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deVilos - 02/11/2011 11:52 PM
#401

Quote:
Original Posted By Ambrosiana

Hlah... that's one of the reasons why we should have specification on certain field. The more we master specific field (engineering, oil & gas, psychology, etc) - it would help us to minimize the competition and also raise our salary.

FYI, many advanced translators I know, taking specific field only (OK, I have to say that I'm not on that level yet)

After following workshop held on last Saturday, I found that being a translator in specific field is quite promising from financial perspective. (I already know it, but I've just met some people whose financial income is unimaginable for me before)

I meet Mrs. Ana Wiksmadhara who works for Oil & Gas Company and she used to take translation project about Oil & Gas only. Her salary from the company is about IDR 40 million a month (not included her 'side job')

I also meet translator from Pasuruan, Ahnan Alex who hold record for 'highest-paid' for one project - he once received IDR 60 million from one project (which he found from ProZ)

I'm really really far away from them :mewek :mewek


Looks like the professionals are most fluent translating over their daily works. Its quite make sense. D
Baterism - 04/11/2011 07:12 AM
#402

To dear fellow translators

I have something to ask regarding to applying for translation job.

Which language do you use when sending application letter particularly for local client? Indonesian or English?

Regards.
Ambrosiana - 05/11/2011 09:29 AM
#403

Quote:
Original Posted By Baterism
To dear fellow translators

I have something to ask regarding to applying for translation job.

Which language do you use when sending application letter particularly for local client? Indonesian or English?

Regards.

For local client, surely Bahasa Indonesia. D
I send my previous cover letter and CV to Gramedia using Bahasa Indonesia ;) [COLOR="White"]and I received a project from them
However, make sure you put your long long translating / interpreting experiences on CV D
Longer is better hammer:[/COLOR]
Baterism - 05/11/2011 06:06 PM
#404

Quote:
Original Posted By Ambrosiana

For local client, surely Bahasa Indonesia. D
I send my previous cover letter and CV to Gramedia using Bahasa Indonesia ;) [COLOR="White"]and I received a project from them
However, make sure you put your long long translating / interpreting experiences on CV D
Longer is better hammer:[/COLOR]


Thanks for the answer bro. That's an insight for me. I've always use English to contact potential clients, but nobody responses. I'm fully aware that my experience is still very limited, but if I couldn't get more jobs how can I get experience. Next time I send application, I will remember to use Indonesian.

Thanks!iloveindonesias
p1nk3d_books - 05/11/2011 06:48 PM
#405

Quote:
Original Posted By Ambrosiana

Hlah... that's one of the reasons why we should have specification on certain field. The more we master specific field (engineering, oil & gas, psychology, etc) - it would help us to minimize the competition and also raise our salary.

FYI, many advanced translators I know, taking specific field only (OK, I have to say that I'm not on that level yet)

After following workshop held on last Saturday, I found that being a translator in specific field is quite promising from financial perspective. (I already know it, but I've just met some people whose financial income is unimaginable for me before)

I meet Mrs. Ana Wiksmadhara who works for Oil & Gas Company and she used to take translation project about Oil & Gas only. Her salary from the company is about IDR 40 million a month (not included her 'side job')

I also meet translator from Pasuruan, Ahnan Alex who hold record for 'highest-paid' for one project - he once received IDR 60 million from one project (which he found from ProZ)

I'm really really far away from them :mewek :mewek

Wah berarti tu sis mu99le punya potensi yah untuk bisa jadi kayak di atas matabelo:
No wonder she succeeded in doing the sworn translator test
Quote:
Original Posted By Ambrosiana

For local client, surely Bahasa Indonesia. D
I send my previous cover letter and CV to Gramedia using Bahasa Indonesia ;) [COLOR="White"]and I received a project from them
However, make sure you put your long long translating / interpreting experiences on CV D
Longer is better hammer:[/COLOR]

Loh mine was in English p
I thought if we show them that our English is quite good, then they'll believe that we can understand the book they'll give.
Just my two cents D
Ambrosiana - 05/11/2011 09:45 PM
#406

Quote:
Original Posted By Baterism
Thanks for the answer bro. That's an insight for me. I've always use English to contact potential clients, but nobody responses. I'm fully aware that my experience is still very limited, but if I couldn't get more jobs how can I get experience. Next time I send application, I will remember to use Indonesian.

Thanks!iloveindonesias


Quote:
Original Posted By p1nk3d_books
Wah berarti tu sis mu99le punya potensi yah untuk bisa jadi kayak di atas matabelo:
No wonder she succeeded in doing the sworn translator test

Loh mine was in English p
I thought if we show them that our English is quite good, then they'll believe that we can understand the book they'll give.
Just my two cents D

Hmm, that's a good consideration too...

However, this matter once was discussed in Bahtera Milis.
They said that one benefit using Bahasa Indonesia for local client is, our client-candidate could understand our cover letter clearly (because not all clients are able to use English well to determine our skill in English), the client-candidate also felt 'closeness' because of using the same language, so he/she wouldn't hesitate to open an offer/bargain for our rate. D

I think it makes sense. That's why I like to send an offer to local client using Bahasa Indonesia. I've received some projects from Bahtera Milis by that tips... but honestly, that's also because my rate is lower hammer:
ryanryan44 - 05/11/2011 10:12 PM
#407

Quote:
Original Posted By therealagashi
Do you know how to do subtitle? Perhaps you could teach me D


I'm just a beginner, sometimes I don't really know how to use the right words in Indonesian when I translate something.
burnedbruno - 06/11/2011 02:12 PM
#408

Hi everybody. Been lurking in this thread for a while, but couldn’t summon the courage to join in. Gosh, reading the posts and following the conversations here makes me feels like…standing among giants matabelo:, since I’m quite new in this translating world.o Hope I can learn new things, hone my skill, and expand my knowledge in this thread.

Quote:
Original Posted By Baterism
To dear fellow translators

I have something to ask regarding to applying for translation job.

Which language do you use when sending application letter particularly for local client? Indonesian or English?

Regards.


Just wanna share my (limited:nohope\) experience with some local publishers.

Once, since I tried to offer my own translation project (I happened to have a book that had not been translated into Indonesian), I sent my application and proposal in Indonesian and some pages of my translation of that book. Luckily, they agreed to publish that book.D

Another experience. I sent my application for translator position at another publisher. I sent the application and CV in Indonesian (since there was no explicit requirement to make it in English). Then they gave me 3 pages of English text to translate as a test. And, luckily, I got the job.D
ruderude - 06/11/2011 10:10 PM
#409

wow...so many tips from expert here.. D
its time for me to apply it.. How to start working as translator (tips to enter translation world)
Ambrosiana - 07/11/2011 10:18 AM
#410

Quote:
Original Posted By burnedbruno
Hi everybody. Been lurking in this thread for a while, but couldn’t summon the courage to join in. Gosh, reading the posts and following the conversations here makes me feels like…standing among giants matabelo:, since I’m quite new in this translating world.o Hope I can learn new things, hone my skill, and expand my knowledge in this thread.


Just wanna share my (limited:nohope\) experience with some local publishers.

Once, since I tried to offer my own translation project (I happened to have a book that had not been translated into Indonesian), I sent my application and proposal in Indonesian and some pages of my translation of that book. Luckily, they agreed to publish that book.D

Another experience. I sent my application for translator position at another publisher. I sent the application and CV in Indonesian (since there was no explicit requirement to make it in English). Then they gave me 3 pages of English text to translate as a test. And, luckily, I got the job.D

Waw... That's great Bruno...
Keep on the good works!... :thumbup

I also belief that it would be good to use Bahasa Indonesia for local client D
Quote:
Original Posted By ruderude
wow...so many tips from expert here.. D
its time for me to apply it.. How to start working as translator (tips to enter translation world)

I wish you luck, Rude...
Start from your own neighborhood would be great... D
HE.nyitnyit.net - 08/11/2011 09:09 AM
#411

most translator i know were changing from freelance translator to fulltime translator, because this profession has a bright future (better income).

anyway, i want to share my felling..
i was translating handbook manual for japanese trains, than japanese government gave to Indonesian. the train itself already in Indo, and the manual translations contains thousands of word are already finished and sent. and yet, the client pay by half only, and always had an excuse everytime i ask him... sucks...
He did pay, but not full.... pay a small amount every month..
(the money were corrupted? so he pay everytime he had monthly salary?? ...--a)
Silent613 - 08/11/2011 05:38 PM
#412

Hi people,
Kudos to the thread starter and everyone else who has contributed tips on being a translator. Back in college I used to translate documents and thesis reports for friends, sometimes charging them and sometimes doing it for free. I would now like to start translating again and take my services to a professional level and start charging at a proper and reasonable rate. So glad I managed to find this useful thread. cheers everyone cendols
Ambrosiana - 09/11/2011 12:44 PM
#413

Quote:
Original Posted By HE.nyitnyit.net
most translator i know were changing from freelance translator to fulltime translator, because this profession has a bright future (better income).

anyway, i want to share my felling..
i was translating handbook manual for japanese trains, than japanese government gave to Indonesian. the train itself already in Indo, and the manual translations contains thousands of word are already finished and sent. and yet, the client pay by half only, and always had an excuse everytime i ask him... sucks...
He did pay, but not full.... pay a small amount every month..
(the money were corrupted? so he pay everytime he had monthly salary?? ...--a)

The similar case once happened on one of HPI member.
The agency / person was put on blacklist then.
HPI also send official Protest letter to the agency. If you loved to, I can help you to bring this case up. \)
or you can announce the chronology in Bahtera Milis. I'm sure many advanced translators would help you there to give a pressure to the agency / person D
It's too bad to receive such treatment by client berdukas

Quote:
Original Posted By Silent613
[COLOR="Blue"][FONT="Century Gothic"]Hi people,
Kudos to the thread starter and everyone else who has contributed tips on being a translator. Back in college I used to translate documents and thesis reports for friends, sometimes charging them and sometimes doing it for free. I would now like to start translating again and take my services to a professional level and start charging at a proper and reasonable rate. So glad I managed to find this useful thread. cheers everyone cendols

Thank you Silent malu:
Feel free to contact me if you need anything...

Translators should help each other D


Btw, I was laughing hard reading your editing reason ngakaks ngakaks
Feel free to ask the same question over and over... I don't mind.
Surely I also will repeat the same answers hammer: but I have no hard feeling about it. True!
So don't hesitate to ask about anything D

[/FONT][/COLOR]
deVilos - 09/11/2011 01:54 PM
#414

what is HPI means?
Ambrosiana - 09/11/2011 03:27 PM
#415

Quote:
Original Posted By deVilos
what is HPI means?

Himpunan Penerjemah Indonesia (Association of Indonesian Translators)
It's an official organization for translators and interpreters in Indonesia. HPI is member of FIT/IFT (International Federation of Translators) and already followed FIT congress in Wina (1984), Beograd (1990), Brighton (1993), Melbourne (1996), and Beijing (2004). So, it already has acknowledgement National and International... D

Complete information about HPI can be found in www.hpi.or.id D
yiling - 14/11/2011 01:32 AM
#416

Quote:
Original Posted By Ambrosiana

Himpunan Penerjemah Indonesia (Association of Indonesian Translators)
It's an official organization for translators and interpreters in Indonesia. HPI is member of FIT/IFT (International Federation of Translators) and already followed FIT congress in Wina (1984), Beograd (1990), Brighton (1993), Melbourne (1996), and Beijing (2004). So, it already has acknowledgement National and International... D

Complete information about HPI can be found in www.hpi.or.id D


Who may join HPI? Are the sworn translators only or is it open for public?
Thx for answering
Ambrosiana - 14/11/2011 09:18 AM
#417

Quote:
Original Posted By yiling
Who may join HPI? Are the sworn translators only or is it open for public?
Thx for answering

Every translators may join D
There are some requirements you have to fulfill.

You have to send the application form with the example of your translation works (in files through email) also some certificates, etc which support your status as translator.
Then the organization would decide whether you may join or not.
I think you have so many experiences, so it will be good to join, Sis.

There's a membership cost IDR 200.000 which paid annually.

Some of the advantages are:
* You will get information given by HPI related with training, certification, workshop held by HPI.
* You will get information about some translation projects
* The membership will make people sure about your capability as translator or interpreter. Some interpreters there said, they just have to show HPI membership card in some institutions to assure them about their capabilities (such as Police office and Court - when there was case involved foreign citizen)
* The institution would support you to get law protection if there's a case where your client avoided to pay your service
* You can get along with top translators and interpreters, which will give you more insight and knowledge related with translation world

For further explanation, please send email to contact list on www.hpi.or.id
ilsudahsembuh - 14/11/2011 10:13 AM
#418

Morning friends \)

I just need help \(

For anyone who knows about Nida teory about cultural term. Please share

some information to me, because i really can't find some info about that,

i just got theory from Peter Newmark,and thats not enough for my supervisor \(
I still need about Nida's theory

Thanks in advance \)
FrozenFlame - 16/11/2011 02:04 PM
#419

Quote:
Original Posted By HE.nyitnyit.net
most translator i know were changing from freelance translator to fulltime translator, because this profession has a bright future (better income).

anyway, i want to share my felling..
i was translating handbook manual for japanese trains, than japanese government gave to Indonesian. the train itself already in Indo, and the manual translations contains thousands of word are already finished and sent. and yet, the client pay by half only, and always had an excuse everytime i ask him... sucks...
He did pay, but not full.... pay a small amount every month..
(the money were corrupted? so he pay everytime he had monthly salary?? ...--a)


Are you using Japanese-English Google Translation Tool ? p lol D

I think translators are always in high-demand, especially popular and widely used languages ( specifically Business ) and some niche market language.

Well, I understand your point though.

I have met some Japanese Clients ( a native one ), and they're usually adhered to rules and customs ( He's always on time ).The ones who usually miss the deadline are local client ( native Indonesian ) hammer: hammer: [ not all of them though ]

My tips for you :

Always ask for down payment or initial payment when make transaction with clients and make a clear and detailed statement about:

1.When will he/she/they pay the full fare ?
2.How much will he/she/they pay per contract/terms/charge ?
therealagashi - 16/11/2011 07:17 PM
#420

Quote:
Original Posted By FrozenFlame

1.When will he/she/they pay(s) the full fare ?
2.How much will he/she/they pay(s) per contract/terms/charge ?


There's no need for (s) if you're asking with "will" \)
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