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Ambrosiana - 18/02/2012 07:29 AM
#501

Quote:
Original Posted By compgeek
Hi guys, I'm new here (and to the translation world)

Just a little about me,

I'm one of the Indonesian translator/moderator team for Twitter -- part of Twitter localisation/internationalisation team. My (main) job is to translate, approve, and moderate translations on Twitter Translation Centre.

I'm currently in Auckland, NZ (I hope I can meet Tim Behrend someday, he's in Auckland too) studying Bachelor of International Hospitality Management, majoring HR, at AUT University.

Nice to meet you all! \)

I have a question. I hope someone can give me an explicit answer. Is working as a full-time, or freelance, translator in Indonesia give us loads of money? How much approximately can one get in a month being a full-time translator? Exact number please, but approximation would be accepted.

I'm asking this because I really love translating and I feel that I don't belong to hospitality world. I'm seriously considering taking yet another 4 years to study English Literature/Sastra Bahasa Indonesia in Indonesia but I'm not sure if it's worth the effort, the time, and/or the money spent.

Thought, guys?

Also, please kindly inform if there is a university in Indonesia that specifically teaches Comparative Literature, this particular faculty interests me.


Thank you!!! \)


Hi there...

From your story, it seems like you're one of Bahtera member. I'm one of Bahtera members too ;)
About your question

Quote:
I have a question. I hope someone can give me an explicit answer. Is working as a full-time, or freelance, translator in Indonesia give us loads of money? How much approximately can one get in a month being a full-time translator? Exact number please, but approximation would be accepted.


I once joined a workshop held by Association of Indonesian Translators (Himpunan Penerjemah Indonesia) in Malang about Recent Prospect of Translator profession, and one of the speakers, Mrs. Anna Wiksmadhara presented material about how much a translator received, and this is the salary level of in-house translator:

1. Translator in Oil, gas, & Energy Company ( > IDR 30.000.000 per month)
2. Translator in Multinational Company (IDR 15.000.000 - IDR 30.000.000 per month)
3. Translator in Law Firm (IDR 5.000.000 - IDR 15.000.000 per month)
4. Translator in Publishing Company (IDR 3.000.000 - IDR 10.000.000 per month)

And what about Freelance Translator? The fact is, a freelance translator has a wide range of income depend on their field and project. There are some Freelance Translator who received > IDR 50.000.000 per month (such as Mr. Eddie Notowidigdo, Mrs. Sofia Mansoor, Mr. Sutarto, Mr. Ahnan Alex and many more).
From their stories, they used to look for projects from International Agencies, also in ProZ. Once you've already had your name in International world, you'll have no more difficulties in finding project.
However, it needs a lot of experiences and skills, like mastering CAT Tools, building relations with International Agencies, and so on.

Spoiler for Workshop
Quote:
How to start working as translator (tips to enter translation world)

Mr. Eddie Notowidigdo, the chief of HPI and me



Nowadays, I still haven't mastered CAT Tools \( (I'll try my best to master it someday)
However, translator profession has given me enough income for myself ;)
Even it saved me from bankruptcy (I once owed a Game Center and become bankrupt and focus myself as translator)
So, if you really love this profession, I can guarantee that you'll get enough money for yourself from this occupation D
tonnyc - 18/02/2012 10:25 AM
#502

Keep in mind that at the bottom the pay is ridiculously low. A lot of people have no idea how hard translation is, and thus are not willing to pay appropriately and, if pointed out that translation requires years of education and/or experience, will counter by pointing out that Google Translate exists and is free. Well, they get what they pay for.
compgeek - 18/02/2012 10:55 AM
#503

Quote:
Original Posted By Ambrosiana


Hi there...

From your story, it seems like you're one of Bahtera member. I'm one of Bahtera members too ;)
About your question



I once joined a workshop held by Association of Indonesian Translators (Himpunan Penerjemah Indonesia) in Malang about Recent Prospect of Translator profession, and one of the speakers, Mrs. Anna Wiksmadhara presented material about how much a translator received, and this is the salary level of in-house translator:

1. Translator in Oil, gas, & Energy Company ( > IDR 30.000.000 per month)
2. Translator in Multinational Company (IDR 15.000.000 - IDR 30.000.000 per month)
3. Translator in Law Firm (IDR 5.000.000 - IDR 15.000.000 per month)
4. Translator in Publishing Company (IDR 3.000.000 - IDR 10.000.000 per month)

And what about Freelance Translator? The fact is, a freelance translator has a wide range of income depend on their field and project. There are some Freelance Translator who received > IDR 50.000.000 per month (such as Mr. Eddie Notowidigdo, Mrs. Sofia Mansoor, Mr. Sutarto, Mr. Ahnan Alex and many more).
From their stories, they used to look for projects from International Agencies, also in ProZ. Once you've already had your name in International world, you'll have no more difficulties in finding project.
However, it needs a lot of experiences and skills, like mastering CAT Tools, building relations with International Agencies, and so on.

Spoiler for Workshop



Nowadays, I still haven't mastered CAT Tools \( (I'll try my best to master it someday)
However, translator profession has given me enough income for myself ;)
Even it saved me from bankruptcy (I once owed a Game Center and become bankrupt and focus myself as translator)
So, if you really love this profession, I can guarantee that you'll get enough money for yourself from this occupation D


haha yes I'm a member of that group.

Thank you for your response, very insightful. However, I highly believe that those are figures that can only be earned by experienced translators, am I wrong (please tell me I am *touchwood*)? Like, by those who you've mentioned above.

How about translators like me and many other, who have barely, say, graduated from uni and getting a decent job in a company which doesn't have any specialisation in any field you've mentioned above?

Just sharing, I've joined several international translation agencies for a while but I feel I haven't gained any definite benefits from them lol. I'm qualified to be a full member, or whatever they call it, of HPI (I can provide an example of my previous works consisting of 150K characters total, or, provide a translation-related employment statement from a company. In my case, it's Twitter).

THANKS A LOT!

Quote:
Original Posted By tonnyc
Keep in mind that at the bottom the pay is ridiculously low. A lot of people have no idea how hard translation is, and thus are not willing to pay appropriately and, if pointed out that translation requires years of education and/or experience, will counter by pointing out that Google Translate exists and is free. Well, they get what they pay for.


just like Microsoft Support Centre? That's what they get for localising their website using translation machine \)
compgeek - 18/02/2012 11:04 AM
#504

Pardon me for the crude, abrupt post, but you guys might love this blog: http://mox.ingenierotraductor.com/
Ambrosiana - 18/02/2012 11:23 AM
#505

Quote:
Original Posted By compgeek
[FONT="Palatino Linotype"]
So, all in all, would you Ambrosiana and all you guys here, after gleaning a bit background of myself, recommend me to spend another 4 years to study in Indonesia in order to get some legit qualification?

THANKS A LOT!



Hmm... From your experience as translator, I think you have good qualification.
If you worry about the salary, I suggest you to apply in a Translation Agency. Some agencies gives monthly salary plus bonus depend on the amount of translation project. The other alternative, you can try to work in a company which suits your qualification (I think you have enough qualification to attract so many multinational companies in Surabaya) and work as part-time translator.
If you want to be a freelance, you should jump in the competition, winning projects and building relationship with international agencies. I heard there are many good agencies in Australia and New Zealand which need translators for Bahasa Indonesia. You can start from your position right now.
Based on my experience, and some people's experience, the hard phase is the beginning. Once you can build good relationship with some agencies and put your name in international translation world, the projects will come to you continuously.

About legit qualification as legal translator or sworn translator, I think it depends on you. the certificate will surely be a benefit for you in translation world. Besides, while chasing higher education, you can still work as freelance translator to enrich your CV. However, as far as I know, sworn-translator certificate is only published by Universitas Indonesia. There's still no certification program in Surabaya or other cities in Indonesia.

Quote:
Original Posted By compgeek
[SIZE="3"]Pardon me for the crude, abrupt post, but you guys might love this blog: http://mox.ingenierotraductor.com/

That's quite funny comics about translation world ngakaks


[/FONT][/SIZE]
compgeek - 18/02/2012 11:48 AM
#506

Quote:
Original Posted By Ambrosiana


Hmm... From your experience as translator, I think you have good qualification.
If you worry about the salary, I suggest you to apply in a Translation Agency. Some agencies gives monthly salary plus bonus depend on the amount of translation project. The other alternative, you can try to work in a company which suits your qualification (I think you have enough qualification to attract so many multinational companies in Surabaya) and work as part-time translator.
If you want to be a freelance, you should jump in the competition, winning projects and building relationship with international agencies. I heard there are many good agencies in Australia and New Zealand which need translators for Bahasa Indonesia. You can start from your position right now.
Based on my experience, and some people's experience, the hard phase is the beginning. Once you can build good relationship with some agencies and put your name in international translation world, the projects will come to you continuously.

About legit qualification as legal translator or sworn translator, I think it depends on you. the certificate will surely be a benefit for you in translation world. Besides, while chasing higher education, you can still work as freelance translator to enrich your CV. However, as far as I know, sworn-translator certificate is only published by Universitas Indonesia. There's still no certification program in Surabaya or other cities in Indonesia.


That's quite funny comics about translation world ngakaks




Thanks again, Ambro. This is so frustrating haha. I'm not particularly concerned about the salary but, let's face it, the standard salary in New Zealand is generally higher compared to that of Indonesia, so if I pursue this career for the sake of hobby and interest, and not gaining as much as if I work in NZ, I will surely be deemed foolish. Pursuing dream job only happens in movie \)

Would you please take a look at my translation and give a comment about it, please? Everyone is welcome.
DO GIVE ME YOUR BEST HARSHEST COMMENTS, DO NITPICKING, BE PEDANTIC, BE AS PRETENTIOUS AS AS YOU CAN.

If you'd be kind enough to do it, please refer to Twitter Stories in English, for the original scripts & Cerita Twitter dalam Bahasa Indonesia for the translations. I translate all of those articles.

I want some detailed verdict, but an overall opinion is okay too.

P.S.: Oh how I so agree that the hardest phase of all is the beginning.
tonnyc - 18/02/2012 01:32 PM
#507

@compgeek You're often too literal. Also, unnecessary articles. Words like "di", "untuk", "oleh" can often be eliminated while retaining the meaning.

@MarkHayward @JerryRizzo @DanThompson @SophieCollard @SamDuckworth @TheWorld @RogerEbert @ChadOchocinco @MaureenEvans @BulletSkan @ChrisStrouth Good translation for them all.

@Myra McEntire Menulis sebuah buku dan mendapatkan kontrak film.
@ReporterBrianS Menurunkan 35 kg di Twitter.
@SohaibAthar Tanpa sengaja menge-tweet langsung penyerbuan markas Obama bin Laden.
@KevinDurant Main-main rugby bendera dengan pengikutnya.
@DanielMorales Reuni dengan putrinya setelah 11 tahun.
@JuliaProbst Menyampaikan ucapan para pemain yang tak terdengar penggemar.
@StefanieGordon @DrWillyMutunga I disagree with your word choice but that's all.
@OkanBayulgen @Akut Menyelamatkan dua orang yang terperangkap gempa bumi Turki.
@PeterShankman Dapat kejutan makan malam bistik.
@AaronDurand Menyelamatkan toko buku ibunya dengan Tweet.
@QueenRaniaAlAbdullah Memulai sebuah percakapan global (dengan satu sandwich).
@Burberry Memperlihatkan gaya sebelum berpanggung.
@RebeccaChiao Mengungkapkan pelecehan sambil melindungi para korban.
@RaviPina Membagi info KA lewat crowd-sourcing dan twitter (setahu saya crowd-sourcing belum ada padanan bahasa Indonesianya).
@佳栄 Fishermen Menjual tangkapan mereka sebelum berlabuh.
@MarkSlavonia Menantang Lance Armstrong bersepeda di jalan tercuram dunia
compgeek - 18/02/2012 02:56 PM
#508

Quote:
Original Posted By tonnyc
@compgeek You're often too literal. Also, unnecessary articles. Words like "di", "untuk", "oleh" can often be eliminated while retaining the meaning.

@MarkHayward @JerryRizzo @DanThompson @SophieCollard @SamDuckworth @TheWorld @RogerEbert @ChadOchocinco @MaureenEvans @BulletSkan @ChrisStrouth Good translation for them all.

@Myra McEntire Menulis sebuah buku dan mendapatkan kontrak film.
@ReporterBrianS Menurunkan 35 kg di Twitter.
@SohaibAthar Tanpa sengaja menge-tweet langsung penyerbuan markas Obama bin Laden.
@KevinDurant Main-main rugby bendera dengan pengikutnya.
@DanielMorales Reuni dengan putrinya setelah 11 tahun.
@JuliaProbst Menyampaikan ucapan para pemain yang tak terdengar penggemar.
@StefanieGordon @DrWillyMutunga I disagree with your word choice but that's all.
@OkanBayulgen @Akut Menyelamatkan dua orang yang terperangkap gempa bumi Turki.
@PeterShankman Dapat kejutan makan malam bistik.
@AaronDurand Menyelamatkan toko buku ibunya dengan Tweet.
@QueenRaniaAlAbdullah Memulai sebuah percakapan global (dengan satu sandwich).
@Burberry Memperlihatkan gaya sebelum berpanggung.
@RebeccaChiao Mengungkapkan pelecehan sambil melindungi para korban.
@RaviPina Membagi info KA lewat crowd-sourcing dan twitter (setahu saya crowd-sourcing belum ada padanan bahasa Indonesianya).
@佳栄 Fishermen Menjual tangkapan mereka sebelum berlabuh.
@MarkSlavonia Menantang Lance Armstrong bersepeda di jalan tercuram dunia


Thanks for the input. However, for the sake of consistency I have to prefix all the verbs with 'me/ber' thing to make them look uniform. Is this not okay?

Here's my $0.02

@myra - I agree, your translation sounds better
@bryan - the reason I didn't put '35 kg' there because it would be too long and might break the design, thus 'menurunkan berat badannya'. Would people grasp the meaning of 'menurunkan 35 kg'? Because to me it's not too descriptive and quite ambiguous
@sohaib - I prefer 'menge-tweet secara langsung' because, to me, it implies 'live-tweeting' more than 'menge-tweet langsung' which to me could mean 'tweet directly, 'twet straight away', 'tweet immediately', and so on.
@kevin - rugby and American football is not the same. Therefore I didn't use the word 'rugby'. Indonesian doesn't have the equivalence of American football. That's why I use 'sepak bola Amerika' there, although admittedly it's a bit verbose
@daniel -the same reason with the paragraph above, 'bereuni' instead of 'reuni'. Is this wrong? I do want to know why using ''reuni' is more appropriate than 'bereuni'.
@julia - hmm your translation is better I think, but could it be better if I use 'tidak' instead of 'tak' there?
@stefani @drwilly - could you elaborate please?
@okan & @akut - definitely better than mine!
@peter - again, same reason. I prefer 'mendapatkan', tell me if it's not appropriate in this case. Is 'stik' not a valid Indonesian word?
@aaron - I agree I shouldn't have put 'milik' there, but I include 'sebuah' because he literally made the difference with 'a tweet', not tweet in general.
@Queen - I use 'global' because 'mendunia' is too long for the in-spacious design, and 'sandwich' is 'sandwich'?
@Burberry - I think this is only a matter of choice? Tell me why mine isn't good.
@Rebecca - I'll change 'Mengungkap' to 'Mengungkapkan' as you've suggested but isn't 'selagi' okay?
@Ravi - Should I abbreviate 'Kereta Api' into 'KA'? I know there's no Indonesian word yet for 'crowd-sourcing' so I rephrase the sentence and came up with that one. Doesn't seem right?
@fishermen - I agree my translation sound ugly (I need to sort it out), but could you give me alternatives aside from the one you've suggested?
@MarkSlavonia 'Menantang Lance Armstrong bersepeda di jalan tercuram dunia', to me, implies that both Mark and Lance will do the deed, thus that 'untuk' preceeding 'bersepeda', iz it no right? 'jalan tercuram dunia' vs 'jalan tercuram di dunia' does it really matter?

THANK YOU SO MUCH!! \) looking fwd to ur response

P.S.: We'd be pleased if you can contribute to the Twitter translation projects (as a volunteer translator) \)
compgeek - 18/02/2012 03:56 PM
#509

Quote:
Original Posted By tonnyc
Keep in mind that at the bottom the pay is ridiculously low. A lot of people have no idea how hard translation is, and thus are not willing to pay appropriately and, if pointed out that translation requires years of education and/or experience, will counter by pointing out that Google Translate exists and is free. Well, they get what they pay for.


hi, after reading this post again, I just realised that 'at the bottom' meant Aussie and NZ, yes? OMG lol. Is this really true? How do you know?
nengmemew - 19/02/2012 11:58 AM
#510

Quote:
Original Posted By Ambrosiana
Here another new vacancy to overcome your sadness Peace:



email sent, thx a lot n wish me luck \)
ayatokiya - 19/02/2012 04:21 PM
#511

Ini yang saya janjikan artikel Bahasa >- English
Ini saya coba setelah saya baca2 buku translasi untuk pertma kali akhir Januari...
\)b (Sincerely, please take a look)

Spoiler for Original text


24 Januari 2012. Maksud dan tujuan “Pertamina Motor Club” melakukan touring ke Kuningan Jawa Barat, pada 21-22 Januari 2012 tidak sekedar hura-hura naik motor bareng, tetapi yang lebih penting adalah melakukan aksi bakti sosial, yaitu memberikan sumbangan berupa sembako dan sejumlah uang santunan di dua lokasi. Kali ini yang beruntung menerima aksi baksos PMC adalah desa Translok dan SLB A & B di daerah Kasturi, Kuningan, Jawa Barat.

“Sebenarnya ini merupakan acara tahunan yang rutin dilakukan oleh PMC, dan sudah menjadi tradisi PMC setiap kali touring harus ada kegiatan sosialnya. Setidaknya setiap tahun PMC bisa melakukan turing ditambah dengan aksi baksos sebanyak 3-5 kali,” kata Sutrisno, Ketum PMC seusai acara bakti sosial di daerah Translok.

Bantuan yang diberikan oleh PMC senantiasa masih dalam radius lingkup kerja PT Pertamina, seperti dalam radius Kabupaten Kuningan yang mana satu wilayah dengan Depot Pertamina di Cirebon. Lokasi Translok ini adalah sebuah desa tertinggal yang daerah yang cukup sulit dijangkau. Sekitar 500 warga mendiami di desa ini, dan sebagian penduduknya berprofesi sebagai buruh dan petani yang baleh dibilang penghasilannya pas-pasan atau bahkan sangat minim.

Tanpa bermaksud mencari muka, PMC memang sengaja melakukan hal tersebut agar pihak pemerintah setempat melek dan sadar bahwa masih ada daerah miskin yang sangat membutuhkan perhatian dari pemda setempat.

“Terus terang bantuan yang kita berikan tidak pernah berkoordinasi dengan pemda setempat. Hal ini dilakukan agar untuk menghindari terjadinya penggelapan dana bantuan yang kami berikan,” tambah Sutrisno. Namun diluar dugaan acara ini sempat dihadiri olehAcep Purnama, Ketua DPRD yang juga menjabat Ketua DPC PDIP Kab. Kuningan, Jawa Barat.

Sementara bantuan berupa uang santunan diberikan kepada anak-anak yatim-piatu dan murid-murid SLB A & B Yayasan Pendidikan Anak Luar Biasa Perwari cab. Kuningan yang beralamat di Jalan Muhammad Toha No. 4 Kasturi Kec. Kramat Mulya Kab. Kuningan Jawa Barat.

Acara baksos PMC ini diadakan oleh PMC Divisi Gas Domestik (Gasdom), dimana BroThoriq, Asisten Manager Divisi LPG & Gas Produk Domestik, berperan sebagai ketuanya mengatakan, “Touring ini adalah mengantarkan baksos (sumbangan), jadi bukan touring sambil baksos, dan sumbangan dari divisi gasdom tidak sampai disini saja. Kedepannya kami akan mencari daerah lain yang sangat membutuhkan bantuan kami,” jelas Bro Thoriq.

Hmm.. tanpa dibentuk chapter, PMC pun sudah otomatis membentuk chapter sesuai dengan divisinya. Tapi tahun 2012 kabarnya bakal ada perubahan dalam sistem organisasi, dimana chapter divisi akan diganti menjadi chapter wilayah.

“Hal ini supaya tidak berantakan, dan secepatnya PMC akan saya bentuk dalam chapter-chapter per wilayah seperti di HOG, bukan lagi per divisi. Dan PMC Jakarta sebagai pusat komando atau Mother Chapter,” jelas Sutrisno.

Memang sih.. agak membingungkan jika PMC dibagi per divisi. PMC Jakarta saja sekarang sudah berjumlah 400 member yang mana anggotanya dartang dari berbagai chapter divisi. Kalau ini dibuat se-Indonesia berarti bisa mencapai ribuan jumlahnya, padahal ini adalah perusahaan nasional terbesar di Indonesia. Jadi bisa dibayangkan repotnya kalau PMC dibuat chapter per divisi.

Selesai baksos rombongan PMC kembali ke Jakarta. Namun kali ini mereka mengambil rute selatan. Disini peserta touring benar-benar diuji ketrampilan riding-nya. Karena rute selatan diwarnai dengan berbagai tikungan tajam, tanjakan dan turunan curam, ditambah dengan guyuran hujan deras dengan rute Kuningan – Cilimus – Kadipaten – Tomo – Paseh – Buah Dua – Cibogo – Subang – Kali Jati – Sadang – Karawang – Bekasi – Jakarta.


Spoiler for Translated

24Jan2012. The purpose and the goal of Pertamina Motor Club’s touring to Kuningan West Java, on 21-22 Jan 2012 wasn’t only for the purpose of self enjoyment by having a ride together on motorcycles, instead what more important was they held a social service, which they gave a donation such as food supply and some financial aid in 2 location. This time, 2 locations, lucky enough to be chosen for carrying out the program from PMC was Translok village and Special School A & B around Kasturi region, Kuningan , West Java.

“Actually it’s an every year routine program, done by PMC, and has become the tradition of PMC to carry out a social service action whenever a touring is held. Every year at least PMC can do a touring alongside the social service for about 3 to 5 times.” Said Sutrisno, Head of PMC after the end of the social service at Translok region.

The support, given by PMC constantly still in Pertamina’s radius scope of work, like in Kuningan Regency’s radius, where it’s in the same area with Pertamina’s storehouse in Cirebon. This Translok area is an undeveloped village, located in a hard enough place to be reached. Around 500 villagers live in this village, and some of them work as a labourer or a farmer, whose earnings are just slightly enough or even very low.

Without trying to be in spotlight, PMC intentionally did the program in order for the local government to open their eyes and realize that there is still an area under poverty which strongly needs the attention from the local government.

“To be honest, the support that we gave have never been coordinated with the local government. This is done in order to avoid a slush of fund that we gave,” added Sutrisno. However unexpectedly this program had been attended by Acep Purnama, Head of the Indonesian House of Representatives, who also served as the Head of DPC PDIP Kuningan Regency, West Java.

In the other hand , the support in form of money is given to orphaned childs and students from SLB A & B Yayasan Pendidikan Anak Luar Biasa Perwari in Kuningan branch which is adressed at Muhammad Toha street, No.4 Kasturi, Kramat Mulya Sub-District, Kuningan Regency, West Java

This PMC social service program is held by PMC’s Domestic Gas division, where BroThoriq, the Assistant Manager of LPG & Domestic Product Gas divison, took a role as the head and said, “This touring is to deliver social service (donation), not a tour while running the social service program, and the donation from Domestic Gas division doesn’t come only to this point. In the near future we would like to look for other regions which strongly need our help and support.” Said Bro thoriq.

Well, without even making a chapter, PMC has automatically formed a chapter according to their division. Nevertheless, in 2012 there spread a news that there will be a change inside the organisation system, where division chapter will become region chapter.

“It’s made in order to avoid mess, and as quickly as possible PMC will be formed into chapters by region like in HOG, not by division anymore. Furthermore PMC Jakarta will act as the central command or Mother Chapter” said Sutrisno.

It is quite confusing if PMC is being divided like this. Todays PMC Jakarta has already come to 4oo members whose members come from various division chapter. If this thing is designated in all over Indonesia it means it can reach thousand of them, whereas this is the biggest national company in Indonesia. Thus, we can imagine how difficult it can be if PMC is made in division per chapter.

After the social service is finished PMC went back to Jakarta. Nevertheless, this time they took the southern route. Here the touring participant’s riding skills were really being tested, due to the fact that the southern route is full with different kinds of hairpin curve and steep slopes, not to mention the shower from the heavy rain with the following route : Kuningan – Cilimus – Kadipaten – Tomo – Paseh – Buah Dua – Cibogo – Subang – Kali Jati – Sadang – Karawang – Bekasi – Jakarta


Please kindly give this noob translator wannabe some good advices Yb Thx
jaya28inside - 19/02/2012 04:37 PM
#512

Quote:
Original Posted By Ambrosiana


Hmm... From your experience as translator, I think you have good qualification.
If you worry about the salary, I suggest you to apply in a Translation Agency. Some agencies gives monthly salary plus bonus depend on the amount of translation project. The other alternative, you can try to work in a company which suits your qualification (I think you have enough qualification to attract so many multinational companies in Surabaya) and work as part-time translator.
If you want to be a freelance, you should jump in the competition, winning projects and building relationship with international agencies. I heard there are many good agencies in Australia and New Zealand which need translators for Bahasa Indonesia. You can start from your position right now.
Based on my experience, and some people's experience, the hard phase is the beginning. Once you can build good relationship with some agencies and put your name in international translation world, the projects will come to you continuously.

About legit qualification as legal translator or sworn translator, I think it depends on you. the certificate will surely be a benefit for you in translation world. Besides, while chasing higher education, you can still work as freelance translator to enrich your CV. However, as far as I know, sworn-translator certificate is only published by Universitas Indonesia. There's still no certification program in Surabaya or other cities in Indonesia.


That's quite funny comics about translation world ngakaks




translator agency? hmmm. i wonder, if there's any translator agency i could see in bandung area.

ANyOne? D
compgeek - 20/02/2012 10:57 AM
#513

Looking for English-Chinese and English-Japanese translators to translate 500-lines worth or so for tool-tips and media.

Need to get it done quickly and at affordable rates. Please come up with price and time frame asap.

Contact [email]erichns2001@yahoo.com[/email] directly.

Example of strings that need to be translated:

Quote:
"The serial connectivity feature of this app is designed to work only with approved network device console ports. For a list of the device vendors supported see www.get-console.com"
tonnyc - 20/02/2012 12:38 PM
#514

Quote:
Original Posted By compgeek
hi, after reading this post again, I just realised that 'at the bottom' meant Aussie and NZ, yes? OMG lol. Is this really true? How do you know?


No, not down under. I meant at the bottom as in at the bottom of the heap. All those people that Ambrosiana mentioned would be at the top of their respective specialization, but at the bottom you'll have people getting paid Rp. 5000/page or less.

Quote:
Original Posted By compgeek
Thanks for the input. However, for the sake of consistency I have to prefix all the verbs with 'me/ber' thing to make them look uniform. Is this not okay?

Here's my $0.02

@myra - I agree, your translation sounds better
@bryan - the reason I didn't put '35 kg' there because it would be too long and might break the design, thus 'menurunkan berat badannya'. Would people grasp the meaning of 'menurunkan 35 kg'? Because to me it's not too descriptive and quite ambiguous
@sohaib - I prefer 'menge-tweet secara langsung' because, to me, it implies 'live-tweeting' more than 'menge-tweet langsung' which to me could mean 'tweet directly, 'twet straight away', 'tweet immediately', and so on.
@kevin - rugby and American football is not the same. Therefore I didn't use the word 'rugby'. Indonesian doesn't have the equivalence of American football. That's why I use 'sepak bola Amerika' there, although admittedly it's a bit verbose
@daniel -the same reason with the paragraph above, 'bereuni' instead of 'reuni'. Is this wrong? I do want to know why using ''reuni' is more appropriate than 'bereuni'.
@julia - hmm your translation is better I think, but could it be better if I use 'tidak' instead of 'tak' there?
@stefani @drwilly - could you elaborate please?
@okan & @akut - definitely better than mine!
@peter - again, same reason. I prefer 'mendapatkan', tell me if it's not appropriate in this case. Is 'stik' not a valid Indonesian word?
@aaron - I agree I shouldn't have put 'milik' there, but I include 'sebuah' because he literally made the difference with 'a tweet', not tweet in general.
@Queen - I use 'global' because 'mendunia' is too long for the in-spacious design, and 'sandwich' is 'sandwich'?
@Burberry - I think this is only a matter of choice? Tell me why mine isn't good.
@Rebecca - I'll change 'Mengungkap' to 'Mengungkapkan' as you've suggested but isn't 'selagi' okay?
@Ravi - Should I abbreviate 'Kereta Api' into 'KA'? I know there's no Indonesian word yet for 'crowd-sourcing' so I rephrase the sentence and came up with that one. Doesn't seem right?
@fishermen - I agree my translation sound ugly (I need to sort it out), but could you give me alternatives aside from the one you've suggested?
@MarkSlavonia 'Menantang Lance Armstrong bersepeda di jalan tercuram dunia', to me, implies that both Mark and Lance will do the deed, thus that 'untuk' preceeding 'bersepeda', iz it no right? 'jalan tercuram dunia' vs 'jalan tercuram di dunia' does it really matter?

THANK YOU SO MUCH!! \) looking fwd to ur response

P.S.: We'd be pleased if you can contribute to the Twitter translation projects (as a volunteer translator) \)


@bryan The English says lost 75 pounds on Twitter. People naturally assume he lost his weight. Not losing 75 pounds of money, or losing 75 pounds of baggage. Why should the Indonesian be any different? The cultures are not that different. Everyone wants to be slim and fit.

@sohaib I see what you are saying, but the fact is that our language translates "live" in that sense to "langsung". Sport matches are broadcasted "langsung dari GOR Senayan". Trying to distinguish the meaning by adding words can make the text harder to read. My version depends on the reader realizing the context, which I think they can.

@kevin I know rugby and American football are not the same. But your translation of football to "sepakbola Amerika" is, in my opinion, misleading. "Sepakbola" would be translated to soccer in American English. In Indonesia soccer is so popular that if I say "sepakbola Amerika" I think the average Indonesian will think that it's a variation of soccer rather than American football. I think by saying "rugby bendera" people will get a much closer image of what the sport is like than if I say "sepakbola Amerika", especially since flag football is played without any special equipment.

@daniel @julia Nothing wrong with yours. I went with a shorter translation. Reuni is actually not an exact translation, since reuni is a noun rather than a verb when the original uses a verb, so your translation of bereuni is actually more correct. However, the meaning stays the same, so I went for the shorter one.

@stefani @drwilly Not much to elaborate. I would have translated them a different way but yours are valid too and the difference would be just nitpicking.

@peter Dapat is shorter without changing the meaning. Stik is not the correct translation, as it would refer to "stick", not "steak". The Indonesian word "bistik" was absorbed from the Dutch and literally means "beefsteak" but has been expanded to include all sort of steaks.

@aaron Re: a tweet. If you want to emphasize the singular, why not use "satu" rather than "sebuah"? Because classifying tweets as "sebuah" (as opposed to sebatang/seekor) is odd to me. Could be just me though.

@Queen Hey, I use global too. That's the right choice. As for sandwich, in practice the menu I see in cafes and restaurants usually say sandwich. It's probably one of those words that has an Indonesian equivalent but everyone uses the English word anyway.

@Burberry Shared the looks before hitting the runway is hard to translate because it's an idiom inside idiom + another idiom. "Hitting the runway" can be translated several different ways. I chose "berpanggung". You chose "beraksi di atas pentas". Again I went for something shorter. It's twitter afterall. Short and sweet. But you aren't wrong there. However, "the looks" does not refer to the models and how they look. It actually refers to the fashion, or, in Indonesian, "fashion/mode/gaya". You translated "the looks" as "penampilan" which is a correct literal translation, but I don't think is correct given the context. Burberry isn't sharing pictures of the models. Burberry is sharing pictures of next season's fashion.

@Rebecca Selagi is okay.

@Ravi Abbreviating kereta api to KA is up to you. I see newspaper use that abbreviation often, but not that often. Unlike TNI or SD. Kudos for trying to come up with a translation of crowd-sourcing. I disagree with your choice, since IT terms are often left untranslated in practice, but hey, it's a good try and one that makes sense.

@fishermen Selling their catch obviously translate to "menjual tangkapan mereka". "Before their boats return to port" literally translates to "sebelum kapal-kapal mereka kembali ke pelabuhan". So your translation is actually more accurate than mine. But I went for a short version that I hope still has the same meaning. If you want alternatives "sebelum pulang ke pelabuhan" or "sebelum perahu mereka tiba di pelabuhan".

@MarkSlavonia No, it doesn't really matter, but that's exactly why I went with the shorter versions.
jaya28inside - 20/02/2012 10:22 PM
#515

agency.... rrr.... no feedback tough. \(
Ambrosiana - 21/02/2012 07:13 AM
#516

Quote:
Original Posted By jaya28inside
translator agency? hmmm. i wonder, if there's any translator agency i could see in bandung area.

ANyOne? D


Quote:
Original Posted By jaya28inside
agency.... rrr.... no feedback tough. \(

Unfortunately, I don't know the answers for all questions you've asked...
So I'm also waiting for other people's comment D

People who gathered in this thread have no formal group, so we never did any activity in any city D
You can simply join English Forum Gathering, and probably you'll be lucky to meet some translators from here.
You can find information about gathering from this thread

There are some agencies in Bandung but I don't know their names.
Sorry I cannot provide you the answer...
jaya28inside - 21/02/2012 08:57 PM
#517

Quote:
Original Posted By Ambrosiana



Unfortunately, I don't know the answers for all questions you've asked...
So I'm also waiting for other people's comment D

People who gathered in this thread have no formal group, so we never did any activity in any city D
You can simply join English Forum Gathering, and probably you'll be lucky to meet some translators from here.
You can find information about gathering from this thread

There are some agencies in Bandung but I don't know their names.
Sorry I cannot provide you the answer...


huhuuu... ic, ic, ic.... \(
ok then, that's nice answer.

i think that's rite, that the english community groups in bandung dont have the formal group yet. i think Bcoz, they're not fully established.
Bandung English Club, for instance.
And then INFIRU Club. And many more i guess...

They also have no info about the english translator agency. sigh. I called them just now. \(

but, if u guys have the info... let me know yah. D
Ambrosiana - 22/02/2012 09:34 AM
#518

This is information from our beloved friend, JChristie

Quote:

Caritas Czech Republic (CCR) is currently looking for qualified
staff to fill the following position:

Job Title : Executive Assistant/Translator
Code : EA-BA
Supervisor : Head Of Mission
Duty Station : Banda Aceh
Expected Duration : March 1 - June 30, 2012

Main Duties:
* The Executive Assistant/
Translator will translate written documents as assigned and needed by the HOM.
* The Executive Assistant/ Translator will
act as interpreter for the HOM when requested.
* The Executive Assistant/ Translator
will respond to correspondence for the HOM.
* The Executive Assistant/ Translator
will schedule meetings and business trips for the HOM in cooperation with the
other support staff.
* The Executive Assistant/ Translator
will travel across Aceh with the HOM on a regular basis to attend coordination
meetings and monitoring and evaluation activities.
* The Executive Assistant/ Translator
will serve as a project assistant on various activities when direct by the HOM.
* The Executive Assistant/ Translator
will be asked to interpret for the HOM in government meetings and in front of
large groups in formal settings. The Executive Assistant/ Translator must be
conformable giving presentations and with formal public speaking.
Recruitment Qualification:

Education:

* University Degree in English

Experience:

* Translation and
interpretation experience needed
* Note taking and
minute preparation
* Minimum 2 years
office experience
* Excellent computer
skills (Excel test needed)
* Well organized and
independent
* People person with
good social skills
* Must be willing and
able to travel out of Banda Aceh up to 10 days per month with very little
notice to prepare for departure.
* Must be physically
able to withstand the demands of travel in difficult conditions for the
duration of the project.
Language Requirements:

Fluent written and
spoken Bahasa and English (test needed).
Written level of
English must be professional.

How
to apply :

Application must
include a cover letter in English and current Curriculum Vitae with the
position code as the subject of the email.
CV should include
2-3 page professional resume with education, and work experience (English only)
and 3 professional references (not related to/ family member with) the candidate
complete with names, job position and working phone numberfor the reference.
Resumes must have
full contact detail of candidate and qualified candidates should sent the application to [email]caritas.ceko@gmail.comby[/email] COB 27 February 2012


Note
to applicants:
“No transportation costs related to relocation will be provided.”
Ambrosiana - 22/02/2012 09:39 AM
#519

This information is from our beloved friend, Jchristie

Quote:

Selected individuals and institutions will work with the project in Jakarta, Central Kalimantan and possibly
Sumatera.

The Indonesia Australia Forest Carbon Partnership (IAFCP) Facility is funded by Australian Aid - managed by IDSS Pty. Ltd. and Euroconsult Mott MacDonald on behalf of AusAID.

The Indonesia Australia Forest Carbon Partnership (IAFCP) is a partnership between the Government of the Republic Indonesia and the Government of Australia to assist Indonesia in reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation (REDD+). Under this partnership, AusAID and the Department of Climate Change and Energy Efficiency (DCCEE) are working with the Ministry of Forestry, and other Indonesian government agencies to demonstrate how REDD+ can contribute to global efforts to mitigate climate change.

The Kalimantan Forest and Climate Partnership (KFCP) is a key activity under IAFCP. The goal of KFCP is to demonstrate a credible, equitable, and effective approach to reducing greenhouse gas emissions from deforestation and forest degradation, including from the degradation of peat lands, that can inform a post-2013 global climate change
agreement and enable Indonesia’s meaningful participation in future international carbon markets.

Background:
The Indonesia Australia Forest Carbon Partnership (IAFCP) requires the periodic services of:
1. Translators to translate documents from Indonesia into English and from English into Indonesia; and
2. Interpreters to provide Interpretationduring seminars, workshops, conferences and official visits.

IAFCP aims to create a panelof translators andinterpreters from which it can draw upon to
fulfil a variety of short-term, freelance assignments
Nature of the Assignment
· Indonesia-English and English-Indonesia translators are required to translate a variety of materials including documents, speeches, press releases, brochures, and reports produced by and for the use of IAFCP. Assignments
for the translation of documents may be carried out remotely and work will be submitted via email.
· Indonesia-English / English-Indonesia Interpreters are required to provide interpretationduring seminars, workshops, conferences and official visits organized by IAFCP. Assignments will be conducted at the site of the event.
Competencies:

Translation Skills:
1. Educational qualifications preferred,but must have excellent English and Bahasa Indonesia writing skills;
2. Excellent analytical abilities and editing skills;
3. Attention to detail and ability to maintain an adequate volume of output.
4. Able to detect and understand nuances in the original
text; and
5. Understandcultural references that may need to be explained, including colloquialisms and slang as well as other expressions that may not be able to be translatedliterally.

Interpretation skills:
1. Educational qualifications preferredbut must be fluent in English and Bahasa Indonesia;
2. Attention to detail along with understanding what is being communicated in both languages;
3. Able to clearly express idea and thoughts;
4. Understandcultural references that may need to be explained, including colloquialisms and slang as well as other expressions that may not be able to be translatedliterally.
5. High level of concentration.

General

· Planning and Organizing:Ability to establish priorities, plan, coordinate and monitor own work and to deliver work on time within agreed deadlines.
· Teamwork: Good coordination with others to ensure consistency of terminology and style; anddemonstrated ability to gain the support and cooperation of others in a team environment, with sensitivity and respect for diversity.
· Knowledge: Knowledge in the areas of Governance, Environment, Climate Change as well as experience are advantages. Experience in using word processing and other computer applications.

Interested individuals or organisations must submit
the following documents/information and demonstrate that they are qualified:

1. A resume and cover letter; and For Translator- Three (3) examples of recent, relevant translation work. Each should be no longer than five pages. Interpreter- Three (3) recent examples of interpretation worknoting where,when, nature of the event,and audience.
2. A list of three references;
3. Financial offer: For Translator:Rate per page (A4 paper, average 550 words, font 11pt. Tenderer to note rate and currency for translation from English to Indonesia, and from Indonesia to English.
Interpretation:Rate per hour.Tenderer to note rate in Rupiah for translation from English to Indonesia, and from Indonesia to English.
Note: Applications without financial offer will not be
considered. IAFCP reserve the right to negotiate rates that are deemed too
high.
Note: Please note that only short-listed candidates
will be notified. Qualified female candidates are strongly encouraged to apply.

Evaluation of proposals:
The following criteria will be used during the
evaluation:
a) Completeness of the proposal;
b) Responsiveness to the TOR;
c) Quality of provided translation work samples;
d) Price

Submission requirements:
Proposal should be submitted in a sealed envelope at
the following address:
Indonesia Australia Forest
Carbon Partnership
World Trade Centre 8th Floor,
Jl. Jenderal Sudirman Kav.31
Jakarta 12920, Indonesia
Attention: HR Unit
Or
by email to [email]tender@iafcp.or.id[/email] no later than 26 February 2011.
IAFCP
reserves the right to accept or reject proposal received
after this date

ATTENTION:Please indicate on the envelopeor on e-mail subject the following reference Translationand / Interpretation.Candidate can aply to both Translation and Interprer but must submit in a separate proposal.IAFCP will not be responsible for postal delays, if any, in the delivery of the bid documents or non-receipt of the same. Any request for clarification must be sent in writing, or by standard electronic means, to the address indicated above.
jaya28inside - 22/02/2012 02:29 PM
#520

i'm very happy that there are lots of jobs offered there... D

but it's not a outsourced type of working... sigh.
I'm unable to take it. :mewek ~nangis.

is there any more update?
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