translating a children storybook and phew, it was hard. I realize that's not my expertise. Even when translating thesis' abstract or letters here in Kaskus, I do find it hard.
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